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Teaching Category: 190 Entries


December 31, 2010

Finished!

There will come a time when you believe everything is finished.
That will be the beginning.
—Louis L'Amour

Source: Quotablecards.com

Posted by niganit at 5:25 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Profound | Teaching

May 31, 2010

Five Lessons of Winston Churchill's Life

Winston Churchill led a full life, and few people are ever likely to equal it—its amplitude, variety, and success on so many fronts. But all can learn from it, especially in FIVE ways.
~ The first lesson is: always aim high.
~ Lesson number two is: there is no substitute for hard work.
~ Third, and in its way most important, Churchill never allowed mistakes, disaster—personal or national—accidents, illnesses, unpopularity, and criticism to get him down.
~ Fourth, Churchill wasted an extraordinarily small amount of his time and emotional energy on the meanness of life: recrimination, shifting the blame onto others, malice, revenge seeking, dirty tricks, spreading rumors, harboring grudges, waging vendettas.
~ Finally, the absence of hatred left plenty of room for joy in Churchill's life.
—Paul Brown

Source: Churchill by Paul Johnson. Viking 2009 ISBN: 978-0-670-02105-5

Posted by niganit at 2:19 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Profound | Teaching

May 5, 2010

Magical Things

The universe is full of magical things, patiently waiting for our wits
to grow sharper.
—Eden Phillpotts

Source: Inspired Quote of the Week email subscription from Compendium, Inc.
See also: > Eden Phillpotts on Wikipedia

Posted by niganit at 4:29 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Profound | Teaching

March 14, 2010

Give Yourself a Daily Gift

Some teachers (and trainers, too) turn to poetry for inspiration and encouragement. I certainly do.
Here are some links that can provide a daily fix of poetry. Try them, you'll like it!
> Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac,
    http://writersalmanac.publicradio.org/
> Poetry Daily, http://poems.com/
> Poetry 180: A poem a Day for American High Schools,
    http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/
> Robert Pinsky’s Favorite Poem Project includes videos of poems being read,
    http://www.favoritepoem.org/videos.html.
> Poetry readings from Bill Moyer’s Fooling with Words
    http://www.pbs.org/wnet/foolingwithwords/main_video.html
> The Academy of American Poets has a listening booth where you can hear poets read their work http://www.poets.org/booth/booth.cfm

Source: Teaching with Fire: Poetry that Sustains the Courage to Teach Sam M. Intrator & Megan Scribner, editors. Jossey-Bass 2003 ISBN: 0-7879-6970-2
See also: The Courage to Teach programs

Posted by niganit at 11:10 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Inspirational | Poetry | Teaching

January 27, 2010

When to Stop Talking?

My great-grandfather used to say to his wife, my great-grandmother, who in turn told her daughter, my grandmother, who repeated it to her daughter, my mother, who used to remind her daughter, my own sister, that to talk well and eloquently was a very great art, but that an equally great one was to know the right moment to stop.
—Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Source: ThinkExist.com's Mozart Quotes
> It is the birthday of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart born in 1756 on this day in Salzburg, Austria. He died in Vienna, Austria on December 5, 1791. See The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Posted by niganit at 9:41 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Humorous | Teaching

November 23, 2009

How Do You Respond to a Problem?

The problem is rarely/never the problem. The response to the problem invariably ends of being the real problem.*
—Tom Peters
*Perception is all there is!

Source: Email subscription tom peters! Quotes of 23 November 2009.
See also: tompeters!.

Posted by niganit at 7:22 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Teaching

June 11, 2009

Be Open to New Ideas

Never stop learning and adapting. The world will always be changing. If you limit yourself to what you knew and what you were comfortable with earlier in life, you will grow increasingly frustrated as you age.
—David Niven, Ph.D. in Be Open to New Ideas: Number 13 of The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People

In research on older Americans, what predicted satisfaction more than finances or the state of their current relationships was their willingness to adapt. If they were willing to chnage some of their habits and expectations, their happiness was maintained even when their circumstances changed. Those who were resistant to change, on the other hand, were less than one-third likely to feel happy.
—Clark, F., M. Carlson, R. Zemke, F. Geyla, K. Patterson, and B. L. Ennevor. 1996. "Life Domains and Adaptive Strategies of a Group of Low Income, Well Older Adults." American Journal of Occupational Therapy 50:99.

Source: The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People: What Scientists Have Learned and How You Can Use It. by David Niven, Ph.D. 2000 HarperCollins ISBN: 0-06-251650-7
See also: Country Inns & Suites by Carlson Read & Return It program.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By Service: Navy
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

Posted by niganit at 7:21 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Inspirational | Motivating | Teaching

April 15, 2009

Blinding Ignorance

Blinding ignorance does mislead us.
O! Wretched mortals, open your eyes!
—Leonard da Vinci

Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff. Most fails. Some works.
You do more of what works. If it works big, others quickly copy it.
Then you do something else. The trick is the doing something else.
—Leonardo da Vinci

Source: BrainyQuote.com's Leonardo da Vinci Quotes
> It is the birthday of Leonardo da Vinci, born in Vinci, Italy in 1452. He died on May 2, 1519 in Cloux, France. Legend has it that King Francis was at his side when he died, cradling Leonardo's head in his arms.

Posted by niganit at 7:08 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Profound | Teaching

February 12, 2009

Presidential Leadership

Roosevelt's point was plain: Government counts, and in the right hands, it can be made to work. Strong federal action, not just private voluntary efforts and the invisible hand of the marketplace, was required to help those stricken in an emergency. The American people expected and deserved leadership in addressing their hardships, not just from state and local authorities, but from the White House. This fundamental insight would guide politicians and help millions of people in the years ahead, but it was lost on others, who ignored the lessons of Franklin Roosevelt at their peril.
—Jonathan Alter

Source: The Defining Moment: FDR's Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope by Jonathan Alter page 299 Simon & Schuster Paperbacks 2006 ISBN-13: 978-0-7432-4600-2.
See also:
> The White House.
>: The White House.gov > Biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt Thirty-Second President of the United States.

Posted by niganit at 12:53 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Poetry | Profound | Teaching

December 9, 2008

Take His Pot-Shot, Please!

I'm not getting paid much for staying alive but it's good experience.
— Ashleigh Brilliant

Source: The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Tuesday, December 9, 2008
See also:
> Today is the birthday of cartoonist, humorist, and poet Ashleigh Brilliant, born in London (1933). He's best known for his "Pot-Shots," sayings and one-liners that are never more than 17 words. He illustrates them with pen-and-ink drawings. You can buy his illustrated pot-shots from him online at AshleighBrilliant.com.

Posted by niganit at 12:45 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Humorous | Inspirational | Poetry | Teaching

September 5, 2008

Computer Error Haiku

Yesterday it worked
Today it is not working
Windows is like that

Serious error.
All shortcuts have disappeared.
Screen. Mind. Both are blank.
—Unknown

Source: Friday, September 5, 2008 Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes 2008 Calendar by Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 978-0-7407-6680-0

Posted by niganit at 7:32 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Humorous | Teaching

July 22, 2008

Mr. Rogers and Success

The thing I remember best about successful people I've met through the years is their obvious delight in what they're doing...and it seems to have very little to do with worldly success. They just love what their doing and they love it in front of others.
—Fred Rogers

Source: Tuesday, July 22, 2008 Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes 2008 Calendar by Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 978-0-7407-6680-0
See also:
> The World According to Mr. Rogers by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
> Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Posted by niganit at 6:52 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Love | Motivating | Teaching

July 15, 2008

Is Your Aim Too High?

The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it.
—Michaelangelo

Source: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes 2008 Calendar by Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 978-0-7407-6680-0

April 23, 2008

Happy Birthday William Shakespeare

The quality of mercy is not strain'd;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
'Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown;
His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptred sway,
It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,
It is an attribute to God himself;
And earthly power doth then show likest God's
When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,
Though justice be thy plea, consider this,
That in the course of justice none of us
Should see salvation; we do pray for mercy,
And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much
To mitigate the justice of thy plea,
Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice
Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there.
—Portia in Shakespeare's The Merchant Of Venice Act 4, scene 1, 180–187

Source: Shakespeare Quotes at enotes.com The quality of mercy is not strained.
> Also: The Merchant Of Venice Act 4, scene 1, 180–187
> It is the believed to be birthday of William Shakespeare, born in Stratford-on-Avon, England in 1564. He died on April 23, 1616.
> See: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Posted by niganit at 8:01 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Poetry | Profound | Teaching

April 21, 2008

Quick Reference: Metric Conversions

centimeters x 0.3937 = inches
inches x 2.54 = centimeters

meters x 3.281 = feet
feet x 0.3048 = meters

miles x 1.609 = kilometers
kilometers x 0.6214 = miles

kilograms x 2.2046 = pounds
pounds x 0.45359 = kilograms

Posted by niganit at 7:57 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: A Bit Off Topic | Teaching

March 18, 2008

Pursue a dream

What do you pack to pursue a dream, and what do you leave behind?
—Sandra Sharpe

Source: Reach for the Stars window card series, by Compendium, Inc.

Posted by niganit at 10:11 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Inspirational | Motivating | Teaching

February 28, 2008

Do What You Can

Do what
You can
,
Where
You are,
With what
You have!
—Theodore Roosevelt

Source: quotablecards: A card I gave myself on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008 in Portland, Oregon.

Posted by niganit at 9:30 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Creative | Famous People | Motivating | Teaching

February 14, 2008

Finish Each Day

Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and serenely and with too high a spirit to be cumbered with your old nonsense.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, February 7, 2008 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 9780-7407-6680-0

Posted by niganit at 1:33 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Motivating | Teaching

January 29, 2008

Are You a Leader?

If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.
—John Quincy Adams

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Monday, January 28, 2008 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 9780-7407-6680-0

Posted by niganit at 7:47 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Teaching

January 15, 2008

Hate Corrodes - Hate Destroys

Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the personality and eats away its vital unity. Hate destroys a man's sense of values and his objectivity. It causes him to describe the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, and to confuse the true with the false and the false with the true.
—Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: The Quotations Page – Martin Luther King Jr. Quotes
Today, Jan. 15th is the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, USA in 1929. He died in Memphis, Tennessee having been assassinated on April 4 , 1968.
See also:
> Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2008.
> New York Times Obituary Martin Luther King Jr.: Leader of Millions in Nonviolent Drive for Racial Justice by Murray Schumach published April 5, 1968

Posted by niganit at 9:16 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Profound | Teaching

January 4, 2008

Giving Credit

If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.
—Sir Isaac Newton

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, January 4, 2008
It is the birthday of Sir Isaac Newton who was born in Woolsthorpe, England in 1643. He died on 31 March 1727 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
See also:
> The BBC's Historic figures: Isaac Newton

Posted by niganit at 9:37 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Motivating | Teaching

December 31, 2007

Not Made Any of Us Safer

Out of panic and ideology, President Bush squandered America’s position of moral and political leadership, swept aside international institutions and treaties, sullied America’s global image, and trampled on the constitutional pillars that have supported our democracy through the most terrifying and challenging times. These policies have fed the world’s anger and alienation and have not made any of us safer.
—New York Times Editorial Staff

Source: The New York Times editorial Looking at America [free subscription required] published Monday, Dec. 31, 2007.

Posted by niganit at 6:38 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Profound | Sadness | Teaching

December 26, 2007

Let's Dance

It may be that we are doomed, that there is no hope for us, any of us, but if that is so then let us set up a last agonizing, bloodcurdling howl, a screech of defiance, a war whoop! Away with lamentation! Away with elegies and dirges! Away with biographies and histories, and libraries and museums! Let the dead eat the dead. Let us living ones dance about the rim of the crater, a last expiring dance. But a dance!
—Henry Miller in Tropic of Cancer

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, December 26, 2007
It is the birthday of Henry Miller who was born in New York City in 1891. He died June 7, 1980 in Pacific Palisades.
See also:
> Valentine Miller's Henry Miller: A Personal Collection
> Wikipedia's Henry Miller

Posted by niganit at 6:54 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Spiritual | Teaching

December 18, 2007

Thousands of Small, Routine Tasks

And tragically, since the onset of the scientific and technological revolution, it has seemingly become all too easy for ultrarational minds to create an elaborate edifice of clockwork efficiency capable of nightmarish cruelty on an industrial scale. The atrocities of Hitler and Stalin, and the mechanical sins of all who helped them, might have been inconceivable except for the separation of facts from values and knowledge from morality. In her study of Adolf Eichmann, who organized the death camp bureaucracy, Hannah Arendt coined the memorable phrase "the banality of evil" to describe the bizarre contrast between the humdrum and ordinary quality of the acts themselves—the thousands of small, routine tasks committed by workaday bureaucrats—and the horrific and satanic quality of their proximate consequences. It was precisely the machinelike efficiency of the system that carried out the genocide which seemed to make it possible for its functionaries to separate the thinking required in their daily work from the moral sensibility for which, because they were human beings, they must have had some capacity. This mysterious, vacant space in their souls, between thinking and feeling, is the suspected site of the inner crime. This barren of the spirit, rendered fallow by the blood of unkept brothers, is the precinct of the disembodied intellect, which knows the way things work but not the way they are.

