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Famous People Category: 436 Entries


January 1, 2011

New Doors

When one door of happiness closes, another one opens: but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us....
—Helen Keller

Source: Quotablecards.com

Posted by niganit at 5:43 PM | Comments (0)
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December 31, 2010

Finished!

There will come a time when you believe everything is finished.
That will be the beginning.
—Louis L'Amour

Source: Quotablecards.com

Posted by niganit at 5:25 PM | Comments (0)
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November 15, 2010

Something to Do

Thank God every morning when you get up that you have something to do that day which must be done, whether you like it or not.
—James Russell Lowell

Source: Compendium Inc's Facebook Page on Monday, 15 November 2010.

Posted by niganit at 9:47 AM | Comments (0)
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November 10, 2010

Simplicity

Beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on simplicity.
—Plato

Source: Presentation Zen Design: Simple Design Principles and Techniques to Enhance Your Presentations [Paperback] by Garr Reynolds 2010 New Riders ISBN-13: 978-0321668790
See also: Garr's blog at http://presentationzen.com

Posted by niganit at 9:28 AM | Comments (0)
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August 1, 2010

Rains All The Time!

[A]t this place we had wintered and remained from the 7th of Decr. 1805 to this day and have lived as well as we had any right to expect, and we can say that we were never one day without 3 meals of some kind a day either pore Elk meat or roots, notwithstanding the repeated fall of rain which has fallen almost constantly since we passed the long narrows.
—Meriwether Clark, wrote before setting out on March 23, 1806 from Fort Clatsop, Oregon.

Source: National Park Service Lesson Plans on the Lewis & Clark Expedition: Reading 3: Wintering on the West Coast.

June 11, 2010

we must rise with the occasion

It is not "Can any of us imagine better?" but "Can we all do better?" Object whatsoever is possible, still the question recurs, "Can we do better?" The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.
—Abraham Lincoln

Source: Abraham Lincoln , Second Annual Message [to Congress] December 1, 1862
> John T. Woolley and Gerhard Peters, The American Presidency Project [online]. Santa Barbara, CA. Available from World Wide Web: http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=29503.

Posted by niganit at 8:44 PM | Comments (0)
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May 31, 2010

Five Lessons of Winston Churchill's Life

Winston Churchill led a full life, and few people are ever likely to equal it—its amplitude, variety, and success on so many fronts. But all can learn from it, especially in FIVE ways.
~ The first lesson is: always aim high.
~ Lesson number two is: there is no substitute for hard work.
~ Third, and in its way most important, Churchill never allowed mistakes, disaster—personal or national—accidents, illnesses, unpopularity, and criticism to get him down.
~ Fourth, Churchill wasted an extraordinarily small amount of his time and emotional energy on the meanness of life: recrimination, shifting the blame onto others, malice, revenge seeking, dirty tricks, spreading rumors, harboring grudges, waging vendettas.
~ Finally, the absence of hatred left plenty of room for joy in Churchill's life.
—Paul Brown

Source: Churchill by Paul Johnson. Viking 2009 ISBN: 978-0-670-02105-5

Posted by niganit at 2:19 PM | Comments (0)
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May 5, 2010

Magical Things

The universe is full of magical things, patiently waiting for our wits
to grow sharper.
—Eden Phillpotts

Source: Inspired Quote of the Week email subscription from Compendium, Inc.
See also: > Eden Phillpotts on Wikipedia

Posted by niganit at 4:29 PM | Comments (0)
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February 10, 2010

while I think on thee, dear friend

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear times' waste:
Then can I drown an eye, unus'd to flow,
For precious friends hid in death's dateless night,
And weep afresh love's long since cancell'd woe,
And moan the expense of many a vanish'd sight:
Then can I grieve at grievances foregone,
And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er
The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan,
Which I new pay as if not paid before.
But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
All losses are restor'd and sorrows end.

—William Shakespeare: Sonnet XXX

Source: The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2010.

Posted by niganit at 9:05 AM | Comments (0)
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January 27, 2010

When to Stop Talking?

My great-grandfather used to say to his wife, my great-grandmother, who in turn told her daughter, my grandmother, who repeated it to her daughter, my mother, who used to remind her daughter, my own sister, that to talk well and eloquently was a very great art, but that an equally great one was to know the right moment to stop.
—Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Source: ThinkExist.com's Mozart Quotes
> It is the birthday of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart born in 1756 on this day in Salzburg, Austria. He died in Vienna, Austria on December 5, 1791. See The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Posted by niganit at 9:41 AM | Comments (0)
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December 30, 2009

You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!

'E carried me away
To where a dooli lay,
An' a bullet come an' drilled the beggar clean.
'E put me safe inside,
An' just before 'e died,
"I 'ope you liked your drink", sez Gunga Din.
So I'll meet 'im later on
At the place where 'e is gone --
Where it's always double drill and no canteen;
'E'll be squattin' on the coals
Givin' drink to poor damned souls,
An' I'll get a swig in hell from Gunga Din!
Yes, Din! Din! Din!
You Lazarushian-leather Gunga Din!
Though I've belted you and flayed you,
By the livin' Gawd that made you,
You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!
—Rudyard Kipling in his poem Gunga Din

Source: Everypoet.com's Poetry of Rudyard Kipling Gunga Din.
> it is the birthday of Rudyard Kipling who was born in Bombay, India in 1865. He died on January 18, 1936 in London England.

Posted by niganit at 7:08 AM | Comments (0)
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December 23, 2009

Waiting for Sunday?

Some masters say our life lasts only seven days.
Where are we in the week? Is it Thursday yet?
Hurry, cry now! Soon Sunday night will come.
—Robert Bly from his unpublished poem Call and Answer

Source: New and Unpublished Poems by Robert Bly: Call and Answer
> It is the birthday of Robert Bly, born on this day in 1926 in Madison, Minnesota.
> See also The Chesapeake Men's Gathering.

Posted by niganit at 7:47 AM | Comments (0)
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December 16, 2009

No Lies, Please, I Love a good Soup!

Anyone who tells a lie has not a pure heart, and cannot make a good soup.
—Ludwig van Beethoven

Source: BrainyQuote.com's Ludwig van Beethoven Quotes.
>: Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany; he was baptized in a Roman Catholic service on 17 December 1770, and was probably born the previous day, 16 December. He died on 26 March 1827 in Vienna, Austria.

Posted by niganit at 8:22 AM | Comments (0)
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November 25, 2009

Happiness of Life

What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that — everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. ... I don't think two people could have been happier than we have been. V.
—Virginia Woolf

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, November 25, 2009.

Posted by niganit at 6:44 AM | Comments (0)
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November 23, 2009

How Do You Respond to a Problem?

The problem is rarely/never the problem. The response to the problem invariably ends of being the real problem.*
—Tom Peters
*Perception is all there is!

Source: Email subscription tom peters! Quotes of 23 November 2009.
See also: tompeters!.

Posted by niganit at 7:22 AM | Comments (0)
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November 2, 2009

Use Me Thoroughly Up!

I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work, the more I live. Life is no "brief candle" for me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.
—George Bernard Shaw

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Monday, November 2, 2009.

Posted by niganit at 8:50 AM | Comments (0)
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October 3, 2009

Fears of Some People

The fears of one class of men are not the measure of the rights of another.
—George Bancroft

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Saturday, October 3, 2009.
> Today is the birthday of George Bancroft born this day in 1800 in Worcester, Massachusetts. He was an historian and statesman, and was acting Secretary of the Navy when the US Naval School (later, the US Naval Academy) was established on October 10, 1845 on the Severn River in Annapolis, Maryland. He died on January 17, 1891 in Washington, D.C.
> Bancroft Hall at the US Naval Academy was built in 1901–06 and is named in honor of George Bancroft.

Posted by niganit at 6:17 PM | Comments (0)
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October 2, 2009

Be the Change

We need to be the change we wish to see in the world.
—Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

Source: WikiQuote's Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi
> WikiQuote says of this quote:
"As quoted in "Arun Gandhi Shares the Mahatma's Message" by Michel W. Potts, in India - West [San Leandro, California] Vol. XXVII, No. 13 (1 February 2002) p. A34; Arun Gandhi indirectly quoting his grandfather. See also. "Be the change you wish to see: An interview with Arun Gandhi" by Carmella B'Hahn, Reclaiming Children and Youth [Bloomington] Vol.10, No. 1 (Spring 2001) p. 6"
> Today is the birthday of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, born this day in Porbandar, a coastal town in present-day Gujarat, India, on 2 October 1869. On 30 January 1948, Gandhi was shot while having his nightly public walk on the grounds of the Birla Bhavan (Birla House) in New Delhi.
> See also Wikipedia's Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.

Posted by niganit at 7:52 PM | Comments (0)
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September 30, 2009

Clever, You Say?

I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying.
—Oscar Wilde

Source: Oscar Wilde quotes on Thinkexist.com.

Posted by niganit at 7:32 AM | Comments (0)
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August 11, 2009

My Absent Child

Grief fills the room up of my absent child,
Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me,
Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words,
Remembers me of all his gracious parts,
Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form;
Then, have I reason to be fond of grief?
Fare you well: had you such a loss as I,
I could give better comfort than you do.—
I will not keep this form upon my head,
When there is such disorder in my wit.
O Lord! my boy, my Arthur, my fair son!
My life, my joy, my food, my all the world!
My widow-comfort, and my sorrows' cure!
—William Shakepeare as spoken by Constance in The Life and Death of King John

Source: The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Tuesday, August 11, 2009
>> On this day in 1596, William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway buried their only son, Hamnet, who died at the age of 11 of unknown causes. At that time in England, about one third of children did not survive past the age of 10. Hamnet was named after Shakespeare's close friend, a baker, Hamlet Sadler. ("Hamnet" and "Hamlet" were virtually interchangeable names.) Hamnet had a twin sister Judith, named after the baker Hamlet's wife, Judith.

Posted by niganit at 7:25 AM | Comments (0)
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August 2, 2009

Mending Wall by Robert Frost

Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it
And spills the upper boulder in the sun,
And make gaps even two can pass abreast.
The work of hunters is another thing:
I have come after them and made repair
Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,
No one has seen them made or heard them made,
But at spring mending-time we find them there,
I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go.
To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
"Stay where you are until our backs are turned!"
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of outdoor game,
One on a side. It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, "Good fences make good neighbors."
Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
"Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it
Where there are cows? But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I'd ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offense.
Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That wants it down." I could say "Elves" to him,
But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather
He said it for himself. I see him there,
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me,
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go behind his father's saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, "Good fences make good neighbors."
—Robert Frost Mending Wall.

Source: Published in Robert Frost's book of poems North of Boston in 1915.
> Found on the Web at Jeff Ketzle's Mending Wall

Posted by niganit at 11:55 AM | Comments (0)
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July 22, 2009

To Be Real

Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in your joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand.
—Margary Williams Bianco in The Velveteen Rabbit

Source: Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor Wednesday, July 22, 2009.
It is the birthday of author Margery Williams Bianco, born Margery Williams in London, England in 1881. She's the author of the classic children's book The Velveteen Rabbit (1922). She died on September 4, 1944 in New York City.

Posted by niganit at 6:58 AM | Comments (0)
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July 1, 2009

Aspiring Writers' Advice

If you have any young friends who aspire to become writers, the second-greatest favor you can do them is to present them with copies of The Elements of Style. The first-greatest, of course, is to shoot them now, while they're happy.
—Dorothy Parker

Source: Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor Wednesday, July 1, 2009.
It is the birthday of grammarian William Strunk Jr., born in Cincinnati, Ohio (1869). He was a professor at Cornell University for 46 years, and during that time, he created the "little book" known as The Elements of Style (1918) in order to make it easier to grade his students' composition papers. He died on September 26, 1946 at Poughkeepsie, New York.

Posted by niganit at 7:24 AM | Comments (0)
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May 7, 2009

Grow old along with me!

Grow old along with me!
The best is yet to be,
The last of life, for which the first was made.
—Robert Browning

Source: The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Thursday, May 7, 2009.
> It is the birthday of Robert Browning born in London, England in 1812. He died on December 12, 1889 in Venice, Italy.

Posted by niganit at 6:59 AM | Comments (0)
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April 15, 2009

Blinding Ignorance

Blinding ignorance does mislead us.
O! Wretched mortals, open your eyes!
—Leonard da Vinci

Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff. Most fails. Some works.
You do more of what works. If it works big, others quickly copy it.
Then you do something else. The trick is the doing something else.
—Leonardo da Vinci

Source: BrainyQuote.com's Leonardo da Vinci Quotes
> It is the birthday of Leonardo da Vinci, born in Vinci, Italy in 1452. He died on May 2, 1519 in Cloux, France. Legend has it that King Francis was at his side when he died, cradling Leonardo's head in his arms.

Posted by niganit at 7:08 AM | Comments (0)
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February 17, 2009

Happy 114th Birthday, Banjo Paterson

I have gathered these stories afar
In the wind and the rain,
In the land where the cattle-camps are,
On the edge of the Plain.
On the overland routes of the west,
When the watches were long,
I have fashioned in earnest and jest
These fragments of song.

They are just the rude stories one hears
In sadness and mirth,
The records of wandering years --
And scant is their worth.
Though their merits indeed are but slight,
I shall not repine
If they give you one moment's delight,
Old comrades of mine.
—A. B. "Banjo" Paterson Prelude

Source: University of Queensland (Australia) online edition of Prelude from The Man from Snowy River and Other Verses first published in 1895.
See:
> It is the birthday of the poet, journalist, and songwriter Banjo Paterson born Andrew Paterson in Narrambla, Australia in 1864. He passed away on 5 February 1941 in Sydney, Australia. See Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2009
> The biography of Andrew Barton (Banjo) Paterson by the Australian Dictionary of Biography, Online Edition
> A wonderful article about Banjo online in the National Geograohic Magazine by Roff Smith Australia's Bard.
> He is one of my most favorite poets and I have a number of entries devoted to him here on my blog, "Consider this."
  • Clancy of the Overflow
  • Banjo's 'The Man from Ironbark'
  • Happy Birthday, Banjo Paterson (2008)
  • The Old Australian Ways
  • Flowing Beards are All the Go
  • When My Hair is Grey?
  • Mulga Bill's Bicycle
  • Happy Birthday, Mom

February 12, 2009

Presidential Leadership

Roosevelt's point was plain: Government counts, and in the right hands, it can be made to work. Strong federal action, not just private voluntary efforts and the invisible hand of the marketplace, was required to help those stricken in an emergency. The American people expected and deserved leadership in addressing their hardships, not just from state and local authorities, but from the White House. This fundamental insight would guide politicians and help millions of people in the years ahead, but it was lost on others, who ignored the lessons of Franklin Roosevelt at their peril.
—Jonathan Alter

Source: The Defining Moment: FDR's Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope by Jonathan Alter page 299 Simon & Schuster Paperbacks 2006 ISBN-13: 978-0-7432-4600-2.
See also:
> The White House.
>: The White House.gov > Biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt Thirty-Second President of the United States.

Posted by niganit at 12:53 PM | Comments (0)
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January 27, 2009

Lewis Carroll's Birthday

`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
  Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
  And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
  The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
  The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
  Long time the manxome foe he sought --
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
  And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
  The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
  And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
  The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
  He went galumphing back.

"And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?
  Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'
  He chortled in his joy.

`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
  Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
  And the mome raths outgrabe.
—Lewis Carroll JABBERWOCKY (from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1872)

Source: David Shaw's Jabberwocky.com, and specifically his quoting of Carroll's poem The Jabberwocky.
See also: on Wikipedia, Jabberwocky
> It is Lewis Carroll's birthday. He was born Charles Lutwidge Dodgson in Cheshire, England in 1832, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871). He died at Guildford, England on 14th January 1898.
> This is a repeat, of sorts, of an entry previously published in Consider This as Twas Brillig
> This entry is dedicated to my friend, Kit, who loves this poem, jumps with glee when I have recited in from my heart at our men's gatherings, and who was stricken down by a seizure of unknown cause on January 20, 2009. We send him tons of prayers and positive energies so that he may fully recover.

mark lewis doing his rendition of the CS Lewis poem on YouTube.com.

Posted by niganit at 7:01 AM | Comments (0)
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January 20, 2009

Change Has Come to the USA

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted - for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things - some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.

For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life.

For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sahn.

Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.

This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions - that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.
—Barack H. Obama, President of the United States, extract from his First Inaugural Address

Source: President Obama's Inaugural Address at WhiteHouse.gov and a copy of his Inaugural Address published in the Washington Post, January 20, 2009.
See also:
> President Obama's first proclamation, A National Day of Renewal and Reconciliation, January 20, 2009, Washington, DC, USA
> Elizabeth Alexander's Inaugural Poem Praise song for the day.

January 8, 2009

Love is a Thing

Love is a thing
you never can share

If you bring a friend
into your love affair
That's the end of your sweetheart,
that's the end of your friend
That's when your heartaches begin
—Elvis Presley's early song, That's when your heartaches begin

Source: Lyrics Mania dot com's That's When Your Heartaches Begin Lyrics
> It's the birthday of Elvis Presley, born in Tupelo, Mississippi in 1935.Elvis died at his Memphis home, Graceland, on August 16, 1977.

Posted by niganit at 7:54 AM | Comments (0)
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January 1, 2009

Happy New Year Message

Some well-known words from Abraham Lincoln, delivered to Congress in December 1862, have been cited often in the past few months. They are worth citing once more on this day: "The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country."

Lincoln added in that speech: "Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history." That's as true now as it was in the much darker year of 1862. The imperative to act wisely and well is just as urgent.

Oh, and while we're at it, happy New Year.
—Washington Post editorial. January 1, 2009

Source: Washington Post online The New Year: There is good reason for trepidation, but also for hope. published January 1, 2009. Accessed January 1, 2009.

Posted by niganit at 11:59 AM | Comments (0)
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November 19, 2008

Dedicated to President-Elect Barack Obama

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that "all men are created equal"

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow, this ground -- The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us, the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that, from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here, gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve these dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people by the people for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
—Abraham Lincoln November 19, 1863

Source: U.S Library of Congress's Transcript of the "Nicolay Draft" of the Gettysburg Address
See also:
> University of Oklahoma Law Center's U.S. Historical Documents Collection
> Read Lincoln's Gettysburg Address on this blog, Consider This.
> My Nov. 19, 2005 entry on this blog Path of American Destiny.
> My Nov. 19, 2006 entry on this blog
Gettysburg Address Anniversary
> The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Posted by niganit at 8:27 AM | Comments (0)
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November 14, 2008

Difference Between the Democrats and the Republicans

The Democrats are the party that says government will make you smarter, taller, richer, and remove the crabgrass on your lawn. The Republicans are the party that says government doesn't work and then they get elected and prove it.
—P.J. O'Rourke

Source: "The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Friday, November 14, 2008
> It is the birthday of the political satirist r P.J O'Rourke born in Toledo, Ohio in 1947.

Posted by niganit at 6:45 AM | Comments (0)
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November 5, 2008

The Year of Jubilee is Come

Blow ye the trumpet, blow!
The gladly solemn sound
Let all the nations know,
To earth's remotest bound:

The year of jubilee is come!
The year of jubilee is come!
Return, ye ransomed sinners, home.
—Charles Wesley's hymn Blow ye the trumpet, blow

Source: In Our Lifetime by Henry Louis gates, Jr. published Nov. 4, 2008 on TheRoot.com wherein Mr. Gates considers the meaning of the Presidential election of Barack Obama on Nov. 4, 2008.

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October 16, 2008

God Created Man

I think that God in creating Man somewhat overestimated his ability.
—Oscar Wilde

Source: "The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Thursday, October 16, 2008
> It is the birthday of the Irish writer Oscar Wilde born in Dublin in 1854. He died in Paris, France on November 30, 1900.

Posted by niganit at 6:51 AM | Comments (0)
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October 13, 2008

The Monkeys Stand for Honesty

Somethin' tells me
It's all happening at the zoo.
I do believe it,
I do believe it's true.