It is my view that the underlying moral schism that contributed to these extreme manifestations of evil has also conditioned our civilization to insulate its conscience from any responsibility for the collective endeavors that invisibly link millions of small, silent, banal acts and omissions together in a pattern of terrible cause and effect. Today, we enthusiastically participate in what is in essence a massive and unprecedented experiment with the natural systems of the global environment, with little regard for the moral consequences. But for the separation of science and religion, we might not be pumping so much gaseous chemical waste into the atmosphere and threatening the destruction of the earth's climate balance. But for the separation of useful technological know-how and the moral judgments to guide its use, we might not be slashing and burning one football field's worth of rain forest every second. But for the assumed separation of humankind from nature, we might not be destroying half the living species on earth in the space of a single lifetime. But for the separation of thinking and feeling, we might not tolerate the deaths everyday of 37,000 children under the age of five from starvation and preventable diseases made worse by failures of crops and politics.
—Al Gore, Earth in the Balance, 1992

Source: Quotations Collected by David Conner, Part 2

Posted by niganit at 7:02 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Profound | Teaching

December 12, 2007

More Nothing Than Something

An atom (and thus all matter) is mostly empty space.
—Encyclopedia Britannica

Contrary to our perception and belief, there is more nothing than something, even in things that appear to have more something than nothing.
—Peter McWilliams

Everything is always in motion, even things that don't appear to have moved in millions of years.
—Peter McWilliams

The perception that things are solid and stationary is an illusion.
—Peter McWilliams

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2

Posted by niganit at 7:04 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Profound | Teaching

November 1, 2007

No Mistakes; No Discoveries

We learn wisdom from failure much more than from success.
We often discover what will do by finding out what will not do;
and probably he who never made a mistake, never made a discovery.
—Samuel Smiles

Source: Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail Again. Fail Better. Herter Studio. Running Press. 2006 ISBN 13: 978-0-7624-2514-3

Posted by niganit at 10:11 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Motivating | Profound | Teaching

October 31, 2007

Making Mistakes and Feeling Good About Them

While one person hesitates because he feels inferior; the other is busy making mistakes and becoming superior.
—Henry C. Link

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2

Posted by niganit at 9:20 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Teaching

September 26, 2007

Our Own Behavior

We create our fate every day . . . most of the ills we suffer from are directly traceable to our own behavior.
—Henry Miller

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8

Posted by niganit at 10:36 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Profound | Teaching

August 5, 2007

Is There Good Judment in Politics?

Good judgment in politics, it turns out, depends on being a critical judge of yourself. It was not merely that the president did not take the care to understand Iraq. He also did not take the care to understand himself. The sense of reality that might have saved him from catastrophe would have taken the form of some warning bell sounding inside, alerting him that he did not know what he was doing. But then, it is doubtful that warning bells had ever sounded in him before. He had led a charmed life, and in charmed lives warning bells do not sound.

People with good judgment listen to warning bells within. Prudent leaders force themselves to listen equally to advocates and opponents of the course of action they are thinking of pursuing. They do not suppose that their own good intentions will guarantee good results. They do not suppose they know all they need to know. If power corrupts, it corrupts this sixth sense of personal limitation on which prudence relies.

A prudent leader will save democracies from the worst, but prudent leaders will not inspire a democracy to give its best. Democratic peoples should always be looking for something more than prudence in a leader: daring, vision and — what goes with both — a willingness to risk failure. Daring leaders can be trusted as long as they give some inkling of knowing what it is to fail. They must be men of sorrow acquainted with grief, as the prophet Isaiah says, men and women who have not led charmed lives, who understand us as we really are, who have never given up hope and who know they are in politics to make their country better. These are the leaders whose judgment, even if sometimes wrong, will still prove worthy of trust.
—Michael Ignatieff

Source: Getting Iraq Wrong [requires paid subscription] by Michael Ignatieff published August 5, 2007 in the New York Times Magazine.

Posted by niganit at 10:11 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Motivating | Profound | Sadness | Teaching

July 20, 2007

Three "Rs" Enough?

The three Rs — reading, 'riting, and 'rithmetic — are no longer enough. We must add the three C's — computing, critical thinking, and capacity for change.
—Fred Gluck, former manager director, McKinsey & Co.

Source: Number 164: The Pursuit of WOW!: Every Person's Guide to Topsy-Turvy Times by Tom Peters Vintage 1994. ISBN: 0-679-75555-1

Posted by niganit at 1:17 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Teaching

June 18, 2007

Give & Take in Life

The idea that life is take, take, take (learn, learn, learn) needs to be balanced with the idea that life is also giving (teaching). Receiving and giving (learning and teaching) are two parts of a single flow, like breathing in (receiving) and breathing out (giving). One cannot take place without the other.
—Peter McWilliams

Life is something like a trumpet.
If you don't put anything in,
you won't get anything out.
—W. C. Handy

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2
See also:
⇒ University of North Alabama Library's W. C. Handy Biography
Memorial for Peter McWilliams, 1950—2000

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By age: 34-year-olds
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.

Posted by niganit at 8:18 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Profound | Teaching

June 7, 2007

Is This the Best Part of Your Life?

We hear that youth is wasted on the young. People who say this are accepting the myth that only the young can enjoy life to the fullest. The truth is that older people do not consider their young days to be their best days; most enjoy their senior years more than any other part of their life.
—David Niven, Ph.D. in You have not finished the best part of your life.: Number 98 of The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People

Researchers conducted a long-term study of Northern Californians, interviewing subjects multiple times over three decades. When asked when they had been the happiest in their lives, each time eight out of ten answered "right now."
—Field D. 1997. "Looking Back, What Period of Your Life Brought You the Most Satisfaction?." International Journal of Aging and Human Development 45: 169.

Source: The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People: What Scientists Have Learned and How You Can Use It. by David Niven, Ph.D. 2000 HarperCollins ISBN: 0-06-251650-7
See also: Country Inns & Suites by Carlson Read & Return It program.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By age: 33-year-olds
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

My daughter, Jennifer, celebrates her thirty-third birthday this month.

Posted by niganit at 8:57 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Motivating | Profound | Teaching

June 1, 2007

Don't Give Up the Ship

ddg4_1973_05_04.jpg

US Navy Historical Center

USS Lawrence (DDG-4) underway

USS Lawrence (DDG-4) underway near Cape Henry, VA May 3, 1973. DDG-4 was one of five US Navy ships named in honor of Captain James Lawrence, War of 1812 naval hero.

Fight her 'til she sinks and don't give up the ship
—James Lawrence, Captain, USN

Source: New York Times On This Day for June 1, 2007: See 1813.
See also:
⇒ Wikipedia's James Lawrence.
⇒ Wikipedia's USS Chesapeake.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By Age / 25-year-olds
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

Posted by niganit at 8:46 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Teaching

May 23, 2007

Letters We Should Have Burned

'Lives' of great men oft remind us as we o'er their pages turn,
That we too many leave behind us –
Letters that we ought to burn.
—Thomas Hood

Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, May 23, 2007.
See also:
⇒ Wikipedia's Thomas Hood who was born on this day in London in 1799. He died on May 3, 1845 in Camberwell, England.
⇒ Consider This March 10, 2004 entry Lives Sublime quote by Longfellow.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By Age / 23-year-olds
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

Posted by niganit at 8:56 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Poetry | Teaching

May 16, 2007

You Count

When you become part of something, in some way you count. It could be a march; it could be a rally, even a brief one. You're part of something, and you suddenly realize you count. To count is very important.
—Studs Terkel

Source: BrainyQuote.com's Studs Terkel Quotes.
It is the birthday of StudsTerkel, born Louis Terkel in the Bronx, New York City in 1912.
See also:
⇒ Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, May 16, 2007.
⇒ Wikipedia.org's Studs Terkel

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By Age / 21-year-olds
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

Posted by niganit at 9:00 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Profound | Teaching

May 7, 2007

Can Dogs Please?

When signs go up saying "No dogs please", only one person in a thousand bothers to point out that actually, as a statement, "no dogs please" is an indefensible generalisation, since many dogs do please, as a matter of fact; they rather make a point of it.
—Lynne Truss in her book Eats, Shoots & Leaves

Source: Eats, Shoots & Leaves daily calendar, Thursday, May 3, 2007 entry.
See also:
Lynne Truss's Home page and;
⇒ Her Eats, Shoots & Leaves page.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By Age / 18-year-olds
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

Posted by niganit at 9:05 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Humorous | Lynn Truss | Punctuation | Teaching

May 3, 2007

Pleasure of Reading

The pleasure we derive from the written word is unique in that we must labor for it. Other forms of art provide us with stimulus and ask nothing more than our emotional response. Reading is an active pastime that requires an investment of emotion as well as our concentration and imagination.
—extract from the DailyOM for Thursday, May 3, 2007

Source: For the entire contemplation visit: DailyOM A Whole New World: Reading For Pleasure published Thursday, May 3, 2007.

Posted by niganit at 9:34 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: DailyOM | Profound | Teaching

April 30, 2007

The experiment entrusted to American People

I dwell on this prospect with every satisfaction which an ardent love for my country can inspire, since there is no truth more thoroughly established than that there exists in the economy and course of nature an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness; between duty and advantage; between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity; since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty and the destiny of the republican model of government are justly considered, perhaps, as deeply, as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.
—President George Washington, New York City, April 30, 1789

Source: Yale Law School's, The Avalon Project First Inaugural Address of George Washington.
See also:
⇒ Library of Congress Presidential Inaugurations George Washington, First Inauguration, April 30, 1789.
⇒ White House's Biography of George Washington.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: Marines
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 25, 2007

ANZAC Day, 2007

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
—John McCrae

Source: Australian War Memorial's Commemoration customs of ANZAC Day, April 25th.
⇒ ANZAC Day - 25 April - is probably Australia's most important national occasion. It marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The soldiers in those forces quickly became known as ANZACs, and the pride they soon took in that name endures to this day.

When war broke out in 1914 Australia had been a federal commonwealth for only fourteen years. The new national government was eager to establish its reputation among the nations of the world. In 1915 Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli peninsula to open the way to the Black Sea for the allied navies. The plan was to capture Constantinople (now Istanbul), capital of the Ottoman Empire and an ally of Germany. They landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Turkish defenders.
See: Australian War Memorial The Anzac Day Tradition [Australian War Memorial]

⇒ On this Anzac Day, April 25, 2007, I honor the memory of my Uncle Fred, my Mom's brother, who served in the RAAF during World War II and his service to Australia. Years later on a visit to the states, Uncle Fred and my Dad (who served in the US Army in the Pacific Theater) comparing notes discovered that they had been in the same place in New Guinea at the same time during the War. A small world indeed!
⇒ I also honor the service of all the men and women who served in the defence of Australia, particularly the RAN naval officers and RAN public servants I had the privilege of serving with in the late 1980's at Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, DC.

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April 24, 2007

Truth: Truth?

Say not, 'This is the truth' but 'So it seems to me to be as I now see things I think I see.'
—Unknown – Above a doorway at the German Naval Officers School, in Kiel

Source: John McPhee Annals of the Former World, Farrar, Straus and Giroux (FSG), New York, 2000, p.356 ISBN-13: 978-0-374-51873-8
www.johmmcphee.com
⇒ John McPhee's page for Annals of the Former World.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By Date / 2007
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 23, 2007

Women and the Glass Ceiling

Mr. President, I don't know why it took us 200 years for one of us to get the job [of ambassador].
—Shirley Temple Black

Source: Creative Quotations from Shirley Temple Black
⇒ Shirley Temple Black was born on this day in 1928 in Santa Monica, California.
⇒ See WikiPedia's Shirley Temple.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: Air Force
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 20, 2007

Punctuation Can Make a Difference!

Consider the difference:
"The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness:
Prepare ye the way of the Lord." And:
"The voice of him that crieth:
In the wilderness prepare ye the way of the Lord."
—Lynne Truss in her book Eats, Shoots & Leaves

Source: Eats, Shoots & Leaves daily calendar, Thursday, April 20, 2007 entry.
See also:
Lynne Truss's Home page and;
⇒ Her Eats, Shoots & Leaves page.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: By Age / 50-year-olds and older
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 11, 2007

Apostrophe Abolition

The day after the abolition of the apostrophe, imagine the scene. Triumphant abolitionist sits down to write, "Goodbye to the apostrophe, we're not missing you a bit!" and finds that he can't.
—Lynne Truss in her book Eats, Shoots & Leaves

Source: Eats, Shoots & Leaves daily calendar, Saturday, April 7, 2007 entry.
See also:
Lynne Truss's Home page and;
⇒ Her Eats, Shoots & Leaves page.

April 10, 2007

My Father, So Ignorant; When I Was 14

When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much he had learned in seven years.
—Mark Twain, "Old Times on the Mississippi" Atlantic Monthly, 1874

Source: QuoteGarden.com's Father Quotes, Sayings about Fathers.
⇒ The Mark Twain House and Museum's The Man | Biography.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: Navy
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 4, 2007

Universe Out of Control

Understand that the universe
is forever out of control,
and that trying to dominate events
goes against the river's current.
If you believe in yourself,
will you need the belief of others?
If you are content with yourself,
will you need the approval of others?
If you accept yourself,
who will not accept you?
—Tao Te Ching

Source: Professor Frank Pajares Home at Emory University, and specifically, his Tao Te Ching page.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: Coast Guard
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 2, 2007

Teaching & Learning?

What a teacher thinks she is teaching often has little to do with what students learn.
—Susan Ohanian

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also:
Susan Ohanian Speaksout.

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March 19, 2007

Knowledge vs. Wisdom

Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit,
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
—Ruba

Source: Ruba's Profile [requires free registration] on Sitepoint forums.

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March 15, 2007

Run for It

What I admire is her optimism. Rationally considered, she could not have packed all her stuff into the house in one trip. But there are times when people will not accept rational limitations. Go for it. Because you just might pull it off. And she did. Mostly.

What's this about?
In such moments as these I see the pilot light of reckless courage fire reserves of fuel to meet the small challenges of daily life. A stubborn refusal to accept obvious limitations. A delight in taking risks and defying odds. She didn't notice me across the street. It wasn't a performance, but an innate personal response to a challenge. It's a miniscule example of what's brought to bear in far more heroic situations. People run into burning buildings to save a life out of the same inclination. It's just a matter of scale.

That's a good thing about us. Something to like. What seems improbable just might be possible. More often than not, given the options, we don't play it safe and dry. We run for it.
—Robert Fulghum

Source: RUN FOR IT published March 05, 2007, Written Sunday, March 4, 2007 Seattle, Washington by Robert Fulghum.

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March 8, 2007

Protecting Free Thought We Hate

If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
—Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Source: BrainyQuote's Oliver Wendell Holmes Quotes
⇒ Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. was born on this day in 1841, in Boston, Massachusetts. He died of pneumonia in Washington, D.C. on March 6, 1935.
⇒ See his New York Times Obituary, Washington Holds Bright Memories of Justice Holmes's Long and Useful Life.
⇒ Also, Arlington National Cemetery's biography, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Captain and Brevet Colonel, U.S. Army, Associate Justice, U.S. Supreme Court.

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March 6, 2007

150 Years Since the Horrid Dred Scott Decision

The words 'people of the United States' and 'citizens' are synonymous terms, and mean the same thing. They both describe the political body who, according to our republican institutions, form the sovereignty, and who hold the power and conduct the Government through their representatives. They are what we familiarly call the 'sovereign people,' and every citizen is one of this people, and a constituent member of this sovereignty. The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word 'citizens' in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate [60 U.S. 393, 405] and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.
—Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, March 6, 1857

Source: U.S. Supreme Court DRED SCOTT v. SANDFORD, 60 U.S. 393 (1856) on FindLaw.com
Dred Scott Decision on the US National Archives and Records Administration Web site.
⇒ "The decision of Scott v. Sandford, considered by legal scholars to be the worst ever rendered by the Supreme Court, was overturned by the 13th and 14th amendments to the Constitution, which abolished slavery and declared all persons born in the United States to be citizens of the United States."—US National Archives and Records Administration
Dred Scott Case Collection of the Washington University in Saint Louis.

March 4, 2007

Teaching and Learning

Men learn while they teach.
—Seneca

Source: March 4st entry: Office Perpetual Calendar by Judy Johannesen, Haymarket, Virginia

Posted by niganit at 3:35 PM | Comments (0)
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February 16, 2007

Every Relationship is Different

If you've been disappointed by strained relations with a friend or loved one, you must realize that each relationship is unique. Don't let tensions with one person convince you that you lack the ability to be a good friend or a loving family member.
—David Niven, Ph.D. in Every Relationship is Different: Number 28 of The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People

Researchers found there were no differences in overall happiness between those who mainly relyed upon friends for companionship and those who maily relied upon family. People have the capacity to create happiness from the relationships available to them and do not need all their relationships to fit an ideal image.
—Takahashi, K., J. Tamura, and M. Tokoro. 1997. "Patterns of Social Relationships and Psychological Well-Being Among the Elderly" International Journal of Behavioral Development 21:417.

Source: The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People: What Scientists Have Learned and How You Can Use It. by David Niven, Ph.D. 2000 HarperCollins ISBN: 0-06-251650-7
See also: Country Inns & Suites by Carlson Read & Return It program.

Posted by niganit at 7:58 AM | Comments (0)
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January 30, 2007

Happy Birthday, FDR

In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms.

The first is freedom of speech and expression--everywhere in the world.

The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way--everywhere in the world.

The third is freedom from want--which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants-everywhere in the world.

The fourth is freedom from fear--which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor--anywhere in the world.

That is no vision of a distant millennium. It is a definite basis for a kind of world attainable in our own time and generation. That kind of world is the very antithesis of the so-called new order of tyranny which the dictators seek to create with the crash of a bomb.
—Franklin D. Roosevelt

Source: Annual Message to Congress, January 6, 1941 [commonly referred to as the Four Freedoms Speech] by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Thirty-Second President 1933-1945.
President Roosevelt was born on this day in 1882 in Hyde Park, New York. He died: April 12, 1945 in Warm Springs, Georgia.
See WhiteHouse.gov's very short biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

January 3, 2007

On Exporting Democracy

Because of our basic unity, we can afford to be divided on specific issues. Democracy is about differences and contesting them in the public sphere, and it only works when there is basic agreement about the fundamentals. We should feel fortunate that we have a democratic history and set of beliefs. Those beliefs can be imported by those who want them and dont have them, but they cant be exported. We can only create a context where others would want to import them.
—Michael Mandelbaum in his book, The Case for Goliath

Source: A Hanging and a Funeral by Thomas L. Friedman published in the New York Times, Wednesday, January 3, 2007. [requires registration and subscription for op-ed piece]
See also:
The Case for Goliath: How American Acts as the World's Government in the Twenty-First Century by Michael Mandelbaum at Powell's Books.

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December 4, 2006

Forgiveness

Understanding is often a prelude to forgiveness, but they are not the same, and we often forgive what we cannot understand (seeing nothing else to do) and understand what we cannot pardon.
—Mary McCarthy (1912 - 1989) US novelist, critic

Source: The Writing on the Wall and Other Literary Essays; on Creative Quotations by Mary McCarthy See also:
»
Mary McCarthy on Wikipedia
» Featured Author: Mary McCarthy on the New York Times online. [Requires free registration and log-in]

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Love and Gratitude of George Washington

With a heart full of love and gratitude I now take leave of you. I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorableIshall feel obliged if each of you will come and take me by the hand.
—General George Washington

Source: Washington's farewell to his officers, December 4, 1783, as he received the officers of the victorious Continental Army in the Long Room of Fraunces Tavern, on the corner of Pearl and Broad Streets, in lower Manhattan, New York City.
See also:
» Fraunces Tavern Museum article Washington Said Farewell To Officers At Fraunces Tavern At War's End
» Library of Congress American Memory for Today in History: December 04

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December 1, 2006

Cannot Escape History

Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. We of this Congress and this Administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation. We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We know how to save the Union. The world knows we do know how to save it.

We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free,--honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last, best hope of earth. Other means may succeed; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just,--a way which, if followed, the world will forever applaud, and God must forever bless.
—Abraham Lincoln

Source: State of the Union Address to United States Congress by President Abraham Lincoln on December 1, 1862. These are President Lincoln's concluding paragraphs to this address.
See: State of the Union Addresses by Abraham Lincoln at the Gutenberg Project
See also: Biography of Abraham Lincoln at WhiteHouse.gov.

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November 28, 2006

Believe in Freedom of Speech?

If we don't believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don't believe in it at all.
—Noam Chomsky

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: The Noam Chomsky Web site

Posted by niganit at 8:26 AM | Comments (0)
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November 27, 2006

Rains All the Time?

For all the fame of the rain in this soggy city, conversations about climate often lead to local defensiveness: Seattle, which averages about 38 inches of rain annually, is far from the countrys wettest big city. Atlanta, Boston, Houston, Miami and New York are just some of the others that get more rain.
—New York Times byline – SEATTLE, Nov. 26

Source: New York Times article Seattle Journal: City That Takes Rain in Stride Puts on Hip Boots published Monday, November 26, 2006. [Requires registration.]
See also: Rains All the Time: A Connoisseur's History of Weather in the Pacific Northwest by David Laskin Sasquatch Books June 1997 ISBN: 1570610630

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November 24, 2006

Life: Your Teacher

The people and situations we encounter every day have much to teach us when we are open to receiving their wisdom. Often we don't recognize our teachers because they may not look or act like our idea of a guru, yet they may embody great wisdom. In addition, some people teach us by showing us what we don't want to do. All the situations in our lives, from the insignificant to the major, conspire to teach us exactly what we need to be learning at any given time. Patience, compassion, perseverance, honesty, letting go-all these are covered in the classroom of the teacher that is your life.
—extract from the DailyOM for Friday, November 24, 2006

Source: For the entire contemplation visit: DailyOM Life: Your Perfect Teacher published November 24, 2006

Posted by niganit at 8:38 AM | Comments (0)
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November 9, 2006

Kristallnacht: Lest We Forget the Horror

Today is the anniversary of Kristallnacht, the night in 1938 when German Nazis coordinated a nationwide attack on Jewish homes, businesses, and synagogues. It's generally considered the official beginning of the Holocaust. Before that night, the Nazis had killed people secretly and individually. After Kristallnacht, the Nazis felt free to persecute the Jews openly, because they knew no one would stop them.
—Garrison Keillor

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, November 9, 2006
See also: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Kristallnacht: The November 1938 Pogroms

Posted by niganit at 7:48 AM | Comments (0)
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October 30, 2006

Contracting Before Expanding

Sometimes our lives contract before they expand. We may be working hard on ourselves spiritually, doing good in the world, following our dreams, and wondering why we are still facing constrictions of all kinds-financial, emotional, physical. Perhaps we even feel as if we've lost our spirituality and are stuck in a dark room with no windows. We may be confused and discouraged by what appears to be a lack of progress. But sometimes this is the way things work. Like a caterpillar that confines itself to a tiny cocoon before it grows wings and flies, we are experiencing the darkness before the dawn.
—extract from the DailyOM for Monday, October 30, 2006

Source: For the entire contemplation visit: DailyOM Going Through The Opening: Contracting Before Expanding published October 30, 2006

Posted by niganit at 7:41 AM | Comments (0)
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October 24, 2006

See Things For What They are

Circumstances do not rise to meet our expectations. Events happen as they do. People behave as they are. Embrace what you actually get.

Open your eyes: See things for what they really are, thereby sparing yourself the pain of false attachments and avoidable devastation.

When something happens, the only thing in your power is your attitude toward it; you can either accept it or resent it.

Things and people are not what we wish them to be nor what they seem to be. They are what they are.
—Epictetus

Source: page 7 of The Art of Living: The Classic Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness: A New Interpretation by Sharon Lebell 1995 by Sharon Lebell HarperSanFrancisco ISBN: 006-251322-2(cloth)
See also: The Internet Encylcopedia of Philosphy's Epictetus

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October 10, 2006

Happy Birthday, US Naval Academy

On September 13, 1842, the American Brig Somers set sail from the Brooklyn Navy Yard on one of the most significant cruises in American naval history. It was a school ship for the training of teenage naval apprentice volunteers who would hopefully be inspired to make the Navy a career.

However, discipline deteriorated on the Somers and it was determined by a court of inquiry aboard ship that Midshipman Philip Spencer and his two chief confederates, Boatswains Mate Samuel Cromwell and Seaman Elisha Small, were guilty of a "determined attempt to commit a mutiny."

The three were hanged at the yardarm and the incident cast doubt over the wisdom of sending midshipmen directly aboard ship to learn by doing. News of the Somers mutiny shocked the country.

Through the efforts of the Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft, the Naval School was established without Congressional funding, at a 10-acre Army post named Fort Severn in Annapolis, Maryland, on October 10, 1845, with a class of 50 midshipmen and seven professors. The curriculum included mathematics and navigation, gunnery and steam, chemistry, English, natural philosophy, and French.