The monkeys stand for honesty,
Giraffes are insincere,
And the elephants are kindly but
They're dumb.
Orangutans are skeptical
Of changes in their cages,
And the zookeeper is very fond of rum.
Zebras are reactionaries,
Antelopes are missionaries,
Pigeons plot in secrecy,
And hamsters turn on frequently.
What a gas! You gotta come and see
At the zoo.
—Paul Simon from the lyrics of At the Zoo

Source: PaulSimon.com's lyrics online of At the Zoo
> It is the birthday of Paul Simon born in Newark, New Jersey in 1941.
> See also "The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor for Monday, October 13, 2008

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September 5, 2008

Too Many Daves

Source: The Sneetches: And Other Stories by Dr. Seuss 1989 Random House ISBN: 0-394-80089-3 (trade)
> Read Too Many Daves online.

September 4, 2008

Hunger for Life That Gnaws in Us All

I would hurl words into this darkness and wait for an echo, and if an echo sounded, no matter how faintly, I would send other words to tell, to march, to fight, to create a sense of hunger for life that gnaws in us all.
—Richard Wright

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, September 4, 2008.
> It is the birthday of American novelist Richard Wright born on a farm near Roxie, Mississippi in 1908. He died November 28, 1960 (aged 52) in Paris, France.

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August 9, 2008

The Cremation of Sam McGee

Source: A poem by Robert W. Service.

Posted by niganit at 3:13 PM | Comments (0)
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July 25, 2008

Banjo's 'The Man From Ironbark'

This is me, Rich Wersinger, reciting The Man From Ironbark (4m21s) by A. B. Banjo Paterson, the beloved Australian poet and author.
See:
> The biography of Andrew Barton (Banjo) Paterson by the Australian Dictionary of Biography, Online Edition
> Online edition of The Man From Ironbark

July 22, 2008

Mr. Rogers and Success

The thing I remember best about successful people I've met through the years is their obvious delight in what they're doing...and it seems to have very little to do with worldly success. They just love what their doing and they love it in front of others.
—Fred Rogers

Source: Tuesday, July 22, 2008 Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes 2008 Calendar by Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 978-0-7407-6680-0
See also:
> The World According to Mr. Rogers by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
> Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

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July 15, 2008

Is Your Aim Too High?

The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it.
—Michaelangelo

Source: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes 2008 Calendar by Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 978-0-7407-6680-0

July 10, 2008

How Sweet It is To Love Someone...

How right it is to care...

John Denver sings "Poems, Prayers and Promises."
How we miss you so, John.

Lyrics: Poems, Prayers and Promises

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July 5, 2008

Isabelle Anna's First Birthday

July 5th, 2008 was Isabelle Anna's first birthday.

Here's a slide show of her birthday photos.

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June 23, 2008

Why Do You Do Good?

If people are good only because they fear punishment and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.
—Albert Einstein

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8

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June 13, 2008

You Tread on My Dreams

He wishes for the Cloths of Heaven

Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
—William Butler Yeats

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, June 13, 2008.
> It's the birthday of Irish poet William Butler Yeats, born 1865 in Sandymount, Ireland, a suburb of Dublin. Yeats died in 1939 at the Hôtel Idéal Séjour, in Menton, France.

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June 9, 2008

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth

A Spitfire like the one flown by John Magee

He was flying Spitfire VZ-H, serial number AD-291 on Dec. 11, 1941.

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I’ve climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
of sun-split clouds,—and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of—wheeled and soared and swung
High in the sunlit silence. Hov’ring there,
I’ve chased the shouting wind along, and flung
My eager craft through footless halls of air….

Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
I’ve topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
Where never lark nor ever eagle flew—
And, while with silent lifting mind I’ve trod
The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.
— JOHN G. MAGEE, JR., “High Flight,” September 3, 1941.

Source: Bartleby.com's Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations 603.John Gillespie Magee, Jr. (1922–41)
See also:
> It is the birthday of John Gillespie Magee, Jr. He was born in 1922 in Shanghai, China, of missionary parents—an American father and an English mother—and spoke Chinese before English. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in late 1940. In Britain he flew in a Spitfire squadron and was killed on a routine training mission on December 11, 1941. He wrote the above sonnet and sent it to his parents on a back of a letter.

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May 31, 2008

Joy, Shipmate, Joy

JOY, shipmate, joy!
(Pleas'd to my soul at death I cry,)
Our life is closed, our life begins,
The long, long anchorage we leave,
The ship is clear at last, she leaps!
She swiftly courses from the shore,
Joy, shipmate, joy.
—Walt Whitman

Source: The Walt Whitman Archive, Leaves of Grass (1881–1882) JOY, Shipmate, Joy
See also:
> Walt Whitman was born on this day in 1819 in West Hills, Long Island, New York. He died on March 26, 1892 in Camden, New Jersey.
> Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Saturday, May 31, 2008.

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May 13, 2008

We Sail the Ocean Blue

We sail the ocean blue,
And our saucy ship's a beauty;
We're sober men and true,
And attentive to our duty.
When the balls whistle free
O'er the bright blue sea,
We stand to our guns all day;
When at anchor we ride
On the Portsmouth tide,
We have plenty of time to play.

Ahoy! Ahoy! The balls whistle free.
Ahoy! Ahoy! O'er the bright blue sea,
We stand to our guns, to our guns all day.

We sail the ocean blue,
And our saucy ship's a beauty;
We're sober men and true,
And attentive to our duty;
Our saucy ship's a beauty,
We're attentive to our duty;
We're sober men and true,
We sail the ocean blue!
—Arther Seymour Sullivan (Of Gilbert & Sullivan) from their opera H.M.S. Pinafore

Source: Lyricsandsongs.com's We Sail the Ocean Blue Lyrics
See also:
> It's the birthday of one half of the Gilbert and Sullivan opera writing team, Arthur Seymour Sullivan, born in London in 1842. He died in England on November 22, 1900.
> See: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, May 13, 2008

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May 2, 2008

Stupid is as Stupid Does

It is so pleasant to come across people more stupid than ourselves. We love them at once for being so.
— Jerome K. Jerome

Source: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Friday, May 2, 2008

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April 28, 2008

Do You Keep the Channel Open?

There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all of time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and it will be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is nor how valuable nor how it compares with other expressions. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open.
—Martha Graham

Source: Garr Reynold's blog: Presentation Zen, April 12, 2008 entry Ichi-nichi issho: Each day is a lifetime
See also:
> The incredibly inspiring The Last Lecture | Randy Pausch and the lecture itself :
(about 76 minutes you can't miss!)

Update: July 25, 2008
Randy Pausch, 47, Dies; His ‘Last Lecture’ Inspired Many to Live With Wonder
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Published: July 26, 2008 (NY Times Online)
Dr. Pausch was the Carnegie Mellon University professor whose “last lecture” made him a Lou-Gehrig-like symbol of the beauty and briefness of life.

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April 23, 2008

Happy Birthday William Shakespeare

The quality of mercy is not strain'd;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
'Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown;
His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptred sway,
It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,
It is an attribute to God himself;
And earthly power doth then show likest God's
When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,
Though justice be thy plea, consider this,
That in the course of justice none of us
Should see salvation; we do pray for mercy,
And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much
To mitigate the justice of thy plea,
Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice
Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there.
—Portia in Shakespeare's The Merchant Of Venice Act 4, scene 1, 180–187

Source: Shakespeare Quotes at enotes.com The quality of mercy is not strained.
> Also: The Merchant Of Venice Act 4, scene 1, 180–187
> It is the believed to be birthday of William Shakespeare, born in Stratford-on-Avon, England in 1564. He died on April 23, 1616.
> See: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, April 23, 2008

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April 8, 2008

A Friendship Blessing

May you be blessed with good friends.
May you learn to be a good friend to yourself.
May you be able to journey to that place in your soul
   where there is great love, warmth, feeling, and forgiveness.
May this change you.
May it transfigure that which is negative, distant, or cold in you.
May you be brought in to the real passion, kinship, and affinity of belonging.
May you treasure your friends.
May you be good to them and may you be there for them;
   may they bring you all the blessings, challenges, truth,
   and light that you need for your journey.
May you never be isolated.
May you always be in the gentle nest of belonging with your anam cara.
—John O'Donohue

Source: Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom by John O'Donohue Harper Perennial 1998 & 2004 ISBN-13: 978-0-06-092943-5

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March 31, 2008

Light Within You

The more light you allow within you, the brighter the world you live in will be.
—Shakti Gawain

Source: Spirit window card series, by Compendium, Inc.
See also: Shakti Gawain's Web site

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March 28, 2008

Never Eat at a Restaurant Called Mom's

Never eat at a place called Mom's, never play cards with a guy named Doc, and never go to bed with anyone who has more troubles than you.
—Nelson Algren

Source: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Friday, Mar. 28, 2008
See also:
> It is the birthday of Nelson Algren born in Detroit, Michigan in 1909. He died In Long Island, New York on May 9, 1981

Posted by niganit at 9:18 AM | Comments (0)
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March 20, 2008

Love: Not Perfect Caring

Love isn't a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like struggle. To love someone is to strive to accept that person exactly the way he or she is, right here and now.
—Fred Rogers

Source: The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
Today is the birthday of Fred Rogers, producer, writer, puppeteer, composer, lyricist, ordained minister and devoted student of child development. Mister Rogers was born in Latrobe, Pennsylvania in 1928. He died on February 27, 2003 at his home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
See also:
> Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Thursday, Mar. 20, 2008
> Mister Rogers' Neighborhood
> About Fred Rogers

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March 3, 2008

Who, if not I?

I am the wind on the sea.
I am the ocean wave.
I am the sound of the billows.
I am the seven-horned stag.
I am the hawk on the cliff.
I am the dewdrop in sunlight.
I am the fairest of flowers.
I am the raging boar.
I am the salmon in the deep pool.
I am the lake on the plain.
I am the meaning of the poem.
I am the point of the spear.
I am the god that makes fire in the head.
Who levels the mountain?
Who speaks the age of the moon?
Who has been where the sun sleeps?
Who, if not I?
—The Song of Amergin

Source: Speaking of Faith Public Radio show of Feb. 28, 2008 (and repeated on Sunday, Mar. 2, 2008) The Inner Landscape of Beauty | Program Particulars, a program interviewing the late Celtic poet John O'Donohue.
See also:
> Amergin, Amirgin, Amairgen by Dedanaan: Myth Is What We Call Other People's Religion.
> Short biographical sketch of John O'Donohue.

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February 28, 2008

Do What You Can

Do what
You can
,
Where
You are,
With what
You have!
—Theodore Roosevelt

Source: quotablecards: A card I gave myself on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008 in Portland, Oregon.

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February 17, 2008

Happy Birthday, Banjo Paterson

I had written him a letter which I had, for want of better
Knowledge, sent to where I met him down the Lachlan, years ago,
He was shearing when I knew him, so I sent the letter to him,
Just on spec, addressed as follows, "Clancy, of The Overflow"

And an answer came directed in a writing unexpected,
(And I think the same was written with a thumb-nail dipped in tar)
Twas his shearing mate who wrote it, and verbatim I will quote it:
"Clancy's gone to Queensland droving, and we don't know where he are."

* * * * * * * * *

In my wild erratic fancy visions come to me of Clancy
Gone a-droving "down the Cooper" where the Western drovers go;
As the stock are slowly stringing, Clancy rides behind them singing,
For the drover's life has pleasures that the townsfolk never know.

And the bush hath friends to meet him, and their kindly voices greet him
In the murmur of the breezes and the river on its bars,
And he sees the vision splendid of the sunlit plains extended,
And at night the wond'rous glory of the everlasting stars.

* * * * * * * * *

I am sitting in my dingy little office, where a stingy
Ray of sunlight struggles feebly down between the houses tall,
And the foetid air and gritty of the dusty, dirty city
Through the open window floating, spreads its foulness over all

And in place of lowing cattle, I can hear the fiendish rattle
Of the tramways and the buses making hurry down the street,
And the language uninviting of the gutter children fighting,
Comes fitfully and faintly through the ceaseless tramp of feet.

And the hurrying people daunt me, and their pallid faces haunt me
As they shoulder one another in their rush and nervous haste,
With their eager eyes and greedy, and their stunted forms and weedy,
For townsfolk have no time to grow, they have no time to waste.

And I somehow rather fancy that I'd like to change with Clancy,
Like to take a turn at droving where the seasons come and go,
While he faced the round eternal of the cash-book and the journal
--But I doubt he'd suit the office, Clancy, of The Overflow.
—A. B. (Andrew Barton) "Banjo" Paterson

Source: A.B. Paterson: Selected Poems published 1992 by Angus & Robertson Book ISBN 0-207-1726-4
> Today, Sunday, February, 17, 2008, I recited this poem to my Mom, Minna, whilst on a visit with her (and my sister, Sue and Dave) in Houston, Texas. She was filled with emotion and was well pleased. I also recited Paterson's The Man From Ironbark and Mulga Bill's Bicycle
> Today, February 17th, is "Banjo" Paterson's birthday. He was born Andrew Barton Paterson in Narrambla, New South Wales, Australia in 1864. He died in Sydney, New South Wales Australia on February 5, 1941.
See also:
> Garrison Keillor's The Wrtier's Almanac for Sunday, February 17, 2008
> University of Queensland, Australia "Banjo" Paterson's Cancy of the Overflow First published in the The Bulletin in 1889.

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February 14, 2008

Finish Each Day

Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and serenely and with too high a spirit to be cumbered with your old nonsense.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, February 7, 2008 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 9780-7407-6680-0

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February 6, 2008

The Future - Tomorrow

The future will be better tomorrow.
—Dan Quayle

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Wednesday, February 6, 2008 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 9780-7407-6680-0

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February 3, 2008

The Day the Music Died

If you knew Peg – gy Sue
Then you'd know why I feel blue with – ou – out Peg – gy,
my Pe – eg – gy Su – u – ue
Oh well I love you girl, yes I love Peggy Sue.
—Charles (Buddy Holly) Hardin Holley

Source: Wilkipedia's article Peggy Sue
> Buddy Holly (and other performers Ritchie Valens, J. P. Richardson, and the 21-year-old pilot, Roger Peterson) was killed in an airplane crash on February 3, 1959.
> Don McLean referred to that day as "the Day the Music Died."
> Holly was born Charles Hardin Holley in Lubbock, Texas on September 7, 1936.
> See Wilkipedia's article Buddy Holly

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February 2, 2008

To Be Not Afraid

I will not serve that in which I no longer believe whether it call itself my home, my fatherland or my church: and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can and as wholly as I can, using for my defence the only arms I allow myself to use - silence, exile, and cunning. ... I do not fear to be alone or to be spurned for another or to leave whatever I have to leave. And I am not afraid to make a mistake, even a great mistake, a lifelong mistake and perhaps as long as eternity too.
—james Joyce

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Wrtier's Almanac for Saturday, February 2, 2008
> Today is the birthday of James Joyce, born in Rathgar, a suburb of Dublin (1882). Joyce died on January 13, 1941 in Zürich.

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January 29, 2008

Are You a Leader?

If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.
—John Quincy Adams

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Monday, January 28, 2008 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN-13: 9780-7407-6680-0

Posted by niganit at 7:47 AM | Comments (0)
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January 18, 2008

Who is What and What is Who

On Wednesday, when the sky is blue,
And I have nothing else to do,
I sometimes wonder if it's true
That who is what and what is who.
—Pooh (from Winnie-the-Pooh)

Source: books and writers bio of A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956
It is the birthday of A.A. Milne born London, England on this day in 1882. He died in Hartfield, Sussex, on January 31, 1956.
See also:
> Garrison Keillor's The Wrtier's Almanac for Friday, January 18, 2008

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January 16, 2008

Happy Birthday, Robert W. Service, 2008 Anniversary

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.
—Robert W. Service

Source: Extract from The Cremation of Sam McGee by Robert W. Service in his collection poems The Spell of the Yukon and Other Verses published 1907
Today is the birthday of Robert W. Service, born in Preston, England in 1874 and died in Lancieux, C�tes-d'Armor, in Brittany, France on September 11, 1958.
It has been a tradition and an honor of mine to recite this poem (from the heart) at the campfire during our Annual Men's Gatherings, for the last 15 years at Buffalo Gap Camp, Capon Bridge, West Virgina.

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January 15, 2008

Hate Corrodes - Hate Destroys

Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the personality and eats away its vital unity. Hate destroys a man's sense of values and his objectivity. It causes him to describe the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, and to confuse the true with the false and the false with the true.
—Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: The Quotations Page – Martin Luther King Jr. Quotes
Today, Jan. 15th is the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, USA in 1929. He died in Memphis, Tennessee having been assassinated on April 4 , 1968.
See also:
> Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2008.
> New York Times Obituary Martin Luther King Jr.: Leader of Millions in Nonviolent Drive for Racial Justice by Murray Schumach published April 5, 1968

Posted by niganit at 9:16 AM | Comments (0)
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January 7, 2008

Falling from High Places

A fall from the third floor hurts as much as a fall from the hundredth. If I have to fall, may it be from a high place.
—Paulo Coelho

Source: Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail Again. Fail Better. Herter Studio. Running Press. 2006 ISBN 13: 978-0-7624-2514-3
See also:
> Official site of Paulo Coelho

Posted by niganit at 8:09 AM | Comments (0)
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January 4, 2008

Giving Credit

If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.
—Sir Isaac Newton

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, January 4, 2008
It is the birthday of Sir Isaac Newton who was born in Woolsthorpe, England in 1643. He died on 31 March 1727 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
See also:
> The BBC's Historic figures: Isaac Newton

Posted by niganit at 9:37 AM | Comments (0)
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January 2, 2008

Loving Ourselves

When we love ourselves, we refuse to allow others to manage our emtions from afar. Forgiveness is our means to that end.

Source: Everyday Wisdom by Dr. Wayne W. Dyer published by Hay House 1993 ISBN 1-56170-076-2
See also:
> Dr. Dyer's Official Web site

Posted by niganit at 6:56 AM | Comments (0)
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December 28, 2007

Purpose: What?

Your purpose is always about giving, loving and serving in some capacity.
—Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

Source: Everyday Wisdom by Dr. Wayne W. Dyer published by Hay House 1993 ISBN 1-56170-076-2
See also:
> Dr. Dyer's Official Web site

Posted by niganit at 7:28 AM | Comments (0)
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December 26, 2007

Let's Dance

It may be that we are doomed, that there is no hope for us, any of us, but if that is so then let us set up a last agonizing, bloodcurdling howl, a screech of defiance, a war whoop! Away with lamentation! Away with elegies and dirges! Away with biographies and histories, and libraries and museums! Let the dead eat the dead. Let us living ones dance about the rim of the crater, a last expiring dance. But a dance!
—Henry Miller in Tropic of Cancer

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, December 26, 2007
It is the birthday of Henry Miller who was born in New York City in 1891. He died June 7, 1980 in Pacific Palisades.
See also:
> Valentine Miller's Henry Miller: A Personal Collection
> Wikipedia's Henry Miller

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December 24, 2007

Scrooge on the Eve of Christmas

Marley was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it: and Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to.' Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.
—Charles Dickens, the beginning of A Christmas Carol

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Monday, December 24, 2007
See also:
> Biographical sketch of Charles Dickens
> Wikipedia's A Christmas Carol

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December 18, 2007

Thousands of Small, Routine Tasks

And tragically, since the onset of the scientific and technological revolution, it has seemingly become all too easy for ultrarational minds to create an elaborate edifice of clockwork efficiency capable of nightmarish cruelty on an industrial scale. The atrocities of Hitler and Stalin, and the mechanical sins of all who helped them, might have been inconceivable except for the separation of facts from values and knowledge from morality. In her study of Adolf Eichmann, who organized the death camp bureaucracy, Hannah Arendt coined the memorable phrase "the banality of evil" to describe the bizarre contrast between the humdrum and ordinary quality of the acts themselves—the thousands of small, routine tasks committed by workaday bureaucrats—and the horrific and satanic quality of their proximate consequences. It was precisely the machinelike efficiency of the system that carried out the genocide which seemed to make it possible for its functionaries to separate the thinking required in their daily work from the moral sensibility for which, because they were human beings, they must have had some capacity. This mysterious, vacant space in their souls, between thinking and feeling, is the suspected site of the inner crime. This barren of the spirit, rendered fallow by the blood of unkept brothers, is the precinct of the disembodied intellect, which knows the way things work but not the way they are.