In 1850 the Naval School became the United States Naval Academy. A new curriculum went into effect requiring midshipmen to study at the Academy for four years and to train aboard ships each summer. That format is the basis of a far more advanced and sophisticated curriculum at the Naval Academy today. As the U.S. Navy grew over the years, the Academy expanded. The campus of 10 acres increased to 338. The original student body of 50 midshipmen grew to a brigade size of 4,000. Modern granite buildings replaced the old wooden structures of Fort Severn.
—USNA's A Brief History of the United States Naval Academy

Source: USNA's A Brief History of the United States Naval Academy

Posted by niganit at 7:17 AM | Comments (0)
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October 5, 2006

Honesty and Truth

When we promise more than we can deliver, hide from the consequences of our actions through falsehoods, or deny our true selves to others, we hurt those who were counting on us by proving that their faith was wrongly given. We are also hurt by the lies we tell and the promises we break. Integrity is the foundation of civilization, allowing people to live, work, and play side by side without fear or apprehension.
—DailyOM for Thursday, October 5, 2006

Source: DailyOM Power In Honesty: Staying True to Your Word published October 5, 2006

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October 4, 2006

Political Party's Power

History suggests that once a political party achieves sweeping power, it will only be a matter of time before the power becomes the entire point. Policy, ideology, ethics all gradually fall away, replaced by a political machine that exists to win elections and dispense the goodies that come as a result.
—New York Times editorial page

Source: New York Times editorial The Foley Matter published October 3, 2006 [Requires registration and log-in]

Posted by niganit at 8:27 AM | Comments (0)
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September 24, 2006

Facing Facts on Iraq

While Iraq is a central issue in this years election campaigns, there is very little clear talk about what to do, beyond vague recommendations for staying the course or long-term timetables for withdrawal. That is because politicians running for election want to deliver good news, and there is nothing about Iraq including withdrawal scenarios that is anything but ominous.

In the real Iraq, armed Shiite and Kurdish parties have divided up the eastern two-thirds of the country, leaving Sunni insurgents and American marines to fight over the rest. Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki and his national unity cabinet stretch out their arms to like-thinking allies like Iran and Hezbollah, but barely lift a finger to rein in the sectarian militias and death squads spreading terror across Baghdad and the Shiite south.

The civilian death toll is now running at roughly 100 a day, with many of the victims gruesomely tortured with power tools or acid. Over the summer, more Iraqi civilians died violent deaths each month than the number of Americans lost to terrorism on Sept. 11. Meanwhile, the electricity remains off, oil production depressed, unemployment pervasive and basic services hard to find.

Iraq is today a broken, war-torn country. Outside the relatively stable Kurdish northeast, virtually every family Sunni or Shiite, rich or poor, powerful or powerless must cope with fear and physical insecurity on an almost daily basis. The courts, when they function at all, are subject to political interference; street-corner justice is filling the vacuum. Religious courts are asserting their power over family life. Womens rights are in retreat.

Growing violence, not growing democracy, is the dominant feature of Iraqi life. Every Iraqi knows this. Americans need to know it too.

Beyond the futility of simply staying the course lies the impossibility of keeping the bulk of American ground forces stationed in Iraq indefinitely. They have already been there for 42 months, longer than it took the United States to defeat Hitler. The strain is undermining the long-term strength of the Army and Marines, threatening to divert the National Guard from homeland security and emboldening Iran and North Korea. Yet with the military situation deteriorating, the Pentagon has had to give up any idea of significant withdrawals this year, or for that matter anytime in the foreseeable future.
—excerpt of a New York Times Editorial, published Sunday, September 24, 2006.

Source: New York Times Editorial, Facing Facts on Iraq of Sunday, September 24, 2006

On September 23, 2006, a Washington Post editorial observed, in part:
The president's steadfastness would be much more impressive if it seemed to be attached to a winning strategy. Sadly, the events of the past several weeks suggest otherwise, at least in Iraq. Gen. Abizaid candidly described the progress of a U.S. military campaign in Baghdad, where additional American forces have been concentrated in the hope of stopping rampant sectarian bloodshed, as slight. Asked by reporters if the war could be won, he replied, "Given unlimited time and unlimited support, we're winning the war."

The problem, as both Gen. Abizaid and Mr. Bush well know, is that neither time nor resources are unlimited. Reports in several newspapers yesterday said the continuing heavy deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan had prompted commanders to discuss whether to call up more National Guard units at the expense of breaking rules about how often they are deployed.

The same day Gen. Abizaid spoke, the chairmen of a bipartisan Iraq study group set up by Congress delivered a blunt message to the four-month-old Iraqi coalition government, which has been slow to take desperately needed steps toward national reconciliation. "The government of Iraq needs to show its own citizens soon, and the citizens of the United States, that it is deserving of continuing support," said former representative Lee H. Hamilton, who chairs the group along with former secretary of state James A. Baker III.

Unless that message is heeded, the sacrifice involved in holding U.S. troop levels steady for another six months -- in lives, above all -- is likely to be wasted.
—excerpt of Washington Post editorial published September 23, 2006.

Source: Washington Post editorial The Troops Stay On of September 23, 2006

September 19, 2006

Washington's Farwell to the Nation

To the efficacy and permanency of your union a government for the whole is indispensable. No alliances, however strict, between the parts can be an adequate substitute. They must inevitably experience the infractions and interruptions which all alliances in all times have experienced. Sensible of this momentous truth, you have improved upon your first essay by the adoption of a Constitution of Government better calculated than your former for an intimate union and for the efficacious management of your common concerns. This Government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its powers, uniting security with energy, and containing within itself a provision for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acquiescence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental maxims of true liberty. The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the constitution which at any time exists till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government...

Toward the preservation of your Government and the permanency of your present happy state, it is requisite not only that you steadily discountenance irregular oppositions to its acknowledged authority, but also that you resist with care the spirit of innovation upon its principles, however specious the pretexts. One method of assault may be to effect in the forms of the Constitution alterations which will impair the energy of the system, and thus to undermine what can not be directly overthrown. In all the changes to which you may be invited remember that time and habit are at least as necessary to fix the true character of governments as of other human institutions; that experience is the surest standard by which to test the real tendency of the existing constitution of a country; that facility in changes upon the credit of mere hypothesis and opinion exposes to perpetual change, from the endless variety of hypothesis and opinion; and remember especially that for the efficient management of your common interests in a country so extensive as ours a government of as much vigor as is consistent with the perfect security of liberty is indispensable. Liberty itself will find in such a government, with powers properly distributed and adjusted, its surest guardian. It is, indeed, little else than a name where the government is too feeble to withstand the enterprises of faction, to con-fine each member of the society within the limits prescribed by the laws, and to maintain all in the secure and tranquil enjoyment of the rights of person and property.
—President George Washington, excerpt from his letter of September 17, 1796

Source: U.S. State Department's Basic Readings in Democracy, FAREWELL ADDRESS (1796), George Washington
Although his farewell was never given orally by the President, it was first published in Philadelphia's American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796. It was subsequently published in many newspapers throughout the United States
The U.S. Senate has had a tradition since 1896 of reading the President's Farewell on his birthday, February 22nd in legislative session, according to the Senate's Art & History History Minutes.
I think this excerpt is particularly pertinent to the September 2006 debates before the House and Senate regarding President George W. Bush's proposed Military Commissions legislation.

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September 12, 2006

Young Not Prudent and That's Fortunate for All

The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore they attempt the impossible
–and achieve it, generation after generation.
—Pearl S. Buck, 1892-1973, Pulitzer (1932) and Nobel Prize (1938) Winning Author

Source: Pearl S. Buck on Achieving the Impossible of Sep. 12, 2006 at Brainfuel.tv
See also: Pearl Buck – Biography at NobelPrize.org
Also: Pearl Buck was awarded the 1932 Pulitzer Prize in Letters & Drama, Novel for The Good Earth, see: Pulitzer Prizes.org

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August 28, 2006

Hear a Little Song, Every Day

One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.
—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Monday, August 28, 2006
It is the birthday of Goethe, born this day in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, in 1749. Goethe died in Weimar on March 22, 1832.
Read a short biographical sketch of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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August 23, 2006

Intellect and Personality

We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality.
—Albert Einstein

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, July 27, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: Nobel Foundation's The Nobel Prize in Physics 1921 Albert Einstein — Biography

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August 14, 2006

Teaching Children to Think

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.
—Margaret Mead

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, August 5/6, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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August 7, 2006

Major Miracles

Teachers perform major miracles in America, daily.
—Meryl Streep

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, August 1, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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July 29, 2006

Democracy Really Works

F-14 last cat from CVN-71

USN | by MCSNSheldon Rowley

Final launch of the F-14 Tomcat

Atlantic Ocean (July 28, 2006) Aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), an F-14D Tomcat assigned to the "Tomcatters" of Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31), aircraft number 112, accelerates down the ships number three catapult during the final launch of an F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft. The last launch marks the end of an era for Naval Aviation. The F-14 will officially retire in September 2006, after 32 years of service to the fleet. Theodore Roosevelt is completing Joint Task Force Exercises with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). U.S. Navy Photo(RELEASED)

America demonstrates invincibly one thing that I had doubted up to now: that the middle classes can govern a State. ... Despite their small passions, their incomplete education, their vulgar habits, they can obviously provide a practical sort of intelligence and that turns out to be enough.
—Alexis de Tocqueville

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Saturday, July 29, 2006
Alexis de Tocqueville was born in Paris on this day in 1805. He died April 16, 1859 in Cannes.
See also: The Alexis de Tocqueville Tour Exploring Democracy in America

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July 25, 2006

A Young Man's Turning Point

Scout Oath
On my honor I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country
and to obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong,
mentally awake, and morally straight.

Scout Law
A Scout is:
Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
Reverent
—Boy Scouts of America

Source: Boy Scouts of America, National Council
Perhaps my nephew, Joe, will make the right moral and ethical choices to not follow a path of self destruction, but rather, a path of opportunity out of poverty.

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July 24, 2006

Good Teachers - Irreplaceable

If I were in charge of the universe, good teachers would earn far more than cabinet members; the latter are replaceable, the former are not.
—Phyllis Theroux

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, July 20, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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July 20, 2006

Finding Paths

If you can find a path with no obstacles, it probably doesn't lead anywhere.
—Frank A. Clark

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, June 17/18, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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July 18, 2006

Learn More

We learn more by looking for the answer to a question and not finding it than we do from learning the answer itself.
—Lloyd Alexander

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: Kidsread.com's Lloyd Alexander

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July 10, 2006

Get Meaning into Your Life, Redux

So many people walk around with a meaningless life. They seem half asleep, even when they're busy doing things they think are important. This is because they're chasing the wrong things.
The way you get meaning into your life is to devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to the community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.
—Morrie Schwartz

Source: Tuesdays with Morrie: an Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom 1st ed. 1997 by Doubleday ISBN: 0-385-48451-8
Secondary source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, July 8/9, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also:
Consider This' shorter version of Get Meaning into Year Life, published exactly a year ago!
FastCompany.com's November 1999 article Work and Life - Morrie Schwartz

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July 2, 2006

Stevenson's Resolution

I have resolved from this day on,
I will do all the business I can honestly,
have all the fun I can reasonably,
do all the good I can do willingly,
and save my digestion by thinking pleasantly.
—Robert Louis Stevenson

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, July 1/2, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: The Literature Network's Robert Louis Stevenson - Biography and Works

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June 20, 2006

Collaborate With Whom?

roadsign photo - collaborate

Seth Kahan 2006

Highway Collaboration

My dear brother and friend sent me this photo for our consideration! Seth is a Collaboration Specialist, Conference Keynote Speaker, and Executive Strategy Consultant. Visit www.sethkahan.com to learn more. Visit his blog: collaboratioNation.com

What all these stories tell me is that we are seeing the emergence of collaborative business models that were simply unimaginable a decade ago. Today, there are so many more tools, so many more ideas, so many more people able to put these ideas and tools together to discover new things, and so much better communications to disseminate these new ideas across the globe.

If more countries can get just a few basic things right enough telecom and bandwidth so their people can get connected; steadily improving education; decent, corruption-free economic governance; and the rule of law and we can find more sources of clean energy, there is every reason for optimism that we could see even faster global growth in this century, with many more people lifted out of poverty.
—Thomas L. Friedman: Outsourcing, Schmoutsourcing! Out Is Over New York Times, May 19, 2006

Source: Seth Kahan's blog, collaboratioNation.com 22 May 2006 entry.
See also Thomas L. Friedman: Outsourcing, Schmoutsourcing! Out Is Over New York Times, May 19, 2006 [requires registration & premium subscription]

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June 19, 2006

Can Anything Be Stupider?

Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
—Blaise Pascal

Source: BrainyQuote.com's Blasie Pascal Quotes
It's the birthday of mathematician and mystic Blaise Pascal, born in Clermont, France (1623).

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June 15, 2006

Nothing You Must Be

There is really nothing you must be.
And there is nothing you must do.
There is really nothing you must have.
And there is really nothing you must know.
There is really nothing you must become.
However. It helps to understand that fire burns, and when it rains, the earth gets wet...

'Whatever, there are consequences. Nobody is exempt,' said the master.
—Robert Fulghum

Source: It Was On Fire When I Lay Down On It by Robert Fulghum 1989 Villard Books ISBN 0-394-58056-7
See also: Robert Fulghum's Official Web site
See also: Marine Corps Heritage Foundation
This is my daughter Jennifer's 32nd birthday. I wish her love, peace, and courage. Happy birthday Jenn Marie!

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June 13, 2006

Among Substantial Things

Could we but give us wholly to the dreams,
And get into their world that to the sense
Is shadow, and not linger wretchedly
Among substantial things.
—William Butler Yeats, from his poem The Shadowy Waters, written in 1900

Source: W. B. Yeats Dead; Famous Irish Poet NY Times obituary January 30, 1939. Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland on this date, June 13, in 1865.
See also: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, June 13, 2006

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June 12, 2006

Can You Listen to Anything?

Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.
—Robert frost

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, June 10/11, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: The Academy of American Poets short Robert Frost bio.

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June 1, 2006

Ready to Learn

Personally, I'm always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.
—Winston S. Churchill

Source: Think Exist key word Learn quotes.

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May 30, 2006

Book of Life

'And what is as important as knowledge?' asked the mind.
'Caring and seeing with the heart,' answered the soul.
—Flavia

Source: A greeting card entitled Book of Life given to me by my Bride of eight years, my Sweet Carol Ruth, on the occasion of our eighth Wedding Anniversary. I love her so very much. We have found a joyful chorus of love in our lives now.
See also: About Flavia

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May 25, 2006

Meek Young Men: Think!

Meek young men grow up in libraries, believing it their duty to accept the views, which Cicero, which Locke, which Bacon, have given, forgetful that Cicero, Locke, and Bacon were only young men in libraries, when they wrote those books.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, May 25, 2006
It is the birthday of Ralph Waldo Emerson who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, USA in 1803.
Books by Emerson

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May 23, 2006

No Calling More Demanding

No calling in our society is more demanding than teaching; no calling in our society is more selfless than teaching; and no calling is more central to the vitality of a democracy than teaching.
—Roger Mudd

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, May 18, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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May 17, 2006

One Single Good Action

A teacher who can arouse a feeling for one good action, for one single good poem, accomplishes more than he who fills our memory with rows and rows of natural objects, classified with name and form.
—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, May 13/14, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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May 3, 2006

Teachers Open Doors

Teachers open the door, but you must enter yourself.
—Chinese proverb

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, May 2, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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April 30, 2006

Love Thrives When Manipulation Stops

Love comes when manipulation stops; when you think more about the other person than about his or her reactions to you. When you dare to reveal yourself fully. When you dare to be vulnerable.
—Dr. Joyce Brothers

Source: QuotationBooks.com's Dr. Joyce Brothers Quotation

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April 28, 2006

Sometimes Silence Impresses

Sometimes one creates a dynamic impression by saying something, and sometimes one creates as significant an impression by remaining silent.
—atributed to His Holiness, the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Wednesday, April 26, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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April 25, 2006

Bush's 1,000 Days

The Hundred Days is indelibly associated with Franklin D. Roosevelt, and the Thousand Days with John F. Kennedy. But as of this week, a thousand days remain of President Bush's last term -- days filled with ominous preparations for and dark rumors of a preventive war against Iran.

The issue of preventive war as a presidential prerogative is hardly new. In February 1848 Rep. Abraham Lincoln explained his opposition to the Mexican War: "Allow the President to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such purpose -- and you allow him to make war at pleasure [emphasis added]. . . . If, today, he should choose to say he thinks it necessary to invade Canada to prevent the British from invading us, how could you stop him? You may say to him, 'I see no probability of the British invading us'; but he will say to you, 'Be silent; I see it, if you don't.'"
—Arthur Schlesinger Jr.

Source: Arthur Schlesinger Jr.'s OP-ED Bush's 1,000 Days published April 24, 2006 in The Washington Post

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April 24, 2006

Presidents and Politicians Worry

Presidents and politicians may worry about losing face, or votes, or legacy; it is time to think about young Americans and innocent civilians who are losing their lives.
—John Kerry, US Senator, Massachusetts (D)

Source: Senator John Kerry's speech "Dissent" given in Faneuil Hall April 22, 2006, Boston, Massachusetts.

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April 18, 2006

Test of a Good Teacher

The test of a good teacher is not how many questions he can ask his students that they will answer readily, but how many questions he inspires them to ask which he finds it hard to answer.
—Alice Wellington Rollins

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, April 6, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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April 7, 2006

Men Abused and Battered

When I met Leo, Paul and Tom at a domestic violence shelter here, it was hard to believe the three men's story: that they were victims of physical abuse at the hands of their female partners.
—Ted Rowlands

Source: CNN.com article The other face of domestic violence by Ted Rowlands published Thursday, April 6, 2006
See also:
> Battered Men - The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence
835,000 men battered each year, silent too long ...
by MenWeb
> Domestic Violence Against Men in Colorado
> Domestic Abuse Hotline for Men and Women
> Abused Men: The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence by Phillip Cook
> Intimate Partner Violence: Fact Sheet by the CDC-National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

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April 3, 2006

Unsolvable Problems

We are continually faced with great opportunities, which are brilliantly disguised as unsolvable problems.
—Margaret Mead

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, March 30, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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March 31, 2006

Horror of Iraq

The fate of the entire U.S. enterprise in Iraq now hangs in the balance, as the war has entered a dangerous new phase. It is the phase of barbaric identity-card violence between Sunnis and Shiites. In the late 1970's, I covered a similar moment in Lebanon, and the one thing I learned was this: Once this kind of venom gets unleashed with members of each community literally beheading each other on the basis of their religious identities it poisons everything. You enter a realm that is beyond politics, a realm where fear and revenge dominate everyone's thinking and that is where Iraq is heading.  . . .
It is five minutes to midnight
—Thomas L. Friedman

Source: Thomas L. Friedman's New York Times Op-Ed Iraq at the 11th Hour Thursday, March 31, 2006.

This is the 24th birthday of my son, Nicholas Gerard. He was born in Houston, Texas on this day in 1982 and died the next day, April 1, 1982. I miss you so, my dear Nick, and in the arms of the angels, may you find some comfort there.
—Love, Dad

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March 27, 2006

Cherry Trees: Washington, DC

cherry blossoms in Washington DC

National Park Service

March 30, 2006. Cherry Blossoms at Peak Bloom: National Mall, Washington, DC

The Peak Bloom Date is defined as the day in which 70 percent of the blossoms of the Yoshino Cherry (Prunus x yedoensis) trees are open. The date when the Yoshino cherry blossoms reach peak bloom varies from year to year, depending on weather conditions. Cherry Blossom Festival dates are set based on the average date of blooming (April 4), but nature is not always cooperative. Unseasonably warm and/or cool temperatures have resulted in the Yoshino cherries reaching peak bloom as early as March 15 (1990) and as late as April 18 (1958).

On this day in 1912, President Taft's wife and the wife of the ambassador from Japan planted the first of Washington D.C.'s cherry trees. The cuttings were scions from the most famous trees in Tokyo, the ones that grow along the banks of the Arakawa River. Workers took over, and thousands of cherry treesall gifts from the Japanese governmentwere planted around the Tidal Basin. During the Second World War, Tokyo lost scores of cherry trees in the allied bombing raids; after the surrender, horticulturists took cuttings from the trees in Washington and sent them back to Tokyo. Years later, some of the Washington trees died, and Tokyo sent cuttings back across the Pacific.
—Garrison Keillor

Source: The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Monday, March 27th, 2006

 

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March 18, 2006

Education: A Definition

Education:
the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty.
—Mark Twain

Source: The Little Book of Humorous Quotation edited by Alison Bullivant 2004 Barnes & Noble Books ISBN 0-7607-3776-2

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March 14, 2006

Our Finest Moments

The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled. For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.
—M. Scott Peck

Source: Thinkexist.com's M. Scott Peck Quotes
See also: M. Scott Peck's biography on his "official" M. Scot Peck Web site

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March 13, 2006

Dedicated Life

The dedicated life is the life worth living. You must give with your whole heart.
—Annie Dillard

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, March 11/12, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

Posted by niganit at 7:49 AM | Comments (0)
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March 10, 2006

Do Not Believe (Revisited)

Do not believe what you have heard.
Do not believe in tradition because it is handed down many generations.
Do not believe in anything that has been spoken of many times.
Do not believe because the written statements come from some old sage.
Do not believe in conjecture.
Do not believe in authority or teachers or elders.
But after careful observation and analysis, when it agrees with reason and it will benefit one and all, then accept it and live by it.
---Buddha (563 B.C. -- 483 B.C.)

Source: Wisdom of the Ages: A Modern Master Brings Eternal Truth into Everyday Life by Wayne W. Dyer ISBN: 0-06-019231-3
Today is MY birthday. Thank you, Mom and Dad, for giving me life, and for being such wonderful, honest parents
This entry was originally posted on April 28, 2004 and has such deep and profound meaning to me that I thought it was altogether proper to repost here.

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March 6, 2006

Help Another and Help Oneself

It is one of the most beautiful compensations of life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, March 4/5, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (Online)

Posted by niganit at 8:38 AM | Comments (0)
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March 4, 2006

Men Learn

Men learn when they teach.
—Seneca

Source: March 3rd entry: Office Perpetual Calendar by Judy Johannesen, Haymarket, Virginia

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March 1, 2006

Flowing Beards Are All the Go

And now while round the shearing floor the listning shearers gape,
He tells the story oer and oer, and brags of his escape.
Them barber chaps what keeps a tote, By George, Ive had enough,
One tried to cut my bloomin throat, but thank the Lord its tough.
And whether hes believed or no, theres one thing to remark,
That flowing beards are all the go way up in Ironbark.
—A.B. "Banjo" Paterson from The Man From Ironbark

Source: THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER AND OTHER VERSES e-text online by OzLit@Vicnet
The poem was first published in The Bulletin (a weekly published in Sydney, Australia) on Dec. 17, 1892.

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February 26, 2006

Visual Learning

You can observe a lot just by watching.
—Yogi Berra

Source: quoted in Learn More Now: 10 Simple Steps to Learning Better, Smarter, and Faster by Marcia Conner
See also:
marciaconner.com
Ageless Learner: Curious for Life
Baseball Library's Yogi Berra

Posted by niganit at 7:52 PM | Comments (0)
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February 22, 2006

The Illiterate of the 21st Century

The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.
—Alvin Toffler

Source: quoted in Learn More Now: 10 Simple Steps to Learning Better, Smarter, and Faster by Marcia Conner
See also:
marciaconner.com
Ageless Learner: Curious for Life
Alvin Toffler on Wikipedia
Toffler Associates

Posted by niganit at 8:03 PM | Comments (0)
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February 15, 2006

Boldness Has Genius

What ever you can do,
or dream you can, begin it.
Boldness has genius,
power and magic in it.
—Johann von Goethe

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2
See also:
Roots.com's Goethe Biography
Memorial for Peter McWilliams, 1950—2000

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February 13, 2006

Touch Your Heart

When you begin to touch your heart or let your heart be touched, you begin to discover that it's bottomless, that it doesn't have any resolution, that this heart is huge, vast and limitless. You begin to discover how much warmth and gentleness is there, as well as how much space.
—Pema Chödrön

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, February 9, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also:
Gampo Abbey's Biography of Pema Chödrön
Ane Pema Chödrön

Posted by niganit at 8:26 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Love | Teaching

February 9, 2006

Fractions :-)

Question: Who invented fractions?
Answer: Henry the 1/8th.
—Unknown student

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Friday, February 3, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

Posted by niganit at 7:30 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Anonymous | Silly | Teaching

February 3, 2006

To Listen Fully

To listen fully means to pay close attention to what is being said beneath the words. You listen not only to the "music," but to the essence of the person speaking. You listen not only for what someone knows, but for what he or she is.
—Peter Senge

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, February 2, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: What is Enlightenment?'s online article Peter Senge: Bigraphy and Resources

Posted by niganit at 7:16 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Teaching

February 1, 2006

Done With Great Things

I am done with great things and big plans, great institutions and big success. I am for those tiny, invisible lovinghumna forces that work from individual to individual, creeping through the crannies of the world like so many rootlets, or like the capillary oozing of water, which, if given time, will rend the hardest monuments of pride.
—William James

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, January 31, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

Posted by niganit at 7:43 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Teaching

January 31, 2006

Presidential Criticism

The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.
—Theodore Roosevelt, Editorial in the newspaper Kansas City Star, May 7, 1918

Source: Quotations of Theodore Roosevelt by The Theodore Roosevelt Organization.