It is my view that the underlying moral schism that contributed to these extreme manifestations of evil has also conditioned our civilization to insulate its conscience from any responsibility for the collective endeavors that invisibly link millions of small, silent, banal acts and omissions together in a pattern of terrible cause and effect. Today, we enthusiastically participate in what is in essence a massive and unprecedented experiment with the natural systems of the global environment, with little regard for the moral consequences. But for the separation of science and religion, we might not be pumping so much gaseous chemical waste into the atmosphere and threatening the destruction of the earth's climate balance. But for the separation of useful technological know-how and the moral judgments to guide its use, we might not be slashing and burning one football field's worth of rain forest every second. But for the assumed separation of humankind from nature, we might not be destroying half the living species on earth in the space of a single lifetime. But for the separation of thinking and feeling, we might not tolerate the deaths everyday of 37,000 children under the age of five from starvation and preventable diseases made worse by failures of crops and politics.
—Al Gore, Earth in the Balance, 1992

Source: Quotations Collected by David Conner, Part 2

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December 12, 2007

More Nothing Than Something

An atom (and thus all matter) is mostly empty space.
—Encyclopedia Britannica

Contrary to our perception and belief, there is more nothing than something, even in things that appear to have more something than nothing.
—Peter McWilliams

Everything is always in motion, even things that don't appear to have moved in millions of years.
—Peter McWilliams

The perception that things are solid and stationary is an illusion.
—Peter McWilliams

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2

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December 2, 2007

In The Yukon Wild

You know what it's like in the Yukon wild
When it's sixty-nine below;
When the ice-worms wriggle their purple heads
Through the crust of the pale blue snow;
When the pine-trees crack like little guns In the silence of the wood,
And the icicles hang down like tusks Under the parka hood;
When the stove-pipe smoke breaks sudden off,
And the sky is weirdly lit,
And the careless feel of a bit of steel Burns like a red-hot spit;
When the mercury is a frozen ball,
And the frost-fiend stalks to kill --
Well, it was just like that that day when I Set out to look for Bill.
—Robert W. Service in The Ballad of Blasphemous Bill

Source: Online copy of The Ballad of Blasphemous Bill by Robert W. Service

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November 19, 2007

THE Something I Can Do

I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something I will not refuse to do the something I can do.
—Helen Keller

Source: Because of You series window card by Compendium, Inc.

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November 9, 2007

Service

What do we live for, if not to make life less difficult for each other?
—George Eliot

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8

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November 2, 2007

Who said, "Lost!"?

I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks.
—Daniel Boone

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, November 1, 2007
⇒ Today is the birthday of Daniel Boone, born near Reading, Pennsylvania in 1734. He died in 1819.

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October 31, 2007

Making Mistakes and Feeling Good About Them

While one person hesitates because he feels inferior; the other is busy making mistakes and becoming superior.
—Henry C. Link

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2

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October 29, 2007

Human Doing?

You are not a human doing but rather a human being.
—Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

Source: Everyday Wisdom by Dr. Wayne W. Dyer published by Hay House 1993 ISBN 1-56170-076-2
See also Dr. Dyer's Official Web site

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October 7, 2007

Point of Philosophy

The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it.
—Bertrand Russell

Sourrce: 50 philosophy ideas you really need to know by Ben Dupré. Quercus 2007 ISBN-13: 978-1-84724-149-8

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September 26, 2007

Our Own Behavior

We create our fate every day . . . most of the ills we suffer from are directly traceable to our own behavior.
—Henry Miller

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8

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September 18, 2007

Change My Mind?

Faced with the choice between changing one's mind and proving there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof.
—John Kenneth Galbraith

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2

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September 12, 2007

Wasting Our Brains

That image of a $6 million high-tech U.S. helicopter with a highly trained pilot blowing an insurgent off his bicycle captures the absurdity of our situation in Iraq. The great Lebanese historian Kamal Salibi said it best: “Great powers should never get involved in the politics of small tribes.”

That is where we are in Iraq. We’re wasting our brains. We’re wasting our people. We’re wasting our future.
—Thomas L. Friedman

Source: Iraq Through China’s Lens by Thomas L. Friedman. Published Sep. 12, 2007 in the New York Times. [Requires subscription]

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August 24, 2007

Gather Rosebuds While You May

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying,
And this same flower that smiles to-day
To-morrow will be dying.
—Robert Herrick

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, August 24, 2007
⇒ Today is the birthday of Robert Herrick, born in London in 1591. He was buried at Devon on October 15, 1674.

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August 20, 2007

Victor Hugo's Exclamation Point

Victor Hugo, when he wanted to know how Les Miserables was selling, reportedly telegraphed his publisher with the single inquiry "?" and received the expressive "!".
—Lynne Truss in her book Eats, Shoots & Leaves

Source: Eats, Shoots & Leaves daily calendar, Thursday, August 16, 2007 entry.
See also:
Lynne Truss's Home page and;
⇒ Her Eats, Shoots & Leaves page.

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August 19, 2007

Okay to Make Mistakes?

A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.
—George Bernard Shaw

Source: Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail Again. Fail Better. Herter Studio. Running Press. 2006 ISBN 13: 978-0-7624-2514-3
⇒ See also: George Bernard Shaw

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July 26, 2007

Wrestle a Pig?

I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.
—George Bernard Shaw

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, July 26, 2007
⇒ Today is the birthday of George Bernard Shaw, born in Dublin, Ireland in 1856. he died at Ayot St. Lawrence, Hertfordshire, on November 2, 1950.

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July 24, 2007

Serve and Thou Shall Be Served

It is one of the most beautiful compensations of life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself ... Serve and thou shall be served.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: The Power of Intention: Learning to Co–create Your World Your Way by Dr. Wayne W. Dyer. Hay House 2004 ISBN 13: 978-1-4019-0216-2 (tradepaper)

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July 20, 2007

Three "Rs" Enough?

The three Rs — reading, 'riting, and 'rithmetic — are no longer enough. We must add the three C's — computing, critical thinking, and capacity for change.
—Fred Gluck, former manager director, McKinsey & Co.

Source: Number 164: The Pursuit of WOW!: Every Person's Guide to Topsy-Turvy Times by Tom Peters Vintage 1994. ISBN: 0-679-75555-1

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July 12, 2007

Children Never Listen

children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they never fail to imitate them.
—James Baldwin

Source: A Hand to Guide Me: Legends and Leaders Celebrate the People Who Shaped Their Lives by Denzel Washington, Meredith Books 2006 ISBN 13: 978-0-696-23049-3

June 27, 2007

My Chief Duty

I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.
—Helen Keller

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June 25, 2007

Getting Up in the Morning

I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning the day difficult.
—E. B. White, writer (1899–1985)

Source: Java House counter on June 25, 2007.
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See also:
⇒ Wikipedia's E.B. White

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June 20, 2007

To Attempt Tetrameter

Why, asks a friend, attempt tetrameter?
Because it once was noble, yet
Capers before the proud pentameter,
Tyrant of English. I regret
To see this marvelous swift meter
Deamean its heritage, and peter
Into mere Hudibrastic tricks,
Unapostolic knacks and knicks.
But why take all this quite so badly?
I would not, had I world and time
To wait for reason, rhythm, rhyme,
To reassert themselves, but sadly,
The time is not remote when I
Will not be here to wait. That's why.
—Vikram Seth in his The Golden Gate: A Novel in Verse

Source: Rice University's Minstrels Why, Asks a Friend, Attempt Tetrameter?
⇒ British Council: Arts, ComtemporaryWriters Vikram Seth Biography
⇒ Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, June 20, 2007

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June 18, 2007

Give & Take in Life

The idea that life is take, take, take (learn, learn, learn) needs to be balanced with the idea that life is also giving (teaching). Receiving and giving (learning and teaching) are two parts of a single flow, like breathing in (receiving) and breathing out (giving). One cannot take place without the other.
—Peter McWilliams

Life is something like a trumpet.
If you don't put anything in,
you won't get anything out.
—W. C. Handy

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2
See also:
⇒ University of North Alabama Library's W. C. Handy Biography
Memorial for Peter McWilliams, 1950—2000

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June 11, 2007

The Nature of Courage

Courage is doing what you're afraid to do. There can be no courage unless you're scared.
—Eddie Rickenbacker

Source: The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader by John C. Maxwell 1999. Thomas Nelson, Inc. ISBN: 0-7852-7440-5, page 39.
See also:
⇒ Auburn University's biographical sketch, Edward Vernon "Eddie" Rickenbacker.

You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, 'I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.' You must do the thing you think you cannot do.
—Eleanor Roosevelt

Source: The Quotations Page on Eleanor Roosevelt.
See also:
Biography of Eleanor Roosevelt at WhiteHouse.gov.

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June 8, 2007

As I Grow Older

The older I grow, the more I listen to people who don't talk much.
—Germain G. Glien

Source: Java House counter on June 8, 2007.
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June 1, 2007

Don't Give Up the Ship

ddg4_1973_05_04.jpg

US Navy Historical Center

USS Lawrence (DDG-4) underway

USS Lawrence (DDG-4) underway near Cape Henry, VA May 3, 1973. DDG-4 was one of five US Navy ships named in honor of Captain James Lawrence, War of 1812 naval hero.

Fight her 'til she sinks and don't give up the ship
—James Lawrence, Captain, USN

Source: New York Times On This Day for June 1, 2007: See 1813.
See also:
⇒ Wikipedia's James Lawrence.
⇒ Wikipedia's USS Chesapeake.

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May 24, 2007

Smoke Rings of My Mind

Then take me disappearin' through the smoke rings of my mind,
Down the foggy ruins of time, far past the frozen leaves,
The haunted, frightened trees, out to the windy beach,
Far from the twisted reach of crazy sorrow.
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free,
Silhouetted by the sea, circled by the circus sands,
With all memory and fate driven deep beneath the waves,
Let me forget about today until tomorrow.

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me,
I'm not sleepy and there is no place I'm going to.
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me,
In the jingle jangle morning I'll come followin' you.
—Bob Dylan in Mr. Tambourine Man

Source: Bob Dylan: Mr. Tambourine Man lyrics.
See also: It is the birthday of Bob Dylan, born Robert Zimmerman in Duluth, Minnesota (1941).
⇒ Wikipedia's bob Dylan.
⇒ Sony Record's BOBDYLAN.COM

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May 23, 2007

Letters We Should Have Burned

'Lives' of great men oft remind us as we o'er their pages turn,
That we too many leave behind us –
Letters that we ought to burn.
—Thomas Hood

Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, May 23, 2007.
See also:
⇒ Wikipedia's Thomas Hood who was born on this day in London in 1799. He died on May 3, 1845 in Camberwell, England.
⇒ Consider This March 10, 2004 entry Lives Sublime quote by Longfellow.

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May 18, 2007

Fear Thought?

2007_05_18_0748_mshvolcanocam.jpg

Mount St. Helens VolcanoCam

Mount St. Helens in early morning sunlight

Today is the 27th anniversary of the Sunday morning eruption of this Cascade Mountain range volcanoe in Southwest Washington. Photo grabbed 0748 May 18, 2007.

Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth—more than ruin—more even than death. ... Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit. Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid. Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man.
—Bertrand Russell

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, May 18, 2007.

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May 16, 2007

You Count

When you become part of something, in some way you count. It could be a march; it could be a rally, even a brief one. You're part of something, and you suddenly realize you count. To count is very important.
—Studs Terkel

Source: BrainyQuote.com's Studs Terkel Quotes.
It is the birthday of StudsTerkel, born Louis Terkel in the Bronx, New York City in 1912.
See also:
⇒ Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, May 16, 2007.
⇒ Wikipedia.org's Studs Terkel

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May 10, 2007

Tears and Sweat

All I have to offer is blood, toil, tears, and sweat.
—Winston Churchill, Acceptance Speech, 1940

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, May 10, 2007
⇒ It was on this day in 1940 that Winston Churchill took power as the prime minister of Great Britain, a position he would hold for the rest of World War II. He came to power at a very dark moment for Europe. In less than two years, almost all of Western Europe's mainland was either controlled by or allied with Nazi Germany. And then, on this day in 1940, Churchill became the prime minister.
⇒ See also: NobelPrize.org's Winston Churchill – Biography, Churchill was awarded The Nobel Prize in Literature for 1953

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May 2, 2007

Religion: Man-Made

The mildest criticism of religion is also the most radical and the most devastating one. Religion is man-made. Even the men who made it cannot agree on what their prophets or redeemers or gurus actually said or did. Still less can they hope to tell us the "meaning" of later discoveries and developments which were, when they began, either obstructed by their religions or denounced by them. And yet—the believers still claim to know!
—Christopher Hitchens

Source: Slate.com's blog Fighting Words: from: Christopher Hitchens Religion Poisons Everything; excerpt from Christopher Hitchens' book, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything.

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May 1, 2007

Hijacking of Morality

The greatest tragedy in mankind's history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
—Arthur C. Clarke, science fiction writer (1917–

Source: Java House counter on May 1, 2007.
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April 30, 2007

The experiment entrusted to American People

I dwell on this prospect with every satisfaction which an ardent love for my country can inspire, since there is no truth more thoroughly established than that there exists in the economy and course of nature an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness; between duty and advantage; between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity; since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty and the destiny of the republican model of government are justly considered, perhaps, as deeply, as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.
—President George Washington, New York City, April 30, 1789

Source: Yale Law School's, The Avalon Project First Inaugural Address of George Washington.
See also:
⇒ Library of Congress Presidential Inaugurations George Washington, First Inauguration, April 30, 1789.
⇒ White House's Biography of George Washington.

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April 26, 2007

Man Separated From Another Man

A branch cut off from the adjacent branch must of necessity be cut off from the whole tree also. So too a man when he is separated from another man has fallen off from the whole social community. Now as to a branch, another cuts it off, but a man by his own act separates himself from his neighbour when he hates him and turns away from him, and he does not know that he has at the same time cut himself off from the whole social system. Yet he has this privilege certainly from Zeus who framed society, for it is in our power to grow again to that which is near to us, and be to come a part which helps to make up the whole. However, if it often happens, this kind of separation, it makes it difficult for that which detaches itself to be brought to unity and to be restored to its former condition. Finally, the branch, which from the first grew together with the tree, and has continued to have one life with it, is not like that which after being cut off is then ingrafted, for this is something like what the gardeners mean when they say that it grows with the rest of the tree, but that it has not the same mind with it.
—Marcus Aurelius

Source: MIT's The Internet Classics Archive Book Eleven &ndash The Meditations By Marcus Aurelius
⇒ It is the birthday of Marcus Aurelius born in Rome in A.D. 121. He died in A.D. 180.
⇒ See: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, April 26, 2007
⇒ Read a short sketch biography of Marcus Aurelius

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April 23, 2007

Women and the Glass Ceiling

Mr. President, I don't know why it took us 200 years for one of us to get the job [of ambassador].
—Shirley Temple Black

Source: Creative Quotations from Shirley Temple Black
⇒ Shirley Temple Black was born on this day in 1928 in Santa Monica, California.
⇒ See WikiPedia's Shirley Temple.

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April 17, 2007

Oh, Such Sorrows

All sorrows can be borne, if you put them into a story.
—Isak Dinesen

It's all I have to bring today (26)

It's all I have to bring today—
This, and my heart beside—
This, and my heart, and all the fields—
And all the meadows wide—
Be sure you count—should I forget—
Some one the sum could tell—
This, and my heart, and all the Bees
Which in the Clover dwell.
—Emily Dickinson

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, April 17, 2007.
See also:
⇒ Online biography of Isak Dinesen/Karen Blixen.
⇒ Poets.org's Emily Dickinson.

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April 16, 2007

On Paying Inheritance Tax

I don't see why a man shouldn't pay an inheritance tax. If a Country is good enough to pay taxes to while you are living, it's good enough to pay in after you die. By the time you die you should be so used to paying taxes that it would just be almost second nature to you.
— Will Rogers

Source: Will Rogers Today online at Will Rogers on Taxes
See also:
⇒ The Official Site of Will Rogers Biography

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April 11, 2007

Apostrophe Abolition

The day after the abolition of the apostrophe, imagine the scene. Triumphant abolitionist sits down to write, "Goodbye to the apostrophe, we're not missing you a bit!" and finds that he can't.
—Lynne Truss in her book Eats, Shoots & Leaves

Source: Eats, Shoots & Leaves daily calendar, Saturday, April 7, 2007 entry.
See also:
Lynne Truss's Home page and;
⇒ Her Eats, Shoots & Leaves page.

April 10, 2007

My Father, So Ignorant; When I Was 14

When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much he had learned in seven years.
—Mark Twain, "Old Times on the Mississippi" Atlantic Monthly, 1874

Source: QuoteGarden.com's Father Quotes, Sayings about Fathers.
⇒ The Mark Twain House and Museum's The Man | Biography.

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April 9, 2007

Lee Surrenders to Grant

On April 9, 1865 after four years of Civil War, approximately 630,000 deaths and over 1 million casualties, General Robert E. Lee surrendered the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant, at the home of Wilmer and Virginia McLean in the rural town of Appomattox Court House, Virginia.
—Appomattox Court House National Historical Park

There is nothing left for me to do but to see Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths.
—General Robert E. Lee, CSA

Source: Appomattox Court House National Historical Park.
See also:
⇒ Fordham University's Modern History Sourcebook: Terms of Lee's Surrender At Appomattox, 1865

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: Air Force
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 4, 2007

Universe Out of Control

Understand that the universe
is forever out of control,
and that trying to dominate events
goes against the river's current.
If you believe in yourself,
will you need the belief of others?
If you are content with yourself,
will you need the approval of others?
If you accept yourself,
who will not accept you?
—Tao Te Ching

Source: Professor Frank Pajares Home at Emory University, and specifically, his Tao Te Ching page.

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: Coast Guard
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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April 3, 2007

Keep Close at My Heels

CHAPTER II

Having thus briefly introduced my reader to the world, and given him some idea of its form and situation, he will naturally be curious to know from whence it came, and how it was created. And, indeed, the clearing up of these points is absolutely essential to my history, inasmuch as if this world had not been formed, it is more than probable that this renowned island, on which is situated the city of New York, would never have had an existence. The regular course of my history, therefore, requires that I should proceed to notice the cosmogony or formation of this our globe.

And now I give my readers fair warning that I am about to plunge, for a chapter or two, into as complete a labyrinth as ever historian was perplexed withal; therefore, I advise them to take fast hold of my skirts, and keep close at my heels, venturing neither to the right hand nor to the left, lest they get bemired in a slough of unintelligible learning, or have their brains knocked out by some of those hard Greek names which will be flying about in all directions. But should any of them be too indolent or chicken-hearted to accompany me in this perilous undertaking, they had better take a short cut round, and wait for me at the beginning of some smoother chapter.
—Washington Irving from his Knickerbocker's History of New York, Complete

Project Gutenberg's Knickerbocker's History of New York, Complete by Washington Irving, originally published by W.B. Conkey Company in December, 1809.
⇒ Today, April 3rd, Washington Irving was born in New York City in 1783. He died November 28, 1859 in Tarrytown, New York.
See also:
⇒ WikiPedia's Washington Irving
⇒ Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, April 3, 2007

WashingtonPost.com's Faces of the Fallen: Navy
U.S. Service members who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

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March 31, 2007

Seeking Truth

If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.

I think, therefore I am.
—René Descartes

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Saturday, March 31, 2007.
See also: René Descartes short bio

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March 15, 2007

Run for It

What I admire is her optimism. Rationally considered, she could not have packed all her stuff into the house in one trip. But there are times when people will not accept rational limitations. Go for it. Because you just might pull it off. And she did. Mostly.

What's this about?
In such moments as these I see the pilot light of reckless courage fire reserves of fuel to meet the small challenges of daily life. A stubborn refusal to accept obvious limitations. A delight in taking risks and defying odds. She didn't notice me across the street. It wasn't a performance, but an innate personal response to a challenge. It's a miniscule example of what's brought to bear in far more heroic situations. People run into burning buildings to save a life out of the same inclination. It's just a matter of scale.

That's a good thing about us. Something to like. What seems improbable just might be possible. More often than not, given the options, we don't play it safe and dry. We run for it.
—Robert Fulghum

Source: RUN FOR IT published March 05, 2007, Written Sunday, March 4, 2007 Seattle, Washington by Robert Fulghum.

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March 14, 2007

World is Comprehensible

My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble minds. That deeply emotional conviction of the presence of a superior reasoning power, which is revealed in the incomprehensible universe, forms my idea of God.