Posted by niganit at 7:30 AM | Comments (0)
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January 20, 2006

Understanding Heart in a Teacher

An understanding heart is everything in a teacher, and cannot be esteemed highly enough. One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feeling. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child
—Carl Jung

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, December 31, 2005 / January 1, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

Posted by niganit at 7:47 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Teaching

January 11, 2006

Theft From Those Who Hunger

Every gun that is made, every warship ever launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and not clothed.
—Dwight D Eisenhower

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: Dwight D. Eisenhower, The Chance for Peace speech, April 16, 1953 Washington, D.C. Social Justice Speeches Project of the Edchange.com Multicultural Education Pavilion

Posted by niganit at 9:33 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Profound | Sadness | Teaching

January 2, 2006

Knowledge and Wisdom

Abundance of knowledge does not teach men to be wise.
—Heraclitus

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, December 31, 2005 / January 1, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: Trinity College's The Window: Philosphy on the Internet:Heraclitus of Ephesus: Greek Philospher
[Trinity College, Hartford, CT, USA]

Posted by niganit at 7:34 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Ancient Thoughts | Famous People | Teaching

December 30, 2005

Teachers' Vulnerabilty

Teaching is a daily exercise in vulnerabilty.
—Parker Palmer

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, Thursday, December 29, 2005 entry
See also: explorefaith.org's Parker J. Palmer biographical sketch

Posted by niganit at 7:45 AM | Comments (0)
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December 26, 2005

In the Direction of Dreams

I have learned this at least in my experiement: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with success unexpected in common hours.
—Henry David Thoreau

Source: Teachers Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, December 24/25, 2005
See also: Literature Network's Biography of Henry David Thoreau

Posted by niganit at 7:16 AM | Comments (0)
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December 20, 2005

We Ask That You Don't

WE ASK THAT YOU DON'T:
Throw sand.
Be selfish.
Disparage others.
Talk shit.
Duck responsibility.
Play the busy card.
Leave others hanging.
Make excuses.
Disappear.
Make promises you don't keep.
Say it can't be done.

JUMPING ON HAND GRENADES.
There is usually a fairly large portion of work on each and every plate here. Getting all that work done in the time allotted can sometimes be a challenge, but our unwritten policy has always been to drop whatever we're doing when somebody needs our help. Maybe they will come right out and ask for help. Or maybe you just notice that something isn't getting done so you pitch in until it is done. The reason we do this is simple. The person you help today may be the person you need help from on that fateful day when a hand grenade rolls into your office.
—Crispin Porter + Bogusly, Miami Florida Ad Agency

Source: The Crispin Porter + Bogusly Employee Handbook
I really think these are wonderfully supportive direction!

Posted by niganit at 11:10 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Inspirational | Motivating | Teaching

December 19, 2005

Gravely Dangerous Actions

Warrantless intelligence surveillance by an executive branch unaccountable to any judicial officer -- and apparently on a large scale -- is gravely dangerous.
—Washington Post Editorial, Dec. 18, 2005

Source: Dec. 18th, 2005 Washington Post Editorial, Spying on Americans
See also: NY Times Nov 18, 2005 article Eavesdropping Effort Began Soon After Sept. 11 Attacks

Posted by niganit at 7:46 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Profound | Sadness | Teaching

December 1, 2005

One Person Is Missing

sometimes when one person is missing, the whole world seems depopulated.
—Alphonse de LaMartine

Source: quotablecards: A card given to me by my Heald college faculty colleagues, on my last day at the college, Dec. 1, 2005, a very lovely card indeed, and I am very, very grateful for their kind words of encouragement and gentle good-byes.
See also Wikipedia's Alphonse de LaMartine bio

Posted by niganit at 10:41 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Love | Teaching

November 29, 2005

Men and Women Doing New Things

The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done; men and women who are creative, inventive, and discoverers, who can be critical and verify, and not accept, everything they are offered.
—Jean Piaget

Source: Teachers Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, November 26/27, 2005
See also: Jean Piaget Society

Posted by niganit at 9:37 AM | Comments (0)
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November 23, 2005

Education: Not to Amuse Students!

Education is not to reform students or amuse them or to make them expert technicians. It is to unsettle their minds, widen their horizons, inflame their intellects, teach them to think straight, if possible.
—Robert M. Hutchins

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Tuesday, November 22, 2005

Posted by niganit at 9:03 AM | Comments (0)
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November 22, 2005

Men Who Question Power

JFK close-up photo Cronkite interview Sep. 2, 1963

NARA: ARC Identifier: 194259,

President interviewed by Walter Cronkite

President Kennedy ( close-up ). Hyannisport, MA, Squaw Island., 09/02/1963

The men who create power make an indispensable contribution to the Nations greatness, but the men who question power make a contribution just as indispensable, especially when that questioning is disinterested, for they determine whether we use power or power uses us.
—John F. Kennedy: Amherst College, Oct 26, 1963 - Source JFK Library, Boston, Mass.

Source: John F. Kennedy Quotations - the Quotation Pages

The President is shot
On November 21, 1963, President Kennedy flew to Texas to give several political speeches. The next day [November 22, 1963], as his car drove slowly past cheering crowds in Dallas, shots rang out. Kennedy was seriously wounded and died a short time later. Within a few hours of the shooting, police arrested Lee Harvey Oswald and charged him with the murder. On November 24, another man, Jack Ruby, shot and killed Oswald, thus silencing the only person who could have offered more information about this tragic event. The Warren Commission was organized to investigate the assassination and to clarify the many questions which remained.

Source: A Biography of John Fitzgerald Kennedy on the The John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library
See also: The National Archives - JFK Assassination Records Collection

Posted by niganit at 9:41 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Motivating | Sadness | Teaching

November 1, 2005

Babbage to Tennyson

US Navy photo EA-6B Prowler VAQ-135

US Navy photo PHAN Dominique V. Brown

An EA-6B Prowler of VAQ-135, Black Ravens

(Oct. 26, 2005) An EA-6B Prowler, assigned to the Black Ravens of Electronic Warfare Squadron One Three Five (VAQ-135), conducts a fly by during an air power demonstration rehearsal aboard USS NIMITZ (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is currently on a regularly scheduled deployment in the Pacific Ocean.

"Every minute dies a man, Every minute one is born;" I need hardly point out to you that this calculation would tend to keep the sum total of the world's population in a state of perpetual equipoise, whereas it is a well-known fact that the said sum total is constantly on the increase. I would therefore take the liberty of suggesting that in the next edition of your excellent poem the erroneous calculation to which I refer should be corrected as follows: "Every moment dies a man, And one and a sixteenth is born." I may add that the exact figures are 1.067, but something must, of course, be conceded to the laws of metre.
—Charles Babbage, letter to Alfred, Lord Tennyson, about a couplet in his The Vision of Sin, 1842

Source: Math Quotes at the Quote Garden
See also: Charles Babbage short bio on Pioneers @ KerryR

Posted by niganit at 7:21 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Teaching

October 31, 2005

Hell-broth Boil and Bubble

Round about the cauldron go:
In the poisoned entrails throw.
Toad, that under cold stone
Days and nights has thirty-one
Sweltered venom sleeping got
Boil thou first i' th' charmed pot !

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and trouble.

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
Cool it with a baboon's blood.
Then the charm is firm and good.
—William Shakespeare from Macbeth

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Monday, October 31, 2005 Halloween
See also: Poem of the Week (PotW.org) Double, Double Toil and Trouble — Shakespeare

Posted by niganit at 7:48 AM | Comments (1)
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October 30, 2005

The Work of a Teacher

The work of a teacher—exhausting, complex, idisyncratic, never twice the—is at its heart, an intellectual and ethical enterprise. Teaching is the vocation of vocations, a calling that shepherds a multitude of other callings. It is an activity that is intensely prcatical and yet transcendent, brutally matter-of-act, and yet fundamentally a creative act. Teaching begins in challenge and is never far from mystery.
—William Ayres

Source: Teachers Daily Inspirational Calendar Thursday, October 27th, 2005

Posted by niganit at 7:32 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Motivating | Profound | Teaching

October 26, 2005

Await the Result

When you have done your best, await the result in peace.
—Frank Vizarre

Source: Little Miracle series window card by Compendium, Inc.

Posted by niganit at 7:04 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Inspirational | Motivating | Teaching

October 11, 2005

Fail to Tap Ingenuity

There are young people out there cutting raw cocaine with chemicals from the local hardware store. They are manufacturing new highs and new products buy soaking marijuana in ever changing agents, and each of these new drugs is more addictive, more deadly and less costly than the last. How is it that we have failed to tap that ingenuity, that sense of experimentation? How is it that these kids who can measure grams and kilos and can figure out complex monetary transactions cannot pass a simple math or chemistry test?
—Senator Kohl, from the U.S. Senate Hearing: "Crisis in Math and Science Education."

Source: Teachers daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday June 5/6, 2004
See also: Senator Herb Khol (WI)

Posted by niganit at 9:16 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Sadness | Teaching

October 10, 2005

Obstacles in Our Way

When our next best course of action seems unclear, any dilemmas we face can appear insurmountable. Yet there is nothing we cannot overcome with time, persistence, focused thought, help, and faith. Whatever the situation or problem, there is always a solution. And if you remember to look within, even as you search around you for the "right" course of action, you will be able to center yourself, clear your mind, and see that nothing has to be impossible.
—Daily OM for Monday, October 10, 2005

Source: DailyOm, October 10, 2005 Overcoming Obstacles: Nothing Is Insurmountable

Posted by niganit at 7:44 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: DailyOM | Inspirational | Spiritual | Teaching

September 30, 2005

Deep Inside Us is Valuable

We do not believe in ourselves until someone reveals that what is deep inside us is valuable, worth listening to, worthy of our trust, sacred to our touch. Once we believe in ourselves we can risk curiosity, wonder, spontaneous delight, or any experience that reveals the human spirit.
—e.e. cummings

Source: Teachers Daily calendar Thursday, September 29, 2005 entry

Posted by niganit at 9:19 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Famous People | Inspirational | Profound | Teaching

September 18, 2005

Education's Aim?

The aim of education should be to teach us rather how to think, than what to think—rather to improve our minds, so as to enable us to think for ourselves, than to load the memory with the thoughts of other men.
—James Beattie

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday Ari 17/18, 2004

Posted by niganit at 1:24 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Motivating | Teaching

September 7, 2005

Entrusted Talent

Work while you have the light. You are responsible for the talent that has been entrusted to you.
—Henri Frederic Amiel

Source: Inspirational Calendar Monday, September 5, 2005 entry
See also: Henri Frederic Amiel on Wikipedia.org

Posted by niganit at 11:12 AM | Comments (0)
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August 9, 2005

Creativity and Courage

Creativity requires the courage to let go of certainties.
—Erich Fromm

Source: Creativity Quotes on Wisdom.com
See also: Erich Fromm on Wikipedia.org

This is my 300th entry! Yeah, me! :-)

Posted by niganit at 6:14 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Creative | Famous People | Inspirational | Teaching

July 28, 2005

Awakening A Pure Interest in Knowledge

If the colleges were better, if they really had it, you would need to get the police at the gates to keep order in the inrushing multitude. See in college how we thwart the natural love of learning by leaving the natural method of teaching what each wishes to learn, and insisting that you shall learn what you have no taste or capacity for. The college, which should be a place of delightful labor, is made odious and unhealthy, and the young men are tempted to frivolous amusements to rally their jaded spirits. I would have the studies elective. Scholarship is to be created not by compulsion, but by awakening a pure interest in knowledge. The wise instructor accomplishes this by opening to his pupils precisely the attractions the study has for himself. The marking is a system for schools, not for the college; for boys, not for men; and it is an ungracious work to put on a professor.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Education Forums - Portland - Craigslist visited Thursday, 28 July 2005

Posted by niganit at 7:02 PM | Comments (0)
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July 18, 2005

Learning Naturally

Give the pupils something to do, not something to learn; and the doing is of such a nature as to demand thinking; learning naturally results.
—John Dewey

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday, July 16/17, 2005
See also: John Dewey - Wikipedia, the Free Encylopedia

Posted by niganit at 10:50 AM | Comments (0)
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June 30, 2005

Rid of All Suffering: How Soon?