The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is comprehensible.
—Albert Einstein

Dr. Albert Einstein was born on this day in 1879 at Ulm, Wuerttemberg, Germany. He died on April 18, 1955 at Princeton, New Jersey.
⇒ See the New York Times obituary Albert Einstein Dies in Sleep at 76; World Mourns Loss of Great Scientist
⇒ See the NobelPrize.org's Albert Einstein – Biography Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921.

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March 8, 2007

Protecting Free Thought We Hate

If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
—Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Source: BrainyQuote's Oliver Wendell Holmes Quotes
⇒ Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. was born on this day in 1841, in Boston, Massachusetts. He died of pneumonia in Washington, D.C. on March 6, 1935.
⇒ See his New York Times Obituary, Washington Holds Bright Memories of Justice Holmes's Long and Useful Life.
⇒ Also, Arlington National Cemetery's biography, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Captain and Brevet Colonel, U.S. Army, Associate Justice, U.S. Supreme Court.

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March 6, 2007

150 Years Since the Horrid Dred Scott Decision

The words 'people of the United States' and 'citizens' are synonymous terms, and mean the same thing. They both describe the political body who, according to our republican institutions, form the sovereignty, and who hold the power and conduct the Government through their representatives. They are what we familiarly call the 'sovereign people,' and every citizen is one of this people, and a constituent member of this sovereignty. The question before us is, whether the class of persons described in the plea in abatement compose a portion of this people, and are constituent members of this sovereignty? We think they are not, and that they are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word 'citizens' in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate [60 U.S. 393, 405] and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.
—Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, March 6, 1857

Source: U.S. Supreme Court DRED SCOTT v. SANDFORD, 60 U.S. 393 (1856) on FindLaw.com
Dred Scott Decision on the US National Archives and Records Administration Web site.
⇒ "The decision of Scott v. Sandford, considered by legal scholars to be the worst ever rendered by the Supreme Court, was overturned by the 13th and 14th amendments to the Constitution, which abolished slavery and declared all persons born in the United States to be citizens of the United States."—US National Archives and Records Administration
Dred Scott Case Collection of the Washington University in Saint Louis.

March 2, 2007

Just Getting Wet?

Some people walk in the rain, others just get wet.
—Roger Miller, musician (1936–1992)

Source: Java House counter on March 2, 2007.
Java House
210 W Evergreen Blvd # 400
Vancouver, WA 98660
(360) 737-2925
See also: Roger Miller – Official Website.

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February 28, 2007

Good Idea Source

The best way to have a good idea is to have a lot of ideas.
—Linus Pauling

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, February 28, 2007.
⇒ Linus Carl Pauling was born in Portland, Oregon, on February 28, 1901. He died on August 19, 1994 on his ranch near Big Sur in California.
See also:
Linus Pauling biography on the Oregon State University's Linus Pauling Institute.

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February 27, 2007

Let Us, Then, Be Up and Doing

A Psalm of Life

What The Heart Of The Young Man Said To The Psalmist.

Tell me not, in mournful numbers,
    Life is but an empty dream!
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
    And things are not what they seem.

Life is real! Life is earnest!
    And the grave is not its goal;
Dust thou art, to dust returnest,
    Was not spoken of the soul.

Not enjoyment, and not sorrow,
    Is our destined end or way;
But to act, that each to-morrow
    Find us farther than to-day.

Art is long, and Time is fleeting,
    And our hearts, though stout and brave,
Still, like muffled drums, are beating
    Funeral marches to the grave.

In the world's broad field of battle,
    In the bivouac of Life,
Be not like dumb, driven cattle!
    Be a hero in the strife!

Trust no Future, howe'er pleasant!
    Let the dead Past bury its dead!
Act, act in the living Present!
    Heart within, and God o'erhead!

Lives of great men all remind us
    We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
    Footprints on the sands of time;

Footprints, that perhaps another,
    Sailing o'er life's solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,
    Seeing, shall take heart again.

Let us, then, be up and doing,
    With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
    Learn to labor and to wait.
—Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

This is my tribute to the great American poet, Henry Wadsworth Lonfellow. Today is the 200th anniversary of his birth, having been born on February 27, 1807, in Portland, Maine. Longfellow died in Cambridge on March 24, 1882. In London his marble image is seen in Westminster Abbey, in the Poet's Corner.
⇒ See: Books & Writers short biography of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 1807–1882
⇒ Also: PoetryFoundation.org's Henry Wadsworth Longfellow that includes links to many of his works, including the above, A Psalm of Life.
⇒ It is also the birthday of my sweet Mother-in-Law, Ruth, who was born in Sweetwater, Oregon in 1918. Happy Birthday, Mom. I am honored to be your son-in-law.

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February 26, 2007

What Do You Browse?

You affect the world by what you browse.
—Tim Berners-Lee

Source: Time Berners-Lee Quotes on Brainy Quote dot com
WorldWideWeb was introduced on February 26, 1991, by Tim Berners-Lee, and ran on the NeXTSTEP platform. It was the world's first web browser and WYSIWYG HTML editor. It was later renamed Nexus to avoid confusion with the World Wide Web.
⇒ WorldWideWeb (WWW) was the first program which used not only the common File Transfer Protocol but also the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, invented by Berners-Lee in 1989. At the time it was written, WorldWideWeb was the only way to view the Web in 1991. See WorldWideWeb on Wikipedia.
⇒ Note: The Internet predates the World Wide Web, having as its earliest manifestation, the establishment of the four–node ARPANET in December 1969.

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February 23, 2007

Cheerful as Any Man Could Be

I went out to Charing Cross to see Major General Harrison hanged, drawn, and quartered; which was done there, he looking as cheerful as any man could in that condition.
—Samuel Pepys

Source: Samuel Pepys Quotes on BrainyQuote.com.
⇒ It is the birthday of the English diarist Samuel Pepys, born in London on this day, February 23rdin 1633.He died on Clapham (near London) on 26 May 1703.
See also:
⇒ Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, February 23, 2007.
Samuel Pepys on Wikipedia.org.

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February 15, 2007

Humble Reasoning

In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.
—Galileo Galilei

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, February 15, 2007.
⇒ It is the birthday of Galileo Galilei born in Pisa, Italy in 1564. He died in 1642 at his home outside Florence, Italy.
See also:
⇒ Rice University's The Galileo Project

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February 11, 2007

Twas Brillig

`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
  Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
  And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
  The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
  The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
  Long time the manxome foe he sought --
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
  And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
  The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
  And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
  The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
  He went galumphing back.

"And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?
  Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'
  He chortled in his joy.

`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
  Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
  And the mome raths outgrabe.
—Lewis Carroll JABBERWOCKY (from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1872)

Source: David Shaw's Jabberwocky.com, and specifically his quoting of Carroll's poem The Jabberwocky.
See also: on Wikipedia, Jabberwocky

mark lewis doing his rendition of the CS lewis poem on YouTube.com.

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February 9, 2007

Fundamental Connectedness

I have long thought that anyone who does not regularly gaze up and see the wonder and glory of a dark night sky filled with countless stars loses a sense of their fundamental connectedness to the universe.
—Brian Greene

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, February 9, 2007.
⇒ It is the birthday of physicist and science writer Brian Greene, born in New York City in 1963.
⇒ The Official String Theory Web site.

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February 8, 2007

Success: A Definition

To laugh often and much, to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children, to earn the appreciation of honest critics and to endure the betrayal of false friends, to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition, to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: The Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson

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February 1, 2007

Advice

Folks, I'm telling you,
Birthing is hard
And Dying is mean
So get yourself
Some loving in between.
—Langston Hughes &ndash Advice

Source: February 1st is the birthday of poet and novelist Langston Hughes, born in Joplin, Missouri in 1902. He died of cancer on May 22, 1967.
⇒ See: FamousPoetsandPoems.com's Langston Hughes Biography

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January 30, 2007

Happy Birthday, FDR

In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms.

The first is freedom of speech and expression--everywhere in the world.

The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way--everywhere in the world.

The third is freedom from want--which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants-everywhere in the world.

The fourth is freedom from fear--which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor--anywhere in the world.

That is no vision of a distant millennium. It is a definite basis for a kind of world attainable in our own time and generation. That kind of world is the very antithesis of the so-called new order of tyranny which the dictators seek to create with the crash of a bomb.
—Franklin D. Roosevelt

Source: Annual Message to Congress, January 6, 1941 [commonly referred to as the Four Freedoms Speech] by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Thirty-Second President 1933-1945.
President Roosevelt was born on this day in 1882 in Hyde Park, New York. He died: April 12, 1945 in Warm Springs, Georgia.
See WhiteHouse.gov's very short biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

January 29, 2007

Crisis vs Day-to-Day Living

Any idiot can face a crisis; it is this day-to-day living that wears you out.
—Anton Chekhov

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Monday, January 29, 2007
It's the birthday of writer Anton Chekhov, born in Taganrog, Russia in 1860. He died of tuberculosis at the health spa of Badenweiler, Germany, on 15 July 1904.
See:
⇒ books and writers' short biography of Anton Chekhov
⇒ Works by Anton Chekhov.

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January 26, 2007

Forgiveness, the Cement of Community Life

Community is not possible without the willingness to forgive one another 'seventy-seven times' [which means infinity times infinity] (see Matthew 18:22). Forgiveness is the cement of community life. Forgiveness holds us together through good and bad times, and it allows us to grow in mutual love.

But what is there to forgive or to ask forgiveness for? As people who have hearts that long for perfect love, we have to forgive one another for not being able to give or receive that perfect love in our everyday lives. Our many needs constantly interfere with our desire to be there for the other unconditionally. Our love is always limited to spoken or unspoken conditions. What needs to be forgiven? We need to forgive one another for not being God!
—Henri J. M. Nouwen

Source: The January 24 entry of Bread for the Journey: A Daybook of Wisdom and Faith by Henri J. M. Nouwen. HarperSanFrancisco 1996 ISBN13: 978-0060663766.
Thank you, David,for sharing this with me via a recent email. Blessings, dear friend.

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January 17, 2007

Have One Hell of a Time

We seem to be going through a period of nostalgia, and everyone seems to think yesterday was better than today. I don't think it was, and I would advise you not to wait ten years before admitting today was great. If you're hung up on nostalgia, pretend today is yesterday and just go out and have one hell of a time.
—Art Buchwald

Source: thinkexist.com's Art Buchwald quotes.
See also:
Art Buchwald passed away on Wednesday, January 17, 2007 in Washington, DC. He was born on Oct. 20, 1925, in Mount Vernon, N.Y.
Wikipedia's Art Buchwald.
NY Times Art Buchwald obituary. [May require free registration]
NY Times The Last Word: Art Buchwald. [May require free registration]

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January 16, 2007

Happy Birthday, Robert W. Service (1874-1958)

And there sat Sam, looking cool and calm, in the heart of the furnace roar
And he wore a smile you could see a mile,
and he said: "Please close that door.
It's fine in here, but I greatly fear you'll let in the cold and storm --
Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee,
it's the first time I've been warm."
—Robert W. Service

Source: Extract from The Cremation of Sam McGee by Robert W. Service in his collection poems The Spell of the Yukon and Other Verses published 1907
Today is the birthday of Robert W. Service, born in Preston, England in 1874 and died in Lancieux, Ctes-d'Armor, in Brittany, France on September 11, 1958.
It has been a tradition and an honor of mine to recite this poem (from the heart) at the campfire during our Annual Men's Gatherings, for the last 14 years at Buffalo Gap Camp, Capon Bridge, West Virgina.

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January 10, 2007

One of the Greatest Blunders in Military History

During the Second World War, the Germans took four years to build the Atlantic Wall. On four beaches it held up the Allies for about an hour; at Omaha it held up the U.S. for less than one day. The Atlantic Wall must therefore be regarded as one of the greatest blunders in military history.
—Stephen Ambrose

Source: Stephen Ambrose Quotes – The Quotations Page
Attributed to D Day: June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II by Stephen Ambrose Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (June 1, 1995) ISBN-13: 978-0684801377
Stephen Ambrose was born on this day in Decatur, Illinois (1936). He died on October 13, 2002 in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.

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January 9, 2007

Not a Crook?

You won't have Nixon to kick around anymore, because, gentlemen, this is my last press conference.
—Richard M. Nixon, 1962

On May 22 [1973], I stated in very specific termsand I state again to every one of you listening tonight these factsI had no prior knowledge of the Watergate break-in; I neither took part in nor knew about any of the subsequent coverup activities; I neither authorized nor encouraged subordinates to engage in illegal or improper campaign tactics.

That was and that is the simple truth.
—Richard M. Nixon

I'm not a crook.
—Richard M. Nixon, November 17, 1973, during a press conference.

Source: New York Times Richard M. Nixon obituary, The 37th President; In Three Decades by John Herbers April 24, 1994.
Former President Richard M. Nixon was born on this day in 1913, in Yorba Linda, California. He died April 22, 1994 in New York City, New York. Following the Watergate scandal, Nixon resigned from the Presidency on August 9, 1974.
See also:
1. watergate.info's Nixon's Second Watergate Speech: August 15, 1973.
2. White House.gov's Richard M. Nixon

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January 8, 2007

Gotta Move

Music should be something that makes you gotta move, inside or outside.
—Elvis Presley

Source: Elvis Presley Quotes on ThinkExist.com.
Elvis was born on this day in 1935 in Tupelo, Mississippi. He died in Memphis, Tennessee on August, 16, 1977.
It is also the birthday of physicist, Stephen Hawking, born in 1942 in Oxford, England.

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January 3, 2007

On Exporting Democracy

Because of our basic unity, we can afford to be divided on specific issues. Democracy is about differences and contesting them in the public sphere, and it only works when there is basic agreement about the fundamentals. We should feel fortunate that we have a democratic history and set of beliefs. Those beliefs can be imported by those who want them and dont have them, but they cant be exported. We can only create a context where others would want to import them.
—Michael Mandelbaum in his book, The Case for Goliath

Source: A Hanging and a Funeral by Thomas L. Friedman published in the New York Times, Wednesday, January 3, 2007. [requires registration and subscription for op-ed piece]
See also:
The Case for Goliath: How American Acts as the World's Government in the Twenty-First Century by Michael Mandelbaum at Powell's Books.

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December 26, 2006

Victory at Trenton, 1776

In justice to the Officers and Men, I must add, that their Behaviour upon this Occasion, reflects the highest honor upon them. The difficulty of passing the River in a very severe Night, and their march thro' a violent Storm of Snow and Hail, did not in the least abate their Ardour. But when they came to the Charge, each seemed to vie with the other in pressing forward, and were I to give a preference to any particular Corps, I should do great injustice to the others.
—General George Washington, 1776

Source: The Library of Congress' The Learning Page, Washington Describes Victory at Trenton, New Jersey, December 27, 1776
On this day, December 26, 1776, the American Continental Army defeated the Hessian soldiers garrisoned in support of the British Army at Trenton, New Jersey, after crossing the Delaware River in the late evening of Christmas Day.

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December 24, 2006

Christmas Eve, Bandung, Indonesia

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there;
The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of sugarplums danced in their heads.
—Clement Clarke Moore [or, perhaps, Major Henry Livingston, Jr.] The Night Before Christmas

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Sunday, December 24, 2006
The original title of the poem, published anonymously in a New York City paper in 1823, was Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas.
See also:
The Definitive Bibliography of the Night Before Christmas
Children world-wide track Santa Claus [English language version]as he makes his journey across the globe.
Mama and I are spending Christmas with our two Grandsons, Alex and Asher, in Bandung, Indonesia.

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December 19, 2006

Done Me Good: A Christmas Carol

I have always thought of Christmas time, as ... the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys. And therefore ... though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that it has done me good, and will do me good; and I say, God bless it!
—Charles Dickens

I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it.

Their faithful Friend and Servant, C.D.

December, 1843.
—Charles Dickens, Preface to A Christmas Carol

Source: Garrison Keillor's A Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, December, 19, 2006
It was on this day in 1843 that Charles Dickens published A Christmas Carol.
See also: Literature.org's A Christmas Carol

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December 17, 2006

Only Art

Only Art held [me] back; for it seemed unthinkable for me to leave the world forever before I had produced all that I felt called upon to produce.
—Ludwig van Beethoven

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Sunday, December 17, 2006
It was on this day that Beethoven was baptized in 1770 in the city of Bonn, which would eventually become part of Germany. No one knows for sure when he was born. He died on March 26th 1827 in Vienna, Austria.
See also: Beethoven's Website's Biography: Ludwig von Beethoven

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December 10, 2006

After Great Pain

After great pain, a formal feeling comes
The Nerves sit ceremonious, like Tombs
The stiff Heart questions was it He, that bore,
And Yesterday, or Centuries before?

The Feet, mechanical, go round
Of Ground, or Air, or Ought
A Wooden way
Regardless grown,
A Quartz contentment, like a stone

This is the hour of Lead
Remembered, if outlived
As Freezing persons, recollect the Snow
First Chill then Stupor then the letting go
—Emily Dickinson in her poem After great pain, a formal feeling comes

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Sunday, Dec. 10, 2006
Note: Emily Dickinson was born on this date in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1830 and died there on May 15, 1886. See Modern American Poetry's Emily Dickinson's Life

Our daughter, Mary, sings Cecak, an Indonesian lullaby

powered by ODEO and STUDIO ODEO

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December 7, 2006

Pearl Harbor Day: 2006

Congressional Medal of Honor
SAMUEL GLENN FUQUA


Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Navy, U.S.S. Arizona.
Place and date: Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, 7 December 1941. Entered service at: Laddonia, Missouri.
Born: 15 October 1899, Laddonia Mo.

Upon the commencement of the attack, Lt. Comdr. Fuqua rushed to the quarterdeck of the U.S.S. Arizona to which he was attached where he was stunned and knocked down by the explosion of a large bomb which hit the guarterdeck, penetrated several decks, and started a severe fire. Upon regaining consciousness, he began to direct the fighting of the fire and the rescue of wounded and injured personnel. Almost immediately there was a tremendous explosion forward, which made the ship appear to rise out of the water, shudder, and settle down by the bow rapidly. The whole forward part of the ship was enveloped in flames which were spreading rapidly, and wounded and burned men were pouring out of the ship to the quarterdeck. Despite these conditions, his harrowing experience, and severe enemy bombing and strafing, at the time, Lt. Comdr. Fuqua continued to direct the fighting of fires in order to check them while the wounded and burned could be taken from the ship and supervised the rescue of these men in such an amazingly calm and cool manner and with such excellent judgment that it inspired everyone who saw him and undoubtedly resulted in the saving of many lives. After realizing the ship could not be saved and that he was the senior surviving officer aboard, he directed it to be abandoned, but continued to remain on the quarterdeck and directed abandoning ship and rescue of personnel until satisfied that all personnel that could be had been saved, after which he left his ship with the boatload. The conduct of Lt. Comdr. Fuqua was not only in keeping with the highest traditions of the naval service but characterizes him as an outstanding leader of men.
—extract from Captain Fuqua's Congresional Medal of Honor citation

Source: WorldWarIIHistory.net's Congressional Medal of Honor Heroes of Pearl Harbor
See also:
1. Consider This in 2005: Remember Pearl Harbor, 07 DEC 1941 About Dorie Miller.
2. Consider This in 2004: Pearl Harbor Attacked, Dec. 7, 1941 About FDR's Speech.
3. USS Arizona National Memorial (US National Park Service
4. Pear Harbor Survivors Project
5. Arlington National Cemetery's Samuel Glenn Fuqua Rear Admiral, United States Navy

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December 4, 2006

Forgiveness

Understanding is often a prelude to forgiveness, but they are not the same, and we often forgive what we cannot understand (seeing nothing else to do) and understand what we cannot pardon.
—Mary McCarthy (1912 - 1989) US novelist, critic

Source: The Writing on the Wall and Other Literary Essays; on Creative Quotations by Mary McCarthy See also:
»
Mary McCarthy on Wikipedia
» Featured Author: Mary McCarthy on the New York Times online. [Requires free registration and log-in]

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Love and Gratitude of George Washington

With a heart full of love and gratitude I now take leave of you. I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorableIshall feel obliged if each of you will come and take me by the hand.
—General George Washington

Source: Washington's farewell to his officers, December 4, 1783, as he received the officers of the victorious Continental Army in the Long Room of Fraunces Tavern, on the corner of Pearl and Broad Streets, in lower Manhattan, New York City.
See also:
» Fraunces Tavern Museum article Washington Said Farewell To Officers At Fraunces Tavern At War's End
» Library of Congress American Memory for Today in History: December 04

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December 2, 2006

Challenges - Purpose?

Challenges make you discover things about yourself you never really knew. They're what make the instrument stretch–what make you go beyond the norm.
—Cicely Tyson

Source: December 1st entry: Office Perpetual Calendar by Judy Johannesen, Haymarket, Virginia

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December 1, 2006

Cannot Escape History

Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. We of this Congress and this Administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation. We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We know how to save the Union. The world knows we do know how to save it.

We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free,--honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last, best hope of earth. Other means may succeed; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just,--a way which, if followed, the world will forever applaud, and God must forever bless.
—Abraham Lincoln

Source: State of the Union Address to United States Congress by President Abraham Lincoln on December 1, 1862. These are President Lincoln's concluding paragraphs to this address.
See: State of the Union Addresses by Abraham Lincoln at the Gutenberg Project
See also: Biography of Abraham Lincoln at WhiteHouse.gov.

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November 30, 2006

About Love: Mark Twain

After all these years, I see that I was mistaken about Eve in the beginning; it is better to live outside the Garden with her than inside it without her. At first I thought she talked too much; but now I should be sorry to have that voice fall silent and pass out of my life. Blessed be the chestnut that brought us near together and taught me to know the goodness of her heart and the sweetness of her spirit!
—Mark Twain

Source: Adam's Diary by Mark Twain cited on TwainQuotes.com – Category LOVE
It is the birthday of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, pen name: Mark Twain, born in Florida, Missouri in 1835. He died on April 21, 1910 in Redding, Connecticut.
See also:
» Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, November 30, 2007.
» Mark Twain in His Times by the University of Virginia Library's The Electronic Text Center.
» Mark Twain on Wikipedia.org.

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November 28, 2006

Believe in Freedom of Speech?

If we don't believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don't believe in it at all.
—Noam Chomsky

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: The Noam Chomsky Web site

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November 21, 2006

Edison and Mary Had A Little Lamb

Mary had a little lamb its fleece was white as snow;
And everywhere that Mary went, the lamb was sure to go.
It followed her to school one day, which was against the rule;
It made the children laugh and play, to see a lamb at school.
And so the teacher turned it out, but still it lingered near,
And waited patiently about till Mary did appear.
"Why does the lamb love Mary so?" the eager children cry;
"Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know" the teacher did reply.
—Sarah Hale, of Boston, Massachusetts, USA 1830

It was on this day (Nov. 21st) in 1877 that Thomas Edison announced that he had invented a new device for recording and playing back sound, which he called the phonograph. He had been working on a device to record telephone communication when he stumbled upon the right design, using a stylus and a tinfoil cylinder. The first thing he recorded was himself reciting the poem "Mary Had a Little Lamb."
—Garrison Keillor

Source: Rhymes.org.uk's Mary Had a Little Lamb
Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2006

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November 19, 2006

Gettysburg Address Anniversary

...that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.
—Abraham Lincoln November 19, 1863

Source: University of Oklahoma Law Center's U.S. Historical Documents Collection
Read Lincoln's Gettysburg Address on this blog, Consider This.
See also my Nov. 19, 2005 entry on this blog Path of American Destiny.
This 2006 entry is dedicated to a former colleague, Krista Price, at Heald College, Portland, Oregon campus. Krista always wanted me to memorize Lincoln's speech, but sadly, I've not yet accomplished her envisioned achievement. I promise, Krista, someday soon I will do so, and perhaps we will meet again.

Awaken to the Storyteller Within

Each of us has a story to tell, a story to share with the world.
Artists and writers are in the storytelling business. Others have different ways of telling and sharing their stories. The tackle shop owner sells bait, hooks, and sinkers and tells people where to fish and about the big one that got away. The master carpenter tells his story by carving and hanging a wooden door so well crafted that it swings shut gently on its own. The quilter tells her story by commemorating important moments from her life in her quilts that are colorful works of art.
Each of us has a story to tell and our own way of sharing it with the world. It comes out through our words, through our work, and through the simple actions of our daily life. Listen to the stories of people around you. Listen with your soul. Learn to value without judging and listen with an open heart to the beauty of each story and the importance of the storyteller. Learn to value and and appreciate the story you are living now.
Awaken to the storyteller within and share your story with the world. Tell it with joy and flair. Commit to telling it with love and passion. Tell it through living your life fully, doing your work well, and creating the best life you can. Be who you are and love being that.

Live your life from your heart. Share
from your heart. And your story will
touch and heal people's souls.
— Melody Beattie

Source: November 19 entry of Journey to the Heart: Daily Meditations on the Path to Freeing Your Soul by Melody Beattie 1996 HarperSanFrancisco ISBN: 0-060251121-1(pbk.)
See also: MelodyBeattie.com

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November 16, 2006

Want to Improve the World?

The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart amd head and hands, and then work outward from there.
—Robert M. Pirsig

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, January 12, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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November 14, 2006

Get to Sea as Soon as I Can

Call me Ishmael. Some years ago - never mind how long precisely - having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen, and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people's hats off - then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can. This is my substitute for pistol and ball. With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship. There is nothing surprising in this. If they but knew it, almost all men in their degree, some time or other, cherish very nearly the same feelings towards the ocean with me.
—Herman Melville

On this day in 1851, Harper & Brothers published Moby-Dick, by Herman Melville (books by this author). The British publisher accidentally left out the ending of the book, the epilogue. This confused a lot of British readers, because without the epilogue there was no explanation of how Ishmael, the narrator, lived to tell the tale. It seemed like he died in the end with everyone else on the ship. The reviews from Britain were harsh, and costly to Melville. At the time, Americans deferred to British critical opinion, and a lot of American newspaper editors reprinted reviews from Britain without actually reading the American version with the proper ending. Melville had just bought a farm in Massachusetts, his debts were piling up, he was hiding them from his wife, and he was counting on Moby-Dick to bring in enough money to pay off his creditors. The book flopped, partly because of those British reviews. As a writer, Melville never recovered from the disappointment.
—Garrions Keillor

Source: online Moby Dick by Herman Melville online by Princeton University
See also: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, November 14, 2006

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November 9, 2006

Dissent vs Disloyalty

We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty. When the loyal opposition dies, I think the soul of America dies with it.
—Edward R. Murrow

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8

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November 8, 2006

Tolerable and Awful

The Iraq war has turned into a sucking chest wound for our country infecting its unity at home and its standing abroad. No one can predict what Iraq will look like 10 years from now. I wish it well. But in the near term, it is clear, nothing that well feel particularly proud of, nothing that well feel justifies the vast expenditure of lives and treasure, is going to come out of Iraq.

These are our real choices in Iraq now: tolerable and awful. Its time we choose. No more expending lives and treasure for nothing good. The only way we can pursue good in the world again is by either shrinking our presence in Iraq, if Iraqis will step up, or leaving entirely, if they wont.
—Thomas L. Friedman, New York Times columnist

Source: Extract from Thomas L. Friedman: Tolerable or Awful: The Roads Left in Iraq New York Times, November 8, 2006 [requires registration & premium subscription]

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November 5, 2006

Happy Trails

Grand Comic Database

Roy Rogers: King of the Cowboys

Roy Rogers on the cover of a 1942 Dell comic book

Happy trails to you, until we meet again.
Happy trails to you, keep smilin' until then.
Who cares about the clouds when we're together?
Just sing a song and bring the sunny weather.
Happy trails to you, 'till we meet again.
—Dale Evans Rogers; lyrics from her song Happy Trails

Source: Happy Trails song lyrics on Wikipedia.org
It's the birthday of the "King of the Cowboys," Roy Rogers, born Leonard Franklin Slye in Cincinnati, Ohio (1911). He was my boyhood hero as I was growing up in the 1950's in central New Jersey. He was to me, I think, as Clancy of the Overflow was to my mom growing up in New South Wales, Australia in the 1920's and 30's. Roy Rogers passed away July, 6, 1998.
See also: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Sunday, November 5, 2006.

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November 2, 2006

Never Been Lost?

I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks.
—Daniel Boone

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, November 2, 2006 Daniel Boone was born on this date near Reading, Pennsylvania in 1734.
See also: American West's short biographical sketch Daniel Boone

October 27, 2006

Create Your Own Merit

Never depend on the admiration of others.There is no strength in it. Personal merit cannot be derived from an external source. It is not to be found in your personal associations, nor can it be found in the regard of other people. It is a fact of life that other people, even people who love you, will not necessarily agree with your ideas, understand you, or share your enthusiasms. Grow up! Who cares what other people think about you!

Create your own merit.

Personal merit cannot be achieved through your associations with people of excellence. You have been given your own work to do. Get to it right now, do your best at it, and don't be concerned who is watching you.

Do your own useful work without regard to the honor or admiration your efforts might win from others. There is no such thing as vicarious merit.

Other people's triumphs and excellences belong to them. Likewise, your possessions may have excellence, but you don't derive excellence from them.
—Epictetus

Source: page 12 of The Art of Living: The Classic Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness: A New Interpretation by Sharon Lebell 1995 by Sharon Lebell HarperSanFrancisco ISBN: 006-251322-2(cloth)
See also: The Internet Encylcopedia of Philosphy's Epictetus

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October 24, 2006

See Things For What They are

Circumstances do not rise to meet our expectations. Events happen as they do. People behave as they are. Embrace what you actually get.

Open your eyes: See things for what they really are, thereby sparing yourself the pain of false attachments and avoidable devastation.

When something happens, the only thing in your power is your attitude toward it; you can either accept it or resent it.

Things and people are not what we wish them to be nor what they seem to be. They are what they are.
—Epictetus

Source: page 7 of The Art of Living: The Classic Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness: A New Interpretation by Sharon Lebell 1995 by Sharon Lebell HarperSanFrancisco ISBN: 006-251322-2(cloth)
See also: The Internet Encylcopedia of Philosphy's Epictetus

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October 20, 2006

Rhythmical Words

The longer I live, the more I see there's something about reciting rhythmical words aloudit's almost biologicalthat comforts and enlivens human beings.
—Robert Pinsky

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, October 20, 2006

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October 17, 2006

Act Well the Part That is Given to You

We are like actors in a play. The divine will has assigned us our roles in life without consulting us. Some of us will act in a short drama, others in a long one. We might be assigned the part of a poor person, a cripple, a distinguished celebrity or public leader, or an ordinary private citizen.

Although we can't control which roles are assigned to us, it must be our business to act our given role as best we possibly can and to refrain from complaining about it. Wherever you find yourself and in whatever circumstances, give an impeccable performance.

If you are supposed to be a reader, read; if you are supposed to be a writer, write.
—Epictetus

Source: The Art of Living: The Classic Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness: A New Interpretation by Sharon Lebell 1995 by Sharon Lebell HarperSanFrancisco ISBN: 006-251322-2(cloth)
See also: The Internet Encylcopedia of Philosphy's Epictetus

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October 11, 2006

Feeling Inferior?

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
—Eleanor Roosevelt, born this day in 1884 in New York City

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, October 11, 2006
and Biography of Eleanor Roosevelt at WhiteHouse.gov

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September 19, 2006

Washington's Farwell to the Nation

To the efficacy and permanency of your union a government for the whole is indispensable. No alliances, however strict, between the parts can be an adequate substitute. They must inevitably experience the infractions and interruptions which all alliances in all times have experienced. Sensible of this momentous truth, you have improved upon your first essay by the adoption of a Constitution of Government better calculated than your former for an intimate union and for the efficacious management of your common concerns. This Government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its powers, uniting security with energy, and containing within itself a provision for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acquiescence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental maxims of true liberty. The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the constitution which at any time exists till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government...

Toward the preservation of your Government and the permanency of your present happy state, it is requisite not only that you steadily discountenance irregular oppositions to its acknowledged authority, but also that you resist with care the spirit of innovation upon its principles, however specious the pretexts. One method of assault may be to effect in the forms of the Constitution alterations which will impair the energy of the system, and thus to undermine what can not be directly overthrown. In all the changes to which you may be invited remember that time and habit are at least as necessary to fix the true character of governments as of other human institutions; that experience is the surest standard by which to test the real tendency of the existing constitution of a country; that facility in changes upon the credit of mere hypothesis and opinion exposes to perpetual change, from the endless variety of hypothesis and opinion; and remember especially that for the efficient management of your common interests in a country so extensive as ours a government of as much vigor as is consistent with the perfect security of liberty is indispensable. Liberty itself will find in such a government, with powers properly distributed and adjusted, its surest guardian. It is, indeed, little else than a name where the government is too feeble to withstand the enterprises of faction, to con-fine each member of the society within the limits prescribed by the laws, and to maintain all in the secure and tranquil enjoyment of the rights of person and property.
—President George Washington, excerpt from his letter of September 17, 1796

Source: U.S. State Department's Basic Readings in Democracy, FAREWELL ADDRESS (1796), George Washington
Although his farewell was never given orally by the President, it was first published in Philadelphia's American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796. It was subsequently published in many newspapers throughout the United States
The U.S. Senate has had a tradition since 1896 of reading the President's Farewell on his birthday, February 22nd in legislative session, according to the Senate's Art & History History Minutes.
I think this excerpt is particularly pertinent to the September 2006 debates before the House and Senate regarding President George W. Bush's proposed Military Commissions legislation.

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September 12, 2006

Young Not Prudent and That's Fortunate for All

The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore they attempt the impossible
–and achieve it, generation after generation.
—Pearl S. Buck, 1892-1973, Pulitzer (1932) and Nobel Prize (1938) Winning Author

Source: Pearl S. Buck on Achieving the Impossible of Sep. 12, 2006 at Brainfuel.tv
See also: Pearl Buck – Biography at NobelPrize.org
Also: Pearl Buck was awarded the 1932 Pulitzer Prize in Letters & Drama, Novel for The Good Earth, see: Pulitzer Prizes.org

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September 11, 2006

Only a Boche or a Someone Who's an Enemy

We brought him in from between the lines: we'd better have let him lie;

For what's the use of risking one's skin for a TYKE that's going to die?
What's the use of tearing him loose under a gruelling fire,
When he's shot in the head, and worse than dead,
and all messed up on the wire?

However, I say, we brought him in. DIABLE! The mud was bad;
The trench was crooked and greasy and high, and oh, what a time we had!
And often we slipped, and often we tripped, but never he made a moan;
And how we were wet with blood and with sweat!
but we carried him in like our own.

Now there he lies in the dug-out dim, awaiting the ambulance,
And the doctor shrugs his shoulders at him,
and remarks, "He hasn't a chance."
And we squat and smoke at our game of bridge
on the glistening, straw-packed floor,
And above our oaths we can hear his breath deep-drawn in a kind of snore.

For the dressing station is long and low, and the candles gutter dim,
And the mean light falls on the cold clay walls
and our faces bristly and grim;
And we flap our cards on the lousy straw, and we laugh and jibe as we play,
And you'd never know that the cursed foe was less than a mile away.
As we con our cards in the rancid gloom, oppressed by that snoring breath,
You'd never dream that our broad roof-beam was swept by the broom of death.

Heigh-ho! My turn for the dummy hand; I rise and I stretch a bit;
The fetid air is making me yawn, and my cigarette's unlit,
So I go to the nearest candle flame, and the man we brought is there,
And his face is white in the shabby light, and I stand at his feet and stare.
Stand for a while, and quietly stare: for strange though it seems to be,
The dying Boche on the stretcher there has a queer resemblance to me.

It gives one a kind of a turn, you know, to come on a thing like that.
It's just as if I were lying there, with a turban of blood for a hat,
Lying there in a coat grey-green instead of a coat grey-blue,
With one of my eyes all shot away, and my brain half tumbling through;
Lying there with a chest that heaves like a bellows up and down,
And a cheek as white as snow on a grave, and lips that are coffee brown.

And confound him, too! He wears, like me, on his finger a wedding ring,
And around his neck, as around my own, by a greasy bit of string,
A locket hangs with a woman's face, and I turn it about to see:
Just as I thought . . . on the other side the faces of children three;
Clustered together cherub-like, three little laughing girls,
With the usual tiny rosebud mouths and the usual silken curls.
"Zut!" I say. "He has beaten me; for me, I have only two,"
And I push the locket beneath his shirt, feeling a little blue.

Oh, it isn't cheerful to see a man, the marvellous work of God,
Crushed in the mutilation mill, crushed to a smeary clod;
Oh, it isn't cheerful to hear him moan; but it isn't that I mind,
It isn't the anguish that goes with him, it's the anguish he leaves behind.
For his going opens a tragic door that gives on a world of pain,
And the death he dies, those who live and love, will die again and again.

So here I am at my cards once more, but it's kind of spoiling my play,
Thinking of those three brats of his so many a mile away.
War is war, and he's only a Boche, and we all of us take our chance;
But all the same I'll be mighty glad when I'm hearing the ambulance.
One foe the less, but all the same I'm heartily glad I'm not
The man who gave him his broken head, the sniper who fired the shot.

No trumps you make it, I think you said? You'll pardon me if I err;
For a moment I thought of other things . . .
   MON DIEU! QUELLE VACHE DE GUERRE.
—Robert W. Service Only a Boche

Source: Rhymes of a Red Cross Man by Robert W. Service, published in 1916
excerpted from the Project Gutenberg's online text version of Rhymes of a Red Cross Man, by Robert W. Service
I am the grateful recipient of a 1916 original copy of Service's book, Rhymes of a Red Cross Man given to me by my dear friend Ernie, at our Men's Gathering in Buffalo Gap Camp in West Virginia in October 1, 2, & 3, 2004. Thank you so very much, Brother Ernie.

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September 6, 2006

A Prayer

May I become at all times, both now and forever
A protector for those without protection
A guide for those who have lost their way
A ship for those with oceans to cross
A bridge for those with rivers to cross
A sanctuary for those in danger
A lamp for those without light
A place of refuge for those who lack shelter
And a servant to all in need.
—atributed to His Holiness, the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Monday, September 4, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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September 4, 2006

The Old Australian Ways

US Navy photo by PH1 Bruce McVicar

PREBLE and JOHN PAUL JONES visit Portland, Oregon (Jun 10, 2006)

AEGIS Arleigh Burke class Guided missile destroyers USS John Paul Jones (DG 53) and USS Preble (DDG 88) moored in Portland for the 99th Rose Festival.

I am proud to say thatI helped build these ships when I worked at the AEGIS Program Office in the 1990's.

The London lights are far abeam
Behind a bank of cloud,
Along the shore the gaslights gleam,
The gale is piping loud;
And down the Channel, groping blind,
We drive her through the haze
Towards the land we left behind --
The good old land of `never mind',
And old Australian ways.

The narrow ways of English folk
Are not for such as we;
They bear the long-accustomed yoke
Of staid conservancy:
But all our roads are new and strange,
And through our blood there runs
The vagabonding love of change
That drove us westward of the range
And westward of the suns.
 .......
So throw the weary pen aside
And let the papers rest,
For we must saddle up and ride
Towards the blue hill's breast;
And we must travel far and fast
Across their rugged maze,
To find the Spring of Youth at last,
And call back from the buried past
The old Australian ways.

When Clancy took the drover's track
In years of long ago,
He drifted to the outer back
Beyond the Overflow;
By rolling plain and rocky shelf,
With stockwhip in his hand,
He reached at last, oh lucky elf,
The Town of Come-and-help-yourself
In Rough-and-ready Land.