It is important not to have the unrealistic expectation that we will find a magic key to help get rid of [all suffering]. It takes determination, patience, and more than one week.
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Tuesday, May 31th 2005 entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

Posted by niganit at 5:57 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Dalai Lama | Famous People | Inspirational | Teaching

June 29, 2005

Trust: The Dots in Your Life Connect

You have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future....

You have to trust in something - your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down and it has made all the difference in my life....

You have to find what you love. The only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work....

Your time is limited. Don't waste it living someone else's life. Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition....

Stay hungry, stay foolish.
—Steve Jobs
CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, Commencement address at Stanford University, delivered on June 12, 2005.

Source: The other side of the dream by Garry Barker, Sydney Morning Herald June 23, 2005
To read his entire speech, see also: Steve Jobs at Stanford, June 12, 2005

Posted by niganit at 9:29 AM | Comments (0)
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June 16, 2005

Inspire to Teach

Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself.
—Chinese Proverb

One's mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions.
—Oliver Wendell Holmes

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.
—William Butler Yeats

Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body.
—Marcus Tullius Cicero

Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.
—Robert Frost

Draw a crazy picture, Write a nutty poem, Sing a mumble-gumble song; Whistle through your comb. Do a looney-gooney dance 'Cross the Kitchen Floor, Put something silly in the world that ain't been there before.
—Shel Silverstein

Source: Shared with me by one of my April 2005 Term students, Jennifer, on June 15, 2005.
Thank you, Jennifer.

June 14, 2005

First Commercial Digital Computer: 1951

And it was on this day in 1951 the world's first commercially produced electronic digital computer was unveiled, known as the UNIVAC. It weighed eight tons, and used 5,000 vacuum tubes. It cost a quarter million dollars, but it could perform a thousand calculations per second, the fastest rate in the world at the time. The first one was bought by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The president of IBM thought that computers were far too complex, and would never sell. But with the invention of the microchip in 1971, all the processing power of those thousands of vacuum tubes could be crammed into a tiny space.

In 1975, an engineer named Ed Roberts was one of the first people to try to market a computer to ordinary people. It didn't sell very well. You had to know how to turn hundreds of little switches. But it was an inspiration to Stephen Wozniak, who went on to found Apple, and also a young student at Harvard named Bill Gates.

Source: Writer's Almanac for June 14, 2005 by Garrision Keillor

Posted by niganit at 10:59 AM | Comments (0)
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May 13, 2005

You Want Me to What? ...

After being interviewed by the school administration, the eager teaching prospect said: Let me see if I've got this right...

...You want me to go into that room with all those kids, and fill their. every waking moment with a love for learning. And I'm supposed to instill a sense of pride in their ethnicity, modify their disruptive behavior, observe them for signs of abuse and even censor their T-shirt messages and dress habits.

You want me to wage a war on drugs and sexually transmitted diseases, check their backpacks for weapons of mass destruction, and raise their self esteem. You want me to teach them patriotism, good citizenship, sportsmanship, fair play, how to register to vote, how to balance a checkbook, and how to apply for a job.

I am to check their heads for lice, maintain a safe environment, recognize signs of anti-social behavior, make sure all students pass the mandatory state exams, even those who don't come to school regularly or complete any of their assignments.

Plus, I am to make sure that all of the students with handicaps get an
equal education regardless of the extent of their mental or physical handicap. And I am to communicate regularly with the parents by letter, telephone, newsletter and report card. All of this I am to do with just a piece of chalk, a computer, a few books, a bulletin board, a big smile AND on a starting salary that qualifies my family for food stamps!

You want me to do all of this and yet you expect me . . NOT TO
PRAY??

—Unknown, (but every teacher I know had to have contributed to this)

Source: An email I received on Thursday, May 12, 2005

Posted by niganit at 7:25 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Humorous | Profound | Teaching

May 12, 2005

The Owl and the Pussy Cat

The owl and the pussy-cat went to sea
    In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey and plenty of money,
    Wrapped up in a five pound note.
The owl look up to the stars above,
    And sang to a small guitar,
O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
  What a beautiful Pussy you are,
       You are,
       You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!
—Edward Lear from his poem The Owl and the Pussy-cat.
   To read the entire poem, see The Owl and the Pussycat online

Source: Edward Lear: The Complete Verse and Other Nonsense Edited by Vivien Noakes Penguin Books (U.S.A.) 2001 ISBN 0-14-20.0227-5

Thursday, May 12, 2005

It's the birthday of the man who wrote,
    "There was an old man who supposed That the street door was partially closed, But some very large rats ate his coats and his hats While that futile old gentleman dozed."

That was Edward Lear, born in London (1812). He was the 20th of 21 childrenalmost half of whom had died in infancy. He was raised by his sister who taught him to paint birds and flowers.

There was a market for illustrated books about birds, so Edward Lear got into that business and became a successful bird illustrator. He always painted from life. He painted the specimens that Charles Darwin brought back from his trip on the H.M.S. Beagle,/cite>.

He suffered from depression, epilepsy, and terrible eyesight. He felt like an outcast in British society.

In 1832 came a turning point in his life. The Earl of Darby invited Edward Lear to come and paint all the animals in his private zoo, and Lear did and arrived at the estate and wound up spending most of his free time with the Earl's grandchildren. Edward Lear had never spent any time with children before. He found that he loved them. He became a clown. He sang songs for them, he drew cartoons, and he made up humorous poems.

And he wrote down those poems and they became his Book of Nonsense, which came out in 1846, the poem about the owl and the pussycat who went to sea in a beautiful pea green boat and the poem about the jumblies and others.

Source: Garrison Keilor's The Writer's Almanac for May 12, 2005

Posted by niganit at 7:35 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Creative | Famous People | Humorous | Teaching

May 4, 2005

Teachers Never Teaching?

Good teachers never teach anything. What they do is create the conditions under which learning takes place.
—S.I. Hayakawa

Source: Inspirational Calendar Tuesday, May 3, 2005 entry

Teacher Appreciation Day was celebrated on Tuesday, May 3, 2005.
Visit Teachers Count

May 2, 2005

Cross the Sea

You cannot cross the sea merely by standing and staring at the water.
—R. Tagore

Source: Inspirational Calendar April 30/May 1, 2005 entry

Posted by niganit at 8:28 PM | Comments (0)
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April 28, 2005

Music is Most Universal

Among the many forces in which the human spirit has tried to express its innermost yearnings and perceptions, music is perhaps the most universal. It symbolizes humanity's search for harmony, with oneself and others, with nature, and with the spiritual and sacred within and around us.
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Thursday, April 28th 2005 entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

April 26, 2005

War is Always About Sorrow

War is always about sorrow and the deepest suffering. Nitwits try to dress it up in the finery of half-baked rationalizations, but the reality is always wanton bloodshed, rotting flesh and the lifelong trauma of those who are physically or psychically maimed.
—Bob Herbert

Source: The Agony of War Op-Ed by Bob Herbert, NY Times, April 25, 2005

Posted by niganit at 10:59 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Profound | Sadness | Teaching

April 23, 2005

Great Teachers Empathize

Great teachers emphathize with kids, and believe that each one has something special that can be built upon.
—Ann Lieberman

Source: Teachers Calendar Thursday, March 10, 2005 entry
See also Real-life View: An Interview with Ann Lieberman By Dennis Sparks Journal of Staff Development, Fall 1999 (Vol. 20, No. 4)

Posted by niganit at 7:51 PM | Comments (0)
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March 27, 2005

Closest Friends

The closest friends I have made through my life have been people who also grew up close to a loved and loving grandmother and grandfather.
—Margaret Mead

Source: Grandparents: A Book of Favorite Quotations, Words of Wisdom edited by Kristin Shea 2003 Barnes & Noble Books ISBN 0-7607-4066-6
See also: Margaret Mead's Life and Work

Posted by niganit at 1:58 PM | Comments (0)
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March 26, 2005

Unbending Principles

I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times.
—Everett Dirksen

Source: Leadership Quotes on wisdomquotes.com
See also: Senator Everett Dirksen's Biography

Posted by niganit at 8:23 PM | Comments (0)
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March 5, 2005

With My Heart

I teach with my heart and my soul and not with my mouth alone.
—Jaime Escalante

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Thursday, March 3, 2005

Posted by niganit at 2:47 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Inspirational | Teaching

March 2, 2005

Learn and Hold

Learn as though you would never be able to master it; hold it as though you would be in fear of losing it.
—Confucius

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Tuesday, March 1, 2005 entry

Posted by niganit at 9:12 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Ancient Thoughts | Famous People | Teaching

February 20, 2005

Teacher's Major Contribution

A teacher's major contribution may pop out anonymously in the life of some ex-student's grandchild.
—Wendell Berry

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Thursday, February 17, 2005 entry

Posted by niganit at 5:35 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Profound | Teaching

February 19, 2005

To Change Our World

Think of an idea to change our world
——and put it into ACTION!
—Mr. Eugene Simonet (Middle School Social Studies Teacher) played by Kevin Spacey in the movie Pay It Forward (2000)

Source: Pay It Forward DVD ISBN: 0-7907-5680-3
Mr. Simonet's Social Studies assignment to his seventh graders that inspired the character Trevor McKinney's Pay It Forward idea. Trevor was played by the young actor Haley Joel Osment.

February 16, 2005

All I Really Need to Learn

Most of what I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sandpile at Sunday school.
These are the things I learned:
  • Share everything.
  • Play fair.
  • Don't hit people.
  • Put things back where you found them.
  • Clean up your own mess.
  • Don't take things that aren't yours.
  • Say you're sorry when you hurt someone.
  • Wash your hands before you eat.
  • Flush.
  • Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.
  • When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
  • Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the styrofoam cup: The roots go dwon and the plant goes up and nobody really kows how or why, but we are all like that.
  • Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and even the little seed in the styrofoam cup—they all die. So do we.
  • And then remember that Dick-and-Jane books and the first word you learned—the biggest word of all—LOOK.

Source: All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things by Robert Fulghum 1989 Villard Books
See also All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten : Fifteenth Anniversary Edition Reconsidered, Revised, & Expanded With Twenty-Five New Essays ISBN: 0345466179

Posted by niganit at 5:53 PM | Comments (0)
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February 5, 2005

Wish for Children

My own wish for children is that they learn to find joy even amidst the world's and their own imperfections, that they grow to have a clear but forgiving interior voice to guide them, and that they come to have a reasonable sense of shame without unreasonable burdens of guilt.
—Fred Rogers

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar February 4, 2005 entry
from the book The World According to Mr. Rogers by Fred Rogers
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Posted by niganit at 9:21 PM | Comments (0)
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January 31, 2005

What a Pupil Cannot Do

The pupil who is never required to do what he cannot do, never does what he can do.
---John Stuart Mill

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, January 29/30, 2005 entry
See also: John Stuart Mill (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Posted by niganit at 5:58 PM | Comments (0)
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January 29, 2005

Who is Your Mentor and Teacher?

The mentor/teacher is the person who sees who you are, sees your beauty, falls in love with it, helps and inspires it, giving it a chance to bloom in the world.
---James Hillman

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, January 20, 2005 entry
See also: Insight & Outlook's Interview with James Hillman

Posted by niganit at 10:08 AM | Comments (0)
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January 26, 2005

Teaching's Sin

In teaching, the greatest sin is to be boring.
---Chinese Proverb

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar January 18, 2005 entry

Posted by niganit at 10:48 AM | Comments (0)
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January 18, 2005

To Be Noble

To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler
--and less trouble.
---Mark Twain - Doctor Van Dyke speech, 1906

Source: MarkTwain Quotations Teaching.
See twainquotes.com for more Mark Twain quotations.

Posted by niganit at 9:39 PM | Comments (0)
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January 5, 2005

A Poem For Computer Users Over 50

A computer was something on TV,
From a Science Fiction show of note,
A window was something you hated to clean,
And ram was the father of a goat.

Meg was the name of my girlfriend,
And gig was a job for the night,
Now they all mean different things,
And that really mega bytes.

An application was for employment,
A program was a TV show,
A cursor used profanity,
A keyboard was a piano.

Memory was something that you lost with age,
A CD was a bank account,
And if you had a 3-in. floppy,
You hoped nobody found out.

Compress was something you did to the garbage,
Not something you did to a file,
And if you unzipped anything in public,
You'd be in jail for a while.

Log on was adding wood to the fire,
Hard drive was a long trip on the road,
A mouse pad was where a mouse lived,
And a backup happened to your commode.

Cut you did with a pocket knife,
Paste you did with glue,
A web was a spider's home,
And a virus was the flu.