And if it be that you would know
The tracks he used to ride,
Then you must saddle up and go
Beyond the Queensland side --
Beyond the reach of rule or law,
To ride the long day through,
In Nature's homestead -- filled with awe
You then might see what Clancy saw
And know what Clancy knew.
—A.B. "Banjo" Paterson, excerpted from THE OLD AUSTRALIAN WAYS

Source: A.B. Paterson: Selected Poems published 1992 by Angus & Robertson Book ISBN 0-207-1726-4
See the online version at THE OLD AUSTRALIAN WAYS

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August 28, 2006

Hear a Little Song, Every Day

One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.
—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Monday, August 28, 2006
It is the birthday of Goethe, born this day in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, in 1749. Goethe died in Weimar on March 22, 1832.
Read a short biographical sketch of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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August 25, 2006

Give Me A Kiss

Give me a kiss, and to that kiss a score;
Then to that twenty, add a hundred more:
A thousand to that hundred: so kiss on,
To make that thousand up a million.
Treble that million, and when that is done,
Let's kiss afresh, as when we first begun.
—Robert Herrick, English Poet (1591–1674)

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, August 24, 2006
See also: Luminarium.org's Life of Robert Herrick

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August 24, 2006

Human Relations Most Important

Don't sacrifice your life to work and ideals.
The most important things in life are human relations.
I found that out too late.
—Katharinde Susannah Prichard, Australian Author

Source: My beautiful bride, Carol, suggested this one. Thanks, Sweetheart

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August 23, 2006

Intellect and Personality

We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality.
—Albert Einstein

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, July 27, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: Nobel Foundation's The Nobel Prize in Physics 1921 Albert Einstein — Biography

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August 17, 2006

Sad Words

For all sad words of tongue and pen, the saddest are these, 'It might have been.'
—John Greenleaf Whittier

Source: My wonderful bride, Carol, shared this one with me today!
See also: Selected Poetry of John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) on the University of Toronto's Representative Poetry Online (RPO).
Wikipedia's article, John Greenleaf Whittier.

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August 14, 2006

Teaching Children to Think

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.
—Margaret Mead

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, August 5/6, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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August 7, 2006

Major Miracles

Teachers perform major miracles in America, daily.
—Meryl Streep

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, August 1, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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August 1, 2006

Do You Prefer Fire or Ice?

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those that favor fire.
But if I had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.
—Robert Frost in his poem Fire and Ice

Source: The Road Not Taken: A selection of Robert Frost's Poems with an Introduction and Commentary by Louis Untermeyer Owl Books 1985 ISBN 0-8050-0528-5 (An Owl Book: pbk.)
See also: Rice University's [minstrels] Fire and Ice -----Robert Frost with comments.

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July 29, 2006

Democracy Really Works

F-14 last cat from CVN-71

USN | by MCSNSheldon Rowley

Final launch of the F-14 Tomcat

Atlantic Ocean (July 28, 2006) Aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), an F-14D Tomcat assigned to the "Tomcatters" of Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31), aircraft number 112, accelerates down the ships number three catapult during the final launch of an F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft. The last launch marks the end of an era for Naval Aviation. The F-14 will officially retire in September 2006, after 32 years of service to the fleet. Theodore Roosevelt is completing Joint Task Force Exercises with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). U.S. Navy Photo(RELEASED)

America demonstrates invincibly one thing that I had doubted up to now: that the middle classes can govern a State. ... Despite their small passions, their incomplete education, their vulgar habits, they can obviously provide a practical sort of intelligence and that turns out to be enough.
—Alexis de Tocqueville

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Saturday, July 29, 2006
Alexis de Tocqueville was born in Paris on this day in 1805. He died April 16, 1859 in Cannes.
See also: The Alexis de Tocqueville Tour Exploring Democracy in America

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July 13, 2006

Difficult Moments

Each difficult moment has the potential to open my eyes and open my heart.
—Myla Kabat-Zinn

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, July 11, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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July 10, 2006

Get Meaning into Your Life, Redux

So many people walk around with a meaningless life. They seem half asleep, even when they're busy doing things they think are important. This is because they're chasing the wrong things.
The way you get meaning into your life is to devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to the community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.
—Morrie Schwartz

Source: Tuesdays with Morrie: an Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom 1st ed. 1997 by Doubleday ISBN: 0-385-48451-8
Secondary source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, July 8/9, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also:
Consider This' shorter version of Get Meaning into Year Life, published exactly a year ago!
FastCompany.com's November 1999 article Work and Life - Morrie Schwartz

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July 4, 2006

July Fourth, 2006

These are times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.
—Thomas Paine

Source: BrainyQuote's Thomas Paine Quotations
See also:
Thomas Paine National Historical Association
view Wikipedia's Thomas Paine Biography

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July 2, 2006

Stevenson's Resolution

I have resolved from this day on,
I will do all the business I can honestly,
have all the fun I can reasonably,
do all the good I can do willingly,
and save my digestion by thinking pleasantly.
—Robert Louis Stevenson

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, July 1/2, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: The Literature Network's Robert Louis Stevenson - Biography and Works

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June 27, 2006

Freedom & Security: Related?

There is no inverse relationship between freedom and security. Less of one does not lead to more of the other. People with no rights are not safe from terrorist attack.
—Molly Ivins

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: Molly Ivins Columns at the Star-Telegram, Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas

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June 26, 2006

Flaming Quicksand Unwinnable War

Americans need to understand that Mr. Bush's invasion of Iraq was a strategic blunder of the highest magnitude. It has resulted in mind-boggling levels of bloodshed, chaos and misery in Iraq, and it certainly hasn't made the U.S. any safer.

We've had enough clownish debates on the Senate floor and elsewhere. We've had enough muscle-flexing in the White House and on Capitol Hill by guys who ran and hid when they were young and their country was at war. And it's time to stop using generals and their forces under fire in the field for cheap partisan political purposes.

The question that needs to be answered, honestly and urgently (and without regard to partisan politics), is how best to extricate overstretched American troops some of them serving their third or fourth tours from the flaming quicksand of an unwinnable war.
—Bob Herbert

Source: Bob Herbert's New York Times op-ed piece Playing Politics With Oraq, Monday, June 26, 2006 [requires registration & paid subscription]

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June 25, 2006

Judge Success

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at lectern, 1964

US Library of Congress

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. addresses the press 1964

Born:
January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia

Died:
April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee

We are prone to judge success by the index of our salaries or the size of our automobiles, rather than by the quality of our service relationship to humanity.
—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, June 20, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: Nobel Prize's Martin Luther King Biography

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June 20, 2006

Collaborate With Whom?

roadsign photo - collaborate

Seth Kahan 2006

Highway Collaboration

My dear brother and friend sent me this photo for our consideration! Seth is a Collaboration Specialist, Conference Keynote Speaker, and Executive Strategy Consultant. Visit www.sethkahan.com to learn more. Visit his blog: collaboratioNation.com

What all these stories tell me is that we are seeing the emergence of collaborative business models that were simply unimaginable a decade ago. Today, there are so many more tools, so many more ideas, so many more people able to put these ideas and tools together to discover new things, and so much better communications to disseminate these new ideas across the globe.

If more countries can get just a few basic things right enough telecom and bandwidth so their people can get connected; steadily improving education; decent, corruption-free economic governance; and the rule of law and we can find more sources of clean energy, there is every reason for optimism that we could see even faster global growth in this century, with many more people lifted out of poverty.
—Thomas L. Friedman: Outsourcing, Schmoutsourcing! Out Is Over New York Times, May 19, 2006

Source: Seth Kahan's blog, collaboratioNation.com 22 May 2006 entry.
See also Thomas L. Friedman: Outsourcing, Schmoutsourcing! Out Is Over New York Times, May 19, 2006 [requires registration & premium subscription]

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June 19, 2006

Can Anything Be Stupider?

Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
—Blaise Pascal

Source: BrainyQuote.com's Blasie Pascal Quotes
It's the birthday of mathematician and mystic Blaise Pascal, born in Clermont, France (1623).

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June 15, 2006

Nothing You Must Be

There is really nothing you must be.
And there is nothing you must do.
There is really nothing you must have.
And there is really nothing you must know.
There is really nothing you must become.
However. It helps to understand that fire burns, and when it rains, the earth gets wet...

'Whatever, there are consequences. Nobody is exempt,' said the master.
—Robert Fulghum

Source: It Was On Fire When I Lay Down On It by Robert Fulghum 1989 Villard Books ISBN 0-394-58056-7
See also: Robert Fulghum's Official Web site
See also: Marine Corps Heritage Foundation
This is my daughter Jennifer's 32nd birthday. I wish her love, peace, and courage. Happy birthday Jenn Marie!

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June 13, 2006

Among Substantial Things

Could we but give us wholly to the dreams,
And get into their world that to the sense
Is shadow, and not linger wretchedly
Among substantial things.
—William Butler Yeats, from his poem The Shadowy Waters, written in 1900

Source: W. B. Yeats Dead; Famous Irish Poet NY Times obituary January 30, 1939. Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland on this date, June 13, in 1865.
See also: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, June 13, 2006

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June 12, 2006

Can You Listen to Anything?

Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.
—Robert frost

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, June 10/11, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: The Academy of American Poets short Robert Frost bio.

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June 6, 2006

D-Day: June 6, 1944

www.DDay-Overlord.com

Assault Boats enroute Omaha & USS AUGUSTA

Omaha Beach, Normandy, June 6, 1944

But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.
—Abraham Lincoln.

Source: Modern History Sourcebook: Abraham Lincoln: Letter to Mrs. Bixby, 1864

On the night of June 5, 1944, 1,000 ships, the greatest armada ever to set sail, left the British isles, bound for the Coast of Normandy--its mission to liberate Europe. Operation Overlord had begun. On June 6, almost 200,000 Allied soldiers landed on rugged French beaches, code-named Omaha, Utah, Gold, Juno, and Sword. Rocky cliffs fortified by the German loomed over the beaches. This was the formidable threshold of the second front, the long-awaited campaign that spelled the end of the Third Reich. Stubborn German resistance and gale-force channel storms caused a devastating loss of men and equipment in the period immediately following the landing. Some American units suffered casualties to half their numbers. The invasion of Europe often seemed on the brink of foundering.

But it did not fail. The door to Europe was opened. American, British, and Canadian forces poured in, accompanied by contingents representing the governments-in-exile of Belgium, Czechoslovakia, France, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Norway, and Poland. In little more than two months Paris was liberated. Within a year Hitler was dead and the German Army defeated. Today, above Omaha Beach, the American Cemetery bears silent, but perpetual witness to the cost of the mightiest sea-to-shore operation ever launched.
—Naval Historical Center

Source: Naval Historical Center's Art Collection D-DAY, NORMANDY; Operation Overlord

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June 1, 2006

Ready to Learn

Personally, I'm always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.
—Winston S. Churchill

Source: Think Exist key word Learn quotes.

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May 28, 2006

Memorial Day, May 2006

Dick Wersinger 1944 photo

Source: Wersinger Family Archives

DIck Wersinger: 1944 World War II in the Pacific

My Dad, Dick Wersinger, sent this photo from somewhere in the Pacific Theater to his then fiancee, Minna, in Sydney, Australia. Dad survived the war and Minna emigrated to the US in 1946. They were happily married from November 1946 until February 1992 when he passed on.

IN FLANDERS FIELDS the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
—Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918) Canadian Army

Source: From his poem In Flanders Field on a Web site (unofficial) devoted to Arlington Cemetery
See also the official Arlington National Cemetery Web site.

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May 25, 2006

Meek Young Men: Think!

Meek young men grow up in libraries, believing it their duty to accept the views, which Cicero, which Locke, which Bacon, have given, forgetful that Cicero, Locke, and Bacon were only young men in libraries, when they wrote those books.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, May 25, 2006
It is the birthday of Ralph Waldo Emerson who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, USA in 1803.
Books by Emerson

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May 23, 2006

No Calling More Demanding

No calling in our society is more demanding than teaching; no calling in our society is more selfless than teaching; and no calling is more central to the vitality of a democracy than teaching.
—Roger Mudd

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, May 18, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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May 17, 2006

One Single Good Action

A teacher who can arouse a feeling for one good action, for one single good poem, accomplishes more than he who fills our memory with rows and rows of natural objects, classified with name and form.
—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, May 13/14, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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May 15, 2006

America the Fearful

The Bushies will tell you that it is dangerous and even against the law to inquire into these nefarious activities. We just have to trust the king.

Well, I give you fair warning. This is a road map to totalitarianism. Hallmarks of totalitarian regimes have always included an excessive reliance on secrecy, the deliberate stoking of fear in the general population, a preference for military rather than diplomatic solutions in foreign policy, the promotion of blind patriotism, the denial of human rights, the curtailment of the rule of law, hostility to a free press and the systematic invasion of the privacy of ordinary people.

There are not enough pretty words in all the world to cover up the damage that George W. Bush has done to his country. If the United States could look at itself in a mirror, it would be both alarmed and ashamed at what it saw.
—Bob Herbert

Source: Bob Herbert column America the Fearful [requires registration & subsription] published in the New York Times on Monday, May 15, 2006

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May 2, 2006

Shared Humanness: Prime Importance

Regardless of race, creed, ideology, political bloc (East and West), or economic region (North and South), the most important and basic aspect of all people is their shared humanity—the fact that each person, old, young, rich, poor, educated, uneducated, male, or female, is a human. This shared humanness and thus the shared aspiration of gaining happiness and avoid suffering as well as the basic right to bring these about are of prime importance.
—atributed to His Holiness, the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday, April 22/23, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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April 30, 2006

Love Thrives When Manipulation Stops

Love comes when manipulation stops; when you think more about the other person than about his or her reactions to you. When you dare to reveal yourself fully. When you dare to be vulnerable.
—Dr. Joyce Brothers

Source: QuotationBooks.com's Dr. Joyce Brothers Quotation

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April 28, 2006

Sometimes Silence Impresses

Sometimes one creates a dynamic impression by saying something, and sometimes one creates as significant an impression by remaining silent.
—atributed to His Holiness, the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Wednesday, April 26, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

Posted by niganit at 6:38 AM | Comments (0)
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April 26, 2006

Longings Are Universal

That is part of the beauty of all literature. You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you're not lonely and isolated from anyone.
You belong.
—F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1896—1940 American novelist

Source: The Ultimate Pocket Positives: A Second Anthology of Inspirational Thoughts Compiled by Maggie Pinkey. The Five Mile Press 2001 Reprinted 2002 ISBN = 1 86503 579 3

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April 25, 2006

Bush's 1,000 Days

The Hundred Days is indelibly associated with Franklin D. Roosevelt, and the Thousand Days with John F. Kennedy. But as of this week, a thousand days remain of President Bush's last term -- days filled with ominous preparations for and dark rumors of a preventive war against Iran.

The issue of preventive war as a presidential prerogative is hardly new. In February 1848 Rep. Abraham Lincoln explained his opposition to the Mexican War: "Allow the President to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such purpose -- and you allow him to make war at pleasure [emphasis added]. . . . If, today, he should choose to say he thinks it necessary to invade Canada to prevent the British from invading us, how could you stop him? You may say to him, 'I see no probability of the British invading us'; but he will say to you, 'Be silent; I see it, if you don't.'"
—Arthur Schlesinger Jr.

Source: Arthur Schlesinger Jr.'s OP-ED Bush's 1,000 Days published April 24, 2006 in The Washington Post

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April 24, 2006

Presidents and Politicians Worry

Presidents and politicians may worry about losing face, or votes, or legacy; it is time to think about young Americans and innocent civilians who are losing their lives.
—John Kerry, US Senator, Massachusetts (D)

Source: Senator John Kerry's speech "Dissent" given in Faneuil Hall April 22, 2006, Boston, Massachusetts.

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April 14, 2006

April 14, 2006 and April 14, 1865

The Martyr of liberty, Lincoln assassinated circa 1865 print

Library of Congress,
Stern Collection, Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

The Martyr of liberty...

An example of the many popular images printed after the assassination that depict the attack on President Lincoln. This one includes an adaptation of a quote from Macbeth, Lincoln's favorite Shakespeare play.

On the evening of April 14, 1865, while attending a special performance of the comedy, "Our American Cousin," President Abraham Lincoln was shot. Accompanying him at Ford's Theater that night were his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, a twenty-eight year-old officer named Major Henry R. Rathbone, and Rathbone's fiancee, Clara Harris. After the play was in progress, a figure with a drawn derringer pistol stepped into the presidential box, aimed, and fired. The president slumped forward.

The assassin, John Wilkes Booth, dropped the pistol and waved a dagger. Rathbone lunged at him, and though slashed in the arm, forced the killer to the railing. Booth leapt from the balcony and caught the spur of his left boot on a flag draped over the rail, and shattered a bone in his leg on landing. Though injured, he rushed out the back door, and disappeared into the night on horseback.

A doctor in the audience immediately went upstairs to the box. The bullet had entered through Lincoln's left ear and lodged behind his right eye. He was paralyzed and barely breathing. He was carried across Tenth Street, to a boarding-house opposite the theater, but the doctors' best efforts failed. Nine hours later, at 7:22 AM on April 15th, Lincoln died.
—US Library of Congress

Source: US Library of Congress: Lincoln Papers:Lincoln Assasination: Introduction

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April 4, 2006

Test a Man's Character

Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power.
—Abraham Lincoln

Source: March 22rd entry: Office Perpetual Calendar by Judy Johannesen, Haymarket, Virginia

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April 3, 2006

Unsolvable Problems

We are continually faced with great opportunities, which are brilliantly disguised as unsolvable problems.
—Margaret Mead

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, March 30, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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April 2, 2006

Not Enough to be Compassionate

It is not enough to be compassionate. You must act. There two aspects to action. One is to overcome the distortions and afflictions of your mind, that is, in terms of calming and eventualy dispelling anger. This is action out of compassion. The other is more social, more public. When something needs to be done in the world to rectify wrongs, if one is really concerned with benefiting others, one needs to be engaged, involved.
—atributed to His Holiness, the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday, April 1/2, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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March 31, 2006

Horror of Iraq

The fate of the entire U.S. enterprise in Iraq now hangs in the balance, as the war has entered a dangerous new phase. It is the phase of barbaric identity-card violence between Sunnis and Shiites. In the late 1970's, I covered a similar moment in Lebanon, and the one thing I learned was this: Once this kind of venom gets unleashed with members of each community literally beheading each other on the basis of their religious identities it poisons everything. You enter a realm that is beyond politics, a realm where fear and revenge dominate everyone's thinking and that is where Iraq is heading.  . . .
It is five minutes to midnight
—Thomas L. Friedman

Source: Thomas L. Friedman's New York Times Op-Ed Iraq at the 11th Hour Thursday, March 31, 2006.

This is the 24th birthday of my son, Nicholas Gerard. He was born in Houston, Texas on this day in 1982 and died the next day, April 1, 1982. I miss you so, my dear Nick, and in the arms of the angels, may you find some comfort there.
—Love, Dad

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March 29, 2006

Your Own Resolution

Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other one thing.
—Abraham Lincoln

Source: Abraham Lincoln quotes on www.PresidentLincoln.com

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March 26, 2006

Keep a Good Heart

Keep a good heart. That's the most important thing in life. It's not how much money you make or what you can acquire. The art of it is to keep a good heart.
—Joni Mitchell

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, March 21, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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March 23, 2006

Tears Over Answered Prayers

More tears are shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones.
—Truman Capote; an epigraph he chose for his last, unfinished work

Source: from the motion picture Capote

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March 18, 2006

Education: A Definition

Education:
the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty.
—Mark Twain

Source: The Little Book of Humorous Quotation edited by Alison Bullivant 2004 Barnes & Noble Books ISBN 0-7607-3776-2

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March 14, 2006

Our Finest Moments

The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled. For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.
—M. Scott Peck

Source: Thinkexist.com's M. Scott Peck Quotes
See also: M. Scott Peck's biography on his "official" M. Scot Peck Web site

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March 10, 2006

Do Not Believe (Revisited)

Do not believe what you have heard.
Do not believe in tradition because it is handed down many generations.
Do not believe in anything that has been spoken of many times.
Do not believe because the written statements come from some old sage.
Do not believe in conjecture.
Do not believe in authority or teachers or elders.
But after careful observation and analysis, when it agrees with reason and it will benefit one and all, then accept it and live by it.
---Buddha (563 B.C. -- 483 B.C.)

Source: Wisdom of the Ages: A Modern Master Brings Eternal Truth into Everyday Life by Wayne W. Dyer ISBN: 0-06-019231-3
Today is MY birthday. Thank you, Mom and Dad, for giving me life, and for being such wonderful, honest parents
This entry was originally posted on April 28, 2004 and has such deep and profound meaning to me that I thought it was altogether proper to repost here.

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March 7, 2006

Busy About?

It is not enough to be busy—
So are the ants.
The question is:
What are we busy about?
—Henry David Thoreau

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March 6, 2006

Help Another and Help Oneself

It is one of the most beautiful compensations of life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, March 4/5, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (Online)

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March 4, 2006

Men Learn

Men learn when they teach.
—Seneca

Source: March 3rd entry: Office Perpetual Calendar by Judy Johannesen, Haymarket, Virginia

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March 2, 2006

Last of Human Freedoms

The last of the human freedoms—,
to choose one's attitudes in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way.
—Viktor Frankl

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2
See also:
Viktor Frankl Institut's Viktor Frankl: Life and Work
Memorial for Peter McWilliams, 1950—2000

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March 1, 2006

Flowing Beards Are All the Go

And now while round the shearing floor the listning shearers gape,
He tells the story oer and oer, and brags of his escape.
Them barber chaps what keeps a tote, By George, Ive had enough,
One tried to cut my bloomin throat, but thank the Lord its tough.
And whether hes believed or no, theres one thing to remark,
That flowing beards are all the go way up in Ironbark.
—A.B. "Banjo" Paterson from The Man From Ironbark

Source: THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER AND OTHER VERSES e-text online by OzLit@Vicnet
The poem was first published in The Bulletin (a weekly published in Sydney, Australia) on Dec. 17, 1892.

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February 28, 2006

It Just Might Work

It struck me that the movies had spent more than half a century saying, They lived happily ever after and the following quarter-century warning that they'll be lucky to make it through the weekend. Possibly now we are now entering a third era in which the movies will be sounding a note of cautious optimism: You know it just might work.
—Nora Ephron

Source: Nora Ephrn Quotes on Quotationsbook.com

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February 27, 2006

Act of Kindness

The smallest act of kindness is worth more than the greatest intention.
—Kahlil Gibran

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, February 25/26, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: Gibran Kahlil Gibran - Biography and Works

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February 26, 2006

Visual Learning

You can observe a lot just by watching.
—Yogi Berra

Source: quoted in Learn More Now: 10 Simple Steps to Learning Better, Smarter, and Faster by Marcia Conner
See also:
marciaconner.com
Ageless Learner: Curious for Life
Baseball Library's Yogi Berra

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February 22, 2006

The Illiterate of the 21st Century

The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.
—Alvin Toffler

Source: quoted in Learn More Now: 10 Simple Steps to Learning Better, Smarter, and Faster by Marcia Conner
See also:
marciaconner.com
Ageless Learner: Curious for Life
Alvin Toffler on Wikipedia
Toffler Associates

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February 15, 2006

Boldness Has Genius

What ever you can do,
or dream you can, begin it.
Boldness has genius,
power and magic in it.
—Johann von Goethe

Source: The Portable Life 101: 179 essential lessons from the New York Times bestseller Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned in Life In School—But Didn't by Peter McWilliams 1995 ISBN: 0-931580-41-2
See also:
Roots.com's Goethe Biography
Memorial for Peter McWilliams, 1950—2000

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February 14, 2006

Other Life Gives Life Meaning

If you were all alone in the universe with no one to talk to, no one with which to share the beauty of the stars, to laugh with, to touch, what would be your purpose in life? It is other life, it is love, which gives your life meaning. This is harmony. We must discover the joy of each other, the joy of challenge, the joy of growth.
—Mitsugi Saotome

I AM because I am love; I AM because I love.
Happy Valentine's, my Love, Carol Ruth, and all in my life who truly love me. I am full of joy and gratitude for your love. I am a more complete man because I love and I am loved.

Source: Wisdom.com's Love Quotes | Love Quotations category
See also: Wikipedia's Mitsugi Saotome biography

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February 5, 2006

Stroke of Luck

ranphotoddg91sydney

Royal Australian Navy photo by Able Seaman Paul Berry

Sydney, Australia (Jan. 30, 2006) – USS PINCKNEY (DDG 91) and the World Famous Sydney Opera House

The guided missile destroyer USS PINCKNEY (DDG 91) transits pass the World Famous Sydney Opera House as she made a scheduled port visit to Sydney.

PINCKNEY was participating in the Pacific 2006 International Maritime Exposition at Sydneys Exhibition Centre. This was a major international event that showcased the latest in maritime and naval technology from throughout the world.

Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.
—attributed to His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Friday, January 27, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

 

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February 3, 2006

To Listen Fully

To listen fully means to pay close attention to what is being said beneath the words. You listen not only to the "music," but to the essence of the person speaking. You listen not only for what someone knows, but for what he or she is.
—Peter Senge

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Thursday, February 2, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: What is Enlightenment?'s online article Peter Senge: Bigraphy and Resources

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February 1, 2006

Done With Great Things

I am done with great things and big plans, great institutions and big success. I am for those tiny, invisible lovinghumna forces that work from individual to individual, creeping through the crannies of the world like so many rootlets, or like the capillary oozing of water, which, if given time, will rend the hardest monuments of pride.
—William James

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Tuesday, January 31, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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January 31, 2006

Presidential Criticism

The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.
—Theodore Roosevelt, Editorial in the newspaper Kansas City Star, May 7, 1918

Source: Quotations of Theodore Roosevelt by The Theodore Roosevelt Organization.

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January 27, 2006

Love: The Soul of Genius

Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together make genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius.
—Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Source: Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac for Friday, January 27, 2006
It is the 250th Anniversary of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's birth, born in Salzburg, Austria in 1756, he died December 5th 1791 in Vienna, Austria.
See also: The Mozart Project

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January 25, 2006

Sex and Love

Sex without love is an empty experience, but, as empty experiences go, it's one of the best.
—Woody Allen

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8

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January 21, 2006

THE Three Rs

Follow the three Rs:

Respect for self
Respect for others

Responsibility for all your actions
—attrributed to his Holiness the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Friday, January 20, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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January 20, 2006

Understanding Heart in a Teacher

An understanding heart is everything in a teacher, and cannot be esteemed highly enough. One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feeling. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child
—Carl Jung

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, December 31, 2005 / January 1, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6

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January 19, 2006

Nevermore Said the Raven!

"Be that word our sign in parting, bird or fiend," I shrieked, upstarting-
"Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken!- quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!"
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamplight o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted- nevermore!
—Edgar Allan Poe The Raven

Source: Selected Works, The Raven at the Poemuseum.org
It is the birthday of Edgar Allan Poe, born January 19, 1809 in Boston, MA, and died on October 7, 1849 in Baltimore, MD.

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January 15, 2006

Weakness of Violence

The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral, begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it. Through violence you may murder the liar, but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth. Through violence you may murder the hater, but you do not murder hate. In fact, violence merely increases hate. So it goes. Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that. Hate multiplies hate, violence multiplies violence, and toughness multiplies toughness in a descending spiral of destruction.... The chain reaction of evil - hate begetting hate, wars producing more wars - must be broken, or we shall be plunged into the dark abyss of annihilation.
—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from Strength to Love (1963)

Source: Martin Luther King, Jr. - Wikiquote
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. born January 15, 1929, died April 4, 1968

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January 13, 2006

Answer in Your Hands

A young man caught a small bird, and held it behind his back. He then asked, "Master, is the bird I hold in my hands alive or dead?" The boy thought this was a grand opportunity to play a trick on the old man. If the master answered "dead," it would be let loose into the air. If the master answered "alive," he would simply wring its neck. The master spoke, "The answer is in your hands."
—attrributed to his Holiness the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar Wednesday, January 11, 2006
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

January 11, 2006

Theft From Those Who Hunger

Every gun that is made, every warship ever launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and not clothed.
—Dwight D Eisenhower

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: Dwight D. Eisenhower, The Chance for Peace speech, April 16, 1953 Washington, D.C. Social Justice Speeches Project of the Edchange.com Multicultural Education Pavilion

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January 9, 2006

Making It Meaningful

Old friends pass away,. new friends appear. It is just like the days. An old day passes, a new day arrives. The important thing is to make it meaningful: a meaningful friend—or a meaningful day.
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar, Thursday, January 6th 2006 entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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January 7, 2006

Religion: Very Simple

My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Insight from the Dalai Lama Daily Calendar, Wednesday, January 4th 2006 entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

January 6, 2006

Americans: Free or Slave

The time is near at hand which must determine whether Americans are to be free men or slaves.
—George Washington

Source: BrainyQuote's George Washington Quotes
See also" Whitehouse.gov's Biography of George Washington
I just finished reading David McCullough's 1776 Simon & Schuster 2005 ISBN: 0743226712.
See 1776 at Powell's Books

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January 5, 2006

Insanity: A Definition

Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, and expecting different results.
—Albert Einstein

Source: The Best Liberal Quotes Ever: Why the Left is Right by Wlliam Martin. Sourcebooks, Inc. 2004 ISBN: 1-4022-0309-8
See also: Nobel Foundation's The Nobel Prize in Physics 1921 Albert Einstein — Biography

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January 2, 2006

Knowledge and Wisdom

Abundance of knowledge does not teach men to be wise.
—Heraclitus

Source: Teachers: Jokes, Quotes, and Anecdotes Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, December 31, 2005 / January 1, 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing ISBN: 0-7407-5200-6
See also: Trinity College's The Window: Philosphy on the Internet:Heraclitus of Ephesus: Greek Philospher
[Trinity College, Hartford, CT, USA]

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December 31, 2005

Finish Each Day

Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could; some blunders and absurdities have crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, Saturday/Sunday, December 31, 2005 / January 1, 2006
A Blessed and Happy New Year to All

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December 30, 2005

Teachers' Vulnerabilty

Teaching is a daily exercise in vulnerabilty.
—Parker Palmer

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, Thursday, December 29, 2005 entry
See also: explorefaith.org's Parker J. Palmer biographical sketch

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December 29, 2005

Honest and Courageous

Portrait of Andrew Johnson

Photo: White House.gov

Andrew Johnson: 17th President of the United States

Suffice it to say that he was honest and courageous as ever. Whatever else may be said of him, his integrity and courage have been seldom questioned though often proved. He was by nature and temperament squarely disposed toward justice and the right, and was a determined warrior for his convictions. He erred from limitation of grasp and perception, perhaps, or through sore perplexity in trying times, but never weakly or consciously. He was always headstrong and "sure he was right" even in his errors.
—President Andrew Johnson's Obituary, New York Times, August 1, 1875

Source: New York Times On This Day: Birthdays: Dec. 29: Andrew Johnson Obituary
Andrew Johnson, 17th President of the United States, born: December 29, 1808 in Raleigh, North Carolina and died: July 31, 1875 in Carter's Station, Tennessee.
See also the White House.gov's Biography of Andrew Johnson

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December 28, 2005

What Miracle is Wrought

When we do the best we can, we never know what miracle is wrought in our life, or in the life of another.
—Helen Keller

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Saturday/Sunday, December 24/25, 2005 entry

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December 27, 2005

Excitement: A Secret of Success

The real secret of success is enthusiasm. Yes, more than enthusiasm, I would say excitement. I like toi see men get excited. When they get excited they make a success of their lives.
—Walter Chrysler

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Tuesday, December 20, 2005 entry
See also: Chrysler Museum of Art's Biography of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

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December 26, 2005

In the Direction of Dreams

I have learned this at least in my experiement: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with success unexpected in common hours.
—Henry David Thoreau

Source: Teachers Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, December 24/25, 2005
See also: Literature Network's Biography of Henry David Thoreau

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December 18, 2005

Happy Birthday, Steven Spielberg

US Navy photo CVN-74 underway Pacific Ocean

US Navy photo PHAN Leah Gaines

A Fine Navy Day? STENNIS (CVN-74) Underway ASTERN!

(Dec. 14, 2005) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS JOHN C. STENNIS (CVN 74) steams Full Astern during a scheduled maneuver designed to test the ships rudders. STENNIS is undergoing sea trials in the Pacific Ocean after an 11-month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. Go snipes, and it's great this maneuver was completed during daylight. These evolutions almost always are conducted in the wee small hours of the morning!

It's the birthday [December 18th]of the filmmaker Steven Spielberg, born in Cincinnati, Ohio (1946). His parents had a difficult marriage and eventually got separated. Spielberg escaped from all the tension in the house by making amateur movies with his father's super-8 camera. He made two movies about World War II, and a movie about a UFO invasion, starring his sisters as victims. His mother helped with special effects. He got a local movie house to show one of his films when he was eighteen, and he made $500 in one night.

Though he applied twice to the film program at the University of Southern California, he didn't get in, and he ended up going for a degree in English from California State University at Long Beach. One day, he was taking a tour of Universal Studios when he slipped by security, found an abandoned janitors' closet, cleaned it up, and turned it into an office. He discovered that if he wore a suit and tie he could walk right past the security guards at the front gate, and he began coming in to his office every day. He made a short silent movie that caught the attention of some executives, and that got him a contract to make TV movies. He was only twenty-one years old.

Spielberg's first feature length movie The Sugarland Express (1974) got good reviews, but it was a box office disappointment. For his next project, he started working on a movie about a seaside town being terrorized by a man-eating shark. It was an incredibly difficult movie to make. The robot shark they used kept breaking down. They had to shoot almost half the movie on a boat. They went over schedule and over budget. The producers of the film had worried about hiring such a young director, and their fears seemed to be coming true. As the work on the film dragged on and on, Spielberg began to worry that his career as a filmmaker might be over.

But when it finally came out in 1975, Jaws made more money than any other movie had ever made up to that point in history. It's often been called the first blockbuster, because it was the first summer movie that teenagers went back to see again and again throughout the whole summer that it was released. Ever since Jaws, Hollywood studios have been releasing action packed movies every summer, trying to duplicate Spielberg's success.

Seven years later, Spielberg topped the success of Jaws with his movie, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982) about a young boy who's recovering from the breakup of his parents' marriage when he befriends an alien that has been left behind by his spaceship. Spielberg has called E.T. his most personal movie. He said, "It's about how I felt when my parents broke up... I responded by escaping into my imagination to shut down all my nerve endings... I dreamed about going to space or having space come to me."

Today Steven Spielberg is arguably one of the most popular entertainers in history. Three of his movies are among the top ten highest grossing films of all time.
—Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Sunday, Dec. 18, 2005

Source: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Sunday, Dec. 18, 2005
See also: All Movide Guide: Steven Spielberg

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December 16, 2005

Fragile Shoot Grows Brave

Courage is sometimes frail as hope is frail: a fragile shoot between two stones grows brave toward the sun though warmth and brightness fail, striving and faith the only strength it knows.
—Frances Rodman

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Monday, December 14, 2005 entry

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December 15, 2005

Success is About Relationships

Success is not about money and power. Real success is about relationships. There's no point in making $50 million a year if your teenager thinks you're a jerk and you spend no time with your wife.
—Christopher Reeve, 1952—2004 American screen actor

Source: The Ultimate Pocket Positives: A Second Anthology of Inspirational Thoughts Compiled by Maggie Pinkey. The Five Mile Press 2001 Reprinted 2002 ISBN = 1 86503 579 3
See also Wikipedia: Christopher Reeve

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December 14, 2005

Country Really Free?

The most certain test by which we can judge whether a country is truly free is the amount of security enjoyed by minorities.
—Lord Acton (John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton), historian (1834-1902)

Source: Counter-top at the Java House: 210 W. Evergreen, Vancouver, WA 98660, 360.737.2925. A very friendly and pleasant coffee house in downtown Vancouver, Washington. And they have free Wi-Fi! Thanks so much!

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December 7, 2005

Remember Pearl Harbor, 07 DEC 1941

USS MILLER FF-1091 photo

Destroyers Online USS Miller (FF-1091)

USS MILLER (FF-1091) named in honor of Dorie Miller

MILLER, a KNOX Class Frigate (FF), was originally commissioned June 30, 1973 as a Destroyer Escort (DE). These ships were redesignated as Frigates (FF) in June 1975, but retained their original hull numbers. US Navy destroyers, frigates, and destroyer escort are traditionally named in honor of Navy and Marine Corps combat heroes. MILLER justly honored the memory of Ship's Cook Third Class Doris Miller, USN. The ship proudly served our US Navy until decommissioning October 15, 1991. I served in USS CAPODANNO (FF-1093) and USS BAGLEY (FF-1069), both sister ships to MILLER.

It wasn't hard. I just pulled the trigger and she worked fine. I had watched the others with these guns. I guess I fired her for about fifteen minutes. I think I got one of those Jap planes. They were diving pretty close to us.
—Ship's Cook, Third Class Doris (Dorie) Miller, USN aboard USS WEST VIRGINIA (BB-48) describing his firing the machine gun during the battle, a weapon which he had not been trained to operate.

He was serving in that battleship when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. Miller had arisen at 6 a.m., and was collecting laundry when the alarm for general quarters sounded. He headed for his battle station, the antiaircraft battery magazine amidship, only to discover that torpedo damage had wrecked it, so he went on deck. Because of his physical prowess, he was assigned to carry wounded fellow Sailors to places of greater safety. Then an officer ordered him to the bridge to aid the mortally wounded Captain of the ship. He subsequently manned a 50 caliber Browning anti-aircraft machine gun until he ran out of ammunition and was ordered to abandon ship.

Miller was commended by the Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox on 1 April 1942, and on 27 May 1942 he received the Navy Cross, which Fleet Admiral (then Admiral) Chester W. Nimitz, the Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet personally presented to Miller on board aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) for his extraordinary courage in battle. Speaking of Miller, Nimitz remarked:

"This marks the first time in this conflict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacific Fleet to a member of his race and I'm sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts."

On 13 December 1941, Miller reported to USS Indianapolis (CA-35), and subsequently returned to the west coast of the United States in November 1942. Assigned to the newly constructed USS Liscome Bay (CVE-56) in the spring of 1943, Miller was on board that escort carrier during Operation Galvanic, the seizure of Makin and Tarawa Atolls in the Gilbert Islands. Liscome Bay's aircraft supported operations ashore between 20-23 November 1943. At 5:10 a.m. on 24 November, while cruising near Butaritari Island, a single torpedo from Japanese submarine I-175 struck the escort carrier near the stern. The aircraft bomb magazine detonated a few moments later, sinking the warship within minutes. Listed as missing following the loss of that escort carrier, Miller was officially presumed dead 25 November 1944, a year and a day after the loss of Liscome Bay. Only 272 Sailors survived the sinking of Liscome Bay, while 646 died.

In addition to the Navy Cross, Miller was entitled to the Purple Heart Medal; the American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp; the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal; and the World War II Victory Medal.

Source: US Naval Historical Center's Ship's Cook Third Class Doris Miller, USN
See also:
1. Consider this one year ago: December 7, 2004
2. www.dorismiller.com

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December 6, 2005

Sail Away From Safe Harbor

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didnt do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
—Mark Twain

See The Mark Twain House and Museum Biography

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November 30, 2005

Keep Swinging, Keep Swinging

My motto was always to keep swinging. Whether I was in a slump or feeling badly or having trouble off the field, the only thing to do was keep swinging.
—Hank Aaron

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November 29, 2005

Men and Women Doing New Things

The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done; men and women who are creative, inventive, and discoverers, who can be critical and verify, and not accept, everything they are offered.
—Jean Piaget

Source: Teachers Daily calendar Saturday/Sunday, November 26/27, 2005
See also: Jean Piaget Society

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November 23, 2005

Education: Not to Amuse Students!

Education is not to reform students or amuse them or to make them expert technicians. It is to unsettle their minds, widen their horizons, inflame their intellects, teach them to think straight, if possible.
—Robert M. Hutchins

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Tuesday, November 22, 2005

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November 22, 2005

Men Who Question Power

JFK close-up photo Cronkite interview Sep. 2, 1963

NARA: ARC Identifier: 194259,

President interviewed by Walter Cronkite

President Kennedy ( close-up ). Hyannisport, MA, Squaw Island., 09/02/1963

The men who create power make an indispensable contribution to the Nations greatness, but the men who question power make a contribution just as indispensable, especially when that questioning is disinterested, for they determine whether we use power or power uses us.
—John F. Kennedy: Amherst College, Oct 26, 1963 - Source JFK Library, Boston, Mass.

Source: John F. Kennedy Quotations - the Quotation Pages

The President is shot
On November 21, 1963, President Kennedy flew to Texas to give several political speeches. The next day [November 22, 1963], as his car drove slowly past cheering crowds in Dallas, shots rang out. Kennedy was seriously wounded and died a short time later. Within a few hours of the shooting, police arrested Lee Harvey Oswald and charged him with the murder. On November 24, another man, Jack Ruby, shot and killed Oswald, thus silencing the only person who could have offered more information about this tragic event. The Warren Commission was organized to investigate the assassination and to clarify the many questions which remained.