I guess I'll stick to my pad and paper,
And the memory in my head.
I hear nobody's been killed in a computer crash,
But when it happens they wish they were dead.
---Author Unknown- Contribution by

Source: An email forwarded by my Bride on Friday, Jan. 7, 2005. Poem attibuted From Bruce D. in Adelaide

Posted by niganit at 10:19 PM | Comments (0)
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January 2, 2005

Teaching's Purpose

We're here to help children succeed. It's that simple.
---Elaine Collins

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes 2005 Calendar for Saturday and Sunday, January 1/2, 2005 published by Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-4487-9

Posted by niganit at 11:29 AM | Comments (0)
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January 1, 2005

Truth and Error

An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody will see it.
---Mahatma Gandhi

Source: The Official Mahatma Gandhi Archives: Quotes

Posted by niganit at 11:10 AM | Comments (0)
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December 31, 2004

Voice Within You

The more faithfully you listen to the voice within you, the better you hear what is sounding outside. And only he who listens can speak..
---Dag Hammarskjold,
Secretary-General of the United Nations from 10 April 1953 until 18 September 1961

Source: Educational Quotes for the 21st Century
See also Dag Hammarskjold's bio

Also, from Dag Hammarskjold

Your position never gives you the right to command. It only imposes on you the duty of so living your life that others can receive your orders without being humiliated.
---Dag Hammarskjold

Source: Brainy Quotes by Dag Hammarskjold

Posted by niganit at 7:06 PM | Comments (0)
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December 29, 2004

99 Ways to say "Good job"

Here I am on vacation and still thinking about teaching!

Hope this (long) list is of some help. On the theory that positive comments are more valuable than negative, perhaps this list will help. It's an old list and it's been around and some of it is obvious, but it may be helpful to remind ourselves of the value of being positive with students.

1. You're on the right track now!
2. You're doing a good job!
3. You did a lot of work today.
4. Now you've figured it out.
5. That's RIGHT!
6. Now you have the hang of it.
7. That's the way!
8. You're really going to town.
9. You're doing fine.
10. Now you have it!
11. Nice going.
12. That's coming along nicely.
13. That's great
14. You did it that time!
15. GREAT!
16. FANTASTIC!
17. TERRIFIC!
18. Good for you.
19. You outdid yourself today.
20. GOOD WORK!
21. That's better.
22. Exce11ent!
23. That's a good boy/girl!
24. Good job, (Robert)!
25. That's the best you've ever done.
26. Good going!
27. Keep it up.
28. That's really nice.
29. WOW!
30. Keep up the good work!
31. Much better!
32. Good for you!
33. That's very much better.
34. Good thinking!
35. Exactly right!
36. SUPER!
37. Nice going.
38. You make it look easy.
39. I've never seen anyone do it better.
40. You are doing that much better today.
41. Way to go!
42. Not bad.
43. SUPERB!
44. You're getting better every day.
45. WONDERFUL
46. I knew you could do it.
47. Keep working on it; you're getting better
48. You're doing beautifully.
49. You're really working hard today.
50. That's the way to do it!
51. Keep on trying!
52. THAT'S it.
53. Nothing can stop you now.
54. You1ve got it made!
55. You are very good at that..
56. You are learning fast.
57. I'm very proud of you.
58. You certainly did well today.
59. You've just about got it.
60. That's good.
61. Jim -- happy to see you working like that.
62. Jim -- proud of the way you worked today.
63. That's the right way to do it.
64. You are really learning a lot.
65. That's better than ever.
66. That's quite an improvement.
67. That kind of work makes me very happy.
68. MARVELOUS!
69. You've figured it out.
70. PERFECT!
71. That's not half bad.
72. FINE!
73. You've got your brain in gear today.
74. That's IT!
75. WOW! figured that out fast,
76. You remembered!
77. You're really improving.
78. I think you've got it now.
79. Well look at you go!
80. You've got that down pat.
81. TREMENDOUS!
82. OUTSTANDING!
83. I like that.
84. Couldn't have done it better myself.
85. Now that's what I call a fine job.
86. You did that very well.
87. Congratulations!
88. That was first class work.
89. Right on!
90. SENSATIONAL!
91. That's the best ever.
92. Good remembering.
93. You haven't missed a thing.
94. It's a pleasure to teach when you work like that.
95. You really make my job fun.
96. Congratulations! You got (number) right!
97. You've just about mastered that.
98. One more time and you'll have it.
99. You must have been practicing.
----Creative Teaching December 2004 Newsletter

Source: Creative Teaching Web site periodic newsletter

Posted by niganit at 12:46 PM | Comments (0)
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December 11, 2004

Making Green

In preschool this week, they're doing color mixing---you know, the old "two drops of red and two drops of yellow, and you get orange"---all that cool stuff. Well, I was cleaning the toilet and put in that blue stuff to make it look good, and my four-year-old walked into the room and brightly said, "You know, Mom, if I pee in there, we can make green."
---Mary, Mahtomedi, Minnesota, from the book The Best of Bulletin Board by Daniel Kelly

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes 2004 Calendar for August 13, 2004 published by Andrews McMeel Publishing

Posted by niganit at 11:00 AM | Comments (0)
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December 9, 2004

The Incredible to Be Known

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.
---Blaise Pascal

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar for Tuesday, December 7, 2004
See also Blaise Pascal on Wikipedia

Posted by niganit at 8:23 AM | Comments (0)
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November 30, 2004

No Brilliant Achievement Without ....

If there is no dull and determined effort,
there will no brilliant achievement.
---Hsun-tzu

Source: Teachers daily calendar: Thursday, November 25, 2004 (Thanksgiving Day USA, 2004)
See also: The Overview Of World Religions The School of Hsun Tzu overview. This part of St. Martin's College, Lancaster UK Division of Religion and Philosphy.

Posted by niganit at 6:15 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Ancient Thoughts | Teaching

November 28, 2004

Holy Curiosity

The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality.
It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.
---Albert Einstein (attributed)

Source: Albert Einstein - Wikiquote

Posted by niganit at 8:19 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Einstein | Famous People | Inspirational | Teaching

October 29, 2004

Aim of Education

To save man from the morass of propaganda, in my opinion, is one of the chief aims of education.
Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern true from false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction.
----Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, entry for Sat/Sun February 7/8 2004

Posted by niganit at 8:47 AM | Comments (0)
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October 20, 2004

Art of Teaching

To know how to suggest is the great art of teaching.
----Anatole France Thibault

Source: Teachers daily calendar, Tuesday, October 19, 2004

Posted by niganit at 11:49 AM | Comments (0)
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October 17, 2004

The Journey; Not the Destination

Accomplishments will prove to be a journey, not a destination.
---Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969)

Source: Creative Quotations for Dwight D. Eiesenhower, born October 16

Posted by niganit at 4:09 PM | Comments (0)
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October 8, 2004

Imagine

To know is nothing at all; to imagine is everything.
----Anatole France Thibault

Source: Teachers daily calendar, Thursday, October 8, 2004

Posted by niganit at 1:31 PM | Comments (0)
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September 28, 2004

Education: A Definition

An education isn't how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It's being able to differentiate between what you know and what you don't.
---Anatole France Thibault

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar: for Tuesday, September 28, 2004

Posted by niganit at 11:10 PM | Comments (0)
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September 3, 2004

Temperature Conversions

A Neat Celsius to Fahrenheit to Celsius Converter

Temperature Converter

Enter a number representing a temperature in either the Celsius box or the Fahrenheit box and click on the Calculate button.
The converted temperature for the other scale will appear in that box. While you may use decimal input, the final result will be rounded to whole numbers. Press the Reset button to clear any values in both boxes.

°F   =   °C

Source: Temperature Conversions Online

Posted by niganit at 4:30 PM | Comments (0)
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September 2, 2004

The Parsnip

The parsnip, children, I repeat
Is simply an anemic beet.
Some people call the parsnip edible;
Myself, I find this claim incredible.
---The Parsnip by Ogden Nash

Posted by niganit at 10:30 AM | Comments (0)
More like this: Poetry | Silly | Teaching

August 23, 2004

Imagination is Boundless

The world of reality has its limits;
the world of imagination is boundless.
---Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Source: Teachers daily calendar entry for Sat/Sun, August 21/22, 2004

Posted by niganit at 8:25 AM | Comments (0)
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August 17, 2004

Holding Your Tongue

The best time to hold your tongue is the time you must say something or bust.
---Josh Billings

Source: Teachers daily calendar entry for Sat/Sun, August 14/15, 2004

Posted by niganit at 7:44 AM | Comments (0)
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July 30, 2004

Students Will Never Forget

They may forget what you said,
but they will never forget how you made them feel.
---Carl W. Buechner

Source: Teachers daily calendar entry for Thursday, July 29, 2004

Posted by niganit at 12:28 PM | Comments (0)
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July 7, 2004

Our Job in Life

As human beings, our job in life is to help people realize how rare and valuable each one of us really is,
that each of us has something that no one else has--
or ever will have--something inside that is unique to all time.
It's our job to encourage each other to discover that uniqueness and to provide ways of developing its expression.
---Fred Rogers (Mister Rogers)

Source: The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Posted by niganit at 7:37 PM | Comments (0)
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June 25, 2004

Approach Immortality

If something comes to life in others because of you, then you have made an approach to immortality.
---Norman Cousins

Source: Teachers Calendar Thursday, June 24, 2004 entry

Posted by niganit at 12:00 PM | Comments (0)
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June 11, 2004

Remembering Why a Teacher

Remember why you became a teacher. When you are working long hours while your friends enjoy forty-hour weeks, and you don't think you can endure much longer, remember why you are in that classroom. You are in that classroom because you love your subject and you love kids. You are a cultivator of minds, a shaper of nations. You are not just a teacher.
---Lee Silva, Plano, Texas, Secondary Teacher of the Year

Source: Teachers Calendar Thursday, June 10, 2004 entry: from the book Teacher of the Year: 365 Quotes of Insight, Insiration, and Motivation from America's Greatest Teachers by Frank Sennett

Posted by niganit at 12:22 PM | Comments (1)
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April 16, 2004

Valuable Result

Perhaps the most valuable result of all education is the ability to make yourself do the thing you have to do, when it ought to be done, whether you like it or not.
---Walter Bagehot

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar: Thursday, April 15 entry

Posted by niganit at 12:57 PM | Comments (0)
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March 30, 2004

Maybe (Maybe Not)

Author Robert Fulghum's list of contradictory notions he holds:

Look before you leap
He who hesitates is lost.

Two heads are better than one.
If you want something done right, do it yourself.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
Better safe than sorry.

Out of sight, out of mind.
Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

You can't tell a book by its cover.
Clothes make the man.

Many hands make light work.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.

You can't teach an old dog new tricks.
It's never too late to learn.

Never sweat the small stuff.
God is in the details.

Trust me, I'm the teacher.
Question authority.

Source: Robert Fulghum's Maybe (Maybe Not): Second Thoughts from a Secret Life, Published by 1993 by Villard Books ISBN 0-697-41960-8

Posted by niganit at 9:56 PM | Comments (0)
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March 26, 2004

Captain: Word Origin

CAPTAIN • The head of a ship or a plane drives his or her title from the human head. It began in Latin with the noun caput, "a head." This generated the Low Latin capitaneus, meaning "chief" or "leader," as in someone who represents the head of a body of people. The meaning stuck, as the word appeared in Middle French and then in Middle English as captein.

Source: The Word Origin Calendar Thursday, March, 25, 2004

Posted by niganit at 2:32 PM | Comments (0)
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March 14, 2004

People Forget

People will always forget what you do, and they will always forget what you say, but they will never, ever forget the way you make them feel.
---Amelia Stanelle, Teacher of the Year at Muscogee County Ohio's Blackmon Middle School

Source: Teacher of the Year: 365 Quotes of Insight, Inspiration, and Motivation from America's Greatest Teachers by Frank Sennett

Posted by niganit at 9:37 PM | Comments (0)
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March 1, 2004

Kindness to Each Other

Three things in human life are important:
The first is to be kind.
The second is to be kind.
The third is to be kind.

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar entry for Sat/Sun Feb. 28/29

Posted by niganit at 10:19 AM
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February 25, 2004

A Personal Achievement

Today, Feb. 25, 2004, I achieved a personal goal. I successfully passed the MS Outlook version 2002 Microsoft Office Specialist Certification Exam. I was really thrilled. That completes all the MS Office XP MOS certifications.

I am already certified as an MS Office XP Master, Now I can apply for the MS Office XP Master Instructor certification.

Good on you, Rich. Pride in one's accomplishments is a good and worthy thing!

:-)

Posted by niganit at 10:25 PM
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Visible to Others

As a teacher, I am always mindful that my students (and colleagues) are watching me. Students, particularly, are so very observant. So my Don't Sweat the Small Stuff calendar, Feb 21, hit me right between the eyes.

The love and forgiveness in your heart is more visible to others than any of us can possible imagine

Posted by niganit at 10:19 PM
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