Source: A Biography of John Fitzgerald Kennedy on the The John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library
See also: The National Archives - JFK Assassination Records Collection

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November 19, 2005

Path of American Destiny

Always the path of American destiny has been into the unknown. Always there arose enough reserves of strength, balances of sanity, portions of wisdom to carry the nation through to a fresh start with ever-reaching vitality.
—Carl Sandburg, speaking at the 96th (1959) Anniversary of Lincoln's Address at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, November 19, 1863.

Source: November 19th entry: Office Perpetual Calendar by Judy Johannesen, Haymarket, Virginia
Read Lincoln's Gettysburg Address on this blog, Consider This.

Only known photo of Lincoln at Gettysburg, PA 19 NOV 1863

Elizabeth L. Hill, Chief, Still Picture Branch,
U.S. National Archives

Only Known Photo of Lincoln at Gettysburg, PA

Only known photograph of President Abraham Lincoln at the dedication of the Military Cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania November 19, 1863. See the US Library of Congress Exhibition Gettysburg Address.

The above is actually a cropped portion of a larger photo of the President on the platform to see the President in the context of the moment.

It was on this day in 1863 that President Abraham Lincoln got up in front of about 15,000 people seated at a new national cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania and delivered the Gettysburg Address. The Battle of Gettysburg was a turning point in the Civil War. It was the furthest the Confederate soldiers had ever pushed into the North, but they'd been driven back.

The men killed in the battle had been buried hastily in shallow graves with haphazard wooden markers, but in the months since the battle, a man named David Wills oversaw the task of identifying and burying the dead properly. The ceremony was to dedicate the new cemetery. Wills invited the most popular poets of the day to write something in honor of the occasion. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier and William Cunnings Bryant all declined. So David Wills invited Edward Everett, a well-known speaker who was famous for his speeches about battlefields. It was almost as an afterthought that Wills decided to invite President Lincoln to the ceremony.

No one is sure exactly when Lincoln wrote his speech. Most people who knew him said that he spent a great deal of time writing every public statement he ever made, so he probably composed the first draft in Washington D.C. Witnesses said they saw him working on the speech on the train ride to Pennsylvania, and others said that they saw him working in his room the night before the event.

It was a foggy, cold morning on this day in 1863. Lincoln arrived about 10 a.m. Around noon the sun broke out as the crowds gathered on a hill overlooking the battlefield. A military band played, a local preacher offered a long prayer, and the headlining orator Edward Everett spoke for over two hours, describing the Battle of Gettysburg in great detail, and he brought the audience to tears more than once.

When Everett was finished, Lincoln got up, and pulled his speech from his coat pocket. It consisted of ten sentences, a total of 272 words. Lincoln did not mention any of the specifics of the war or any of the details of the battle of Gettysburg. He did not mention the North or the South. He did not mention slavery. Instead, he explained, in ordinary language, that our nation was founded on the idea that all men are created equal, and that we must continue to fight for that principle, in honor of those who have died fighting for it.

Unfortunately for Lincoln, the audience was distracted by a photographer setting up his camera, and by the time Lincoln had finished his speech and sat down the audience didn't even realize he had spoken. Lincoln was disappointed in his performance, but the next day Edward Everett told the President, "I wish that I could flatter myself that I had come as near to the central idea of the occasion in two hours as you did in two minutes." The speech was reprinted in newspapers around the country, and it went on to become one of the most famous speeches in American history.

It begins, "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal."

And ends, "Government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."
—Garrison Keillor: The Writer's Almanac for Saturday, November 19, 2005

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November 17, 2005

Do What You Have to DO

You can do what you have to do, and sometimes you can do it better than you think you can.
—Jimmy Carter

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Monday, November 14, 2005 entry

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November 11, 2005

Owed by So Many to So Few

USS Chaffee DDG 90 photo

US Navy: JO3 Ryan C. McGinley

USS CHAFEE (DDG 90) Returns to Pearl

On (Nov. 9, 2005) crew man the rails aboard the guided missile destroyer USS Chafee (DDG 90) as she returns to Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Chafee returned to Pearl Harbor after a regularly scheduled deployment as part of the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

I helped build these Arleigh Burke Class DDGs

Today is Veterans Day, honoring Americans who have served in the armed forces.

November 11 was originally called Armistice Day because it was on this day in 1918 that the First World War came to an end. The armistice was signed at 11:00 AM, on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of the year. After four years of brutal trench fighting, nine million soldiers had died and 21 million were wounded. It was called "The War to End All Wars," because it was the bloodiest war in history up to that point, and it made many people so sick of war that they hoped no war would ever break out again.

Many intellectuals and artists were disillusioned by the war. The philosopher Bertrand Russell said, "All this madness, all this rage, all this flaming death of our civilization and our hopes, has been brought about because a set of official gentlemen, living luxurious lives, mostly stupid, and all without imagination or heart, have chosen that it should occur rather than that any one of them should suffer some infinitesimal rebuff to his country's pride."
—Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Friday, Nov. 11, 2005

B-17s in Flight WW2 photo

Bob's B-17 Page

My Father-in-Low, Earl, served with the 8th Air Force in WW2

Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.
—Winston Churchill of Britain's fighter pilots during the Battle of Britain, 1940

Source: BBC History: Battle of Britain

LCVPs Lingayen Gulf, 09 JAN 1945 photo

The History Place.com | Pacific War

Lingayen Gulf, January 9, 1945

Landing barges sweep through the waters of Lingayen Gulf carrying the first wave of invaders to the beaches of Luzon following a naval bombardment of Japanese shore positions.

My Dad, Richard C., serving with the US Army's 612 Port Company, was here on this day in the first or second wave ashore.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it as a final resting place for those who died here that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead who struggled here have hallowed it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us--that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.
---Abraham Lincoln November 19, 1863

Source: University of Oklahoma Law Center's U.S. Historical Documents Collection

USS Stribling (DD-867) photo

Joseph Rachel Destroyer Photo Archive

USS STRIBLING (DD-867) Enters Monaco, June 1972

I served in USS STRIBLING (DD-867) from August 1970 through July 1972 as Main Propulsion Assistant. I was aboard STRIB when this picture was taken. View another photo of STRIB, with "bone in her teeth."

Honor the Men and Women of our Armed Forces
I honor my Dad's service in the US Army in World War 2 in the Pacific. He was on New Guinea, the Phillipines, and Japan as part of the Occupation Forces. Dad was in the first or second waves to go ashore during the landings at Lingayen Gulf, January 9, 1945, during the invasion of Luzon.
I honored my Father-in-Law's service in the US Army in World War 2 in the European Theater. He served with the Eighth Air Force based in England.
I honor my Brother-in-Law, Bill, who served in the US Navy in USS CONSTELLATION during the Viet Nam War and the Cold War.
I honor all my other family members and friends I've known through the years, for their honorable service.
I honor all my shipmates of the many commands I served at sea and ashore in the US Navy from 1970 to my retirement in 1994 during the Viet Nam War and the Cold War.

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November 10, 2005

Strange Things in the Midnight Sun

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.
—Robert W. Service from his poem The Cremation of Sam McGee

Source: RobertWService - Poetry and Books - The Cremation of Sam McGee
This is the start (and finish) of one of my most favorite poems. I have a tradition of reciting this poem from heart around the campfire every year at the Men's Council of Greater Washington Annual Men's Gathering.

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November 8, 2005

Success Is?

Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm.
—Sir Winston Churchill

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Wednesday November 2, 2005 entry
See also: Sir Winston Churchill Bio on Wikipedia.org

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November 7, 2005

What Lies Within Us

What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Saturday/Sunday November 5/6, 2005 entry

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November 4, 2005

Dreams and Seeds

However vague they are, dreams have a way of concealing themselves and leave us no peace until they are translated into reality, like seeds germinating underground, sure to sprout in their search for the sunlight.
—Lin Tutang

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Friday November 4, 2005 entry
See also: Lin Yutang Bio on Wikipedia.org

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November 1, 2005

Babbage to Tennyson

US Navy photo EA-6B Prowler VAQ-135

US Navy photo PHAN Dominique V. Brown

An EA-6B Prowler of VAQ-135, Black Ravens

(Oct. 26, 2005) An EA-6B Prowler, assigned to the Black Ravens of Electronic Warfare Squadron One Three Five (VAQ-135), conducts a fly by during an air power demonstration rehearsal aboard USS NIMITZ (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is currently on a regularly scheduled deployment in the Pacific Ocean.

"Every minute dies a man, Every minute one is born;" I need hardly point out to you that this calculation would tend to keep the sum total of the world's population in a state of perpetual equipoise, whereas it is a well-known fact that the said sum total is constantly on the increase. I would therefore take the liberty of suggesting that in the next edition of your excellent poem the erroneous calculation to which I refer should be corrected as follows: "Every moment dies a man, And one and a sixteenth is born." I may add that the exact figures are 1.067, but something must, of course, be conceded to the laws of metre.
—Charles Babbage, letter to Alfred, Lord Tennyson, about a couplet in his The Vision of Sin, 1842

Source: Math Quotes at the Quote Garden
See also: Charles Babbage short bio on Pioneers @ KerryR

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October 31, 2005

Hell-broth Boil and Bubble

Round about the cauldron go:
In the poisoned entrails throw.
Toad, that under cold stone
Days and nights has thirty-one
Sweltered venom sleeping got
Boil thou first i' th' charmed pot !

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and trouble.

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
Cool it with a baboon's blood.
Then the charm is firm and good.
—William Shakespeare from Macbeth

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Monday, October 31, 2005 Halloween
See also: Poem of the Week (PotW.org) Double, Double Toil and Trouble — Shakespeare

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October 24, 2005

Rosa Parks: Free, Free at Last

People always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn't true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some pople have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.
—Rosa Parks, reflecting upon her experience on that bus on December 1st, 1951 evening in Montgomery, Alabama.

Source: Washington Post, Oct. 24, 2005 article, Civil Rights Icon Dies at Age 92

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October 22, 2005

What Great Thing

What great thing would you attempt if you knew you could not fail?
—Dr. Robert H. Shuller

Source: Reaching for the Stars series window card, Comoendium, Inc.

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October 21, 2005

Opportunties Are For Taking

Grab a chance and you won't be sorry for a might-have-been.
—Arthur Ransome, 1884—1967 British novelist

There is a tide in the affairs of men
Which, taken at the flood. leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and miseries
On such a full sea are now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.
—William Shakespeare, 1564—1616 English poet and playwright

If your ship doesn't come in, swim out to it.
—Anonymous

Do not wait for extraordinary circumstances to do good; try to use ordinary situations.
—Jean Paul Richter, 1763—1825 German novelist

Great opportunities to help others seldom come, but small ones surround us daily.
—Sally Koch American writer

To improve the golden moment of opportunity, and catch the good that is within our reach, is the great art of life.
—William James, 1842—1910 American psychologist and philospher

Source: The Ultimate Pocket Positives: A Second Anthology of Inspirational Thoughts Compiled by Maggie Pinkey. The Five Mile Press 2001 Reprinted 2002 ISBN = 1 86503 579 3

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October 20, 2005

How Far You Go

How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant of the weak and strong.
Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.
—George Washington Carver

Source: Inspirational Daily Calendar Tuesday, October 18, 2005 entry

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October 17, 2005

Mistakes and Actions: Winning Combination

Success seems to be connected with action. Successful men keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don't quit.
—Conrad Hilton

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Saturday/Sunday, October 15/16, 2005 entry

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October 11, 2005

Fail to Tap Ingenuity

There are young people out there cutting raw cocaine with chemicals from the local hardware store. They are manufacturing new highs and new products buy soaking marijuana in ever changing agents, and each of these new drugs is more addictive, more deadly and less costly than the last. How is it that we have failed to tap that ingenuity, that sense of experimentation? How is it that these kids who can measure grams and kilos and can figure out complex monetary transactions cannot pass a simple math or chemistry test?
—Senator Kohl, from the U.S. Senate Hearing: "Crisis in Math and Science Education."

Source: Teachers daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday June 5/6, 2004
See also: Senator Herb Khol (WI)

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October 9, 2005

Nothing is Impossible

Nothing is impossible; there are ways that lead to everything, and if we had sufficient will we should have sufficient means. It is often merely for an excuse that we say things are impossible.
—Francois de la Rochefoucald

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Monday, September 12, 2005 entry

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October 6, 2005

Things That Matter Most

Things which matter most must never be at the mercy of things which matter least.
—Johann von Goethe

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Tuesday October 4, 2005 entry

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October 2, 2005

An Argument's Aim

The aim of an argument or discussion should be progress, not victory.
—Joseph Joubert

Source: Inspirational calendar Sat/Sun June 16/17 June 2002 entry. Sunday, June 16, 2002 was Father's Day.
See also Joseph Joubert: Wikipedia Entry

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September 30, 2005

Deep Inside Us is Valuable

We do not believe in ourselves until someone reveals that what is deep inside us is valuable, worth listening to, worthy of our trust, sacred to our touch. Once we believe in ourselves we can risk curiosity, wonder, spontaneous delight, or any experience that reveals the human spirit.
—e.e. cummings

Source: Teachers Daily calendar Thursday, September 29, 2005 entry

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September 28, 2005

Real Courage

You risked your life, but what else have you risked? Have you ever risked disapproval? Have you ever risked economic security? Have you ever risked a belief? I see nothing particularly courageous in risking one's life. So you lose it, you go to your hero's heaven and everything is milk and honey 'til the end of time. Right? You get your reward and suffer no earthly consequences. That's not courage.
Real courage is risking something you have to keep on living with, real courage is risking something that might force you to rethink your thoughts and suffer change and stretch consciousness. Real courage is risking one's clichs.
—Tom Robbins in Another Roadside Attraction

Source: Words I Wish I Wrote: A Collection of Writing That Inspired My Ideas by Robert Fulghum published by HarperCollins 1997 ISBN: 0060175605

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September 14, 2005

A Thing Impossible?

Nothing is impossible; there are ways that lead to everything, and if we had sufficient will we should always have sufficient means. It is often merely for an excuse that we say that things are impossible.
—François de La Rochefoucauld

Source: Inspirational Calendar Monday, September 12, 2005 entry

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September 12, 2005

Consider the Source, or the Idea?

If an idea comes from someone very gentle or great, without much thinking about the idea itself, one tends to be more accepting of the idea. We must rely more on the substance of the idea, rather than the authority of the person who it comes from
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Thursday, November 18th 2004 entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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September 9, 2005

Do What You Can

It is the greatest of all mistakes to do nothing because you can do only a little.
Do what you can.
—Sydney Smith

Source: Inspirational Calendar Thursday, September 8, 2005 entry
See also Wikipedia's article Sydney Smith, English writer and clergyman

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September 7, 2005

Entrusted Talent

Work while you have the light. You are responsible for the talent that has been entrusted to you.
—Henri Frederic Amiel

Source: Inspirational Calendar Monday, September 5, 2005 entry
See also: Henri Frederic Amiel on Wikipedia.org

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September 4, 2005

Obstacles Melt Away

Most of our obstacle would melt away if, instead of cowering before them, we should make up our minds to walk boldly through them.
—Orison Swett Marden

Source: Inspirational Calendar, Thursday, August 18, 2005 entry
See also: Orison Swett Marden.com

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August 21, 2005

Marriage - The Supreme Felicity

Marriage--yes, it is the supreme felicity of life. I concede it. And it is also the supreme tragedy of life. The deeper the love the surer the tragedy. And the more disconsolating when it comes.
—Mark Twain
—Letter to Father Fitz-Simon, 6/5/1908

Source: twainquotes.com's Marriage Quotations

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August 12, 2005

When My Hair is Grey?

Wilt thou love me, sweet, when my hair is grey
And my cheeks shall have lost their hue?
When the charms of youth shall have passed away,
Will your love as of old prove true?

For the looks may change, and the heart may range,
And the love be no longer fond;
Wilt thou love with truth in the years of youth
And away to the years beyond?

Oh, I love you, sweet, for your locks of brown
And the blush on your cheek that lies --
But I love you most for the kindly heart
That I see in your sweet blue eyes.

For the eyes are signs of the soul within,
Of the heart that is real and true,
And mine own sweetheart, I shall love you still,
Just as long as your eyes are blue.

For the locks may bleach, and the cheeks of peach
May be reft of their golden hue;
But mine own sweetheart, I shall love you still,
Just as long as your eyes are blue.

As Long as your Eyes are Blue by A.B. (Banjo) Paterson

Source: Saltbush Bill, J.P. and Other Verses on WorldWideSchool.org by A.B. (Banjo) Paterson
This poem, As Long as your Eyes are Blue, was first published in the Sydney Australia newspaper, "The Bulletin," 7 Nov 1891.

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August 9, 2005

Creativity and Courage

Creativity requires the courage to let go of certainties.
—Erich Fromm

Source: Creativity Quotes on Wisdom.com
See also: Erich Fromm on Wikipedia.org

This is my 300th entry! Yeah, me! :-)

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August 6, 2005

The Earth is Full of Breathless Whisperings

Only of thee and me the nightwind sings;
        Only of us the lovers speak at sea;
The earth is full of breathless whisperings
        Only of thee and me.

Only of thee and me the forests chant;
        Only of us the stir in bush and tree;
The rain and sun inform the blossoming plant
        Only of thee and me.

Only of thee and me till all shall fade;
        Only of us the world's first thought can be
For we are love, and heaven itself is made
        Only of thee and me.
—Louis Untermeyer

Source: Love Lyrics selected and edited by Louis Untermeyer Second Printing 1967 The Odyssey Press

This entry dedicated to Emily and Tim who were married this day in the Hood River valley in the shadow of Oregon's Mt. Hood. Your family and friends witnessed and affirm your love and your future.
With all our love, Rich

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August 1, 2005

Charge of the Light Brigade

U.S. Navy PH3 Konstandinos Goumenidis

USS MCCAMPBELL (DDG-85) Underway July 2004

Pacific Ocean (July 26, 2005) - USS McCampbell (DDG 85) prepares to go alongside USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) to conduct a fueling at sea (FAS), as USS Decatur (DDG 73) navigates off her starboard quarter. (RELEASED)

Half a league, half a league, 
      Half a league onward, 
All in the valley of Death 
      Rode the six hundred. 
'Forward, the Light Brigade! 
Charge for the guns!' he said: 
Into the valley of Death 
      Rode the six hundred. 
 
'Forward, the Light Brigade!' 
Was there a man dismay'd ? 
Not tho' the soldier knew 
      Some one had blunder'd: 
Their's not to make reply, 
Their's not to reason why,  
Their's but to do and die:  
Into the valley of Death 
      Rode the six hundred. 
 
Cannon to right of them, 
Cannon to left of them, 
Cannon in front of them 
      Volley'd and thunder'd; 
Storm'd at with shot and shell, 
Boldly they rode and well, 
Into the jaws of Death, 
Into the mouth of Hell 
      Rode the six hundred. 
 
Flash'd all their sabres bare, 
Flash'd as they turn'd in air 
Sabring the gunners there, 
Charging an army, while 
      All the world wonder'd: 
Plunged in the battery-smoke 
Right thro' the line they broke; 
Cossack and Russian 
Reel'd from the sabre-stroke 
      Shatter'd and sunder'd. 
Then they rode back, but not 
      Not the six hundred. 
 
Cannon to right of them, 
Cannon to left of them, 
Cannon behind them 
      Volley'd and thunder'd; 
Storm'd at with shot and shell, 
While horse and hero fell, 
They that had fought so well 
Came thro' the jaws of Death, 
Back from the mouth of Hell, 
All that was left of them, 
      Left of six hundred. 
 
When can their glory fade ? 
O the wild charge they made! 
      All the world wonder'd. 
Honour the charge they made! 
Honour the Light Brigade, 
      Noble six hundred! 

by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)

Source: Mediadrome's Poetry - Tennyson: The Charge of the Light Brigade

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July 31, 2005

In The Mutilation Mill

Oh, it isn't cheerful to see a man, the marvelous work of God,
Crushed in the mutilation mill, crushed to a smeary clod;
Oh, it isn't cheerful to hear him moan; but it isn't that I mind,
It isn't the anguish that goes with him, it's the anguish he leaves behind.
For his going opens a tragic door that gives on a world of pain,
And the death he dies, those who live and love, will die again and again.
—Robert W. Service

Source: Only A Boche poem by Robert W. Service included in Rhymes of a Red Cross Man by Robert W. Service 1916 published by Barse & Hopkins
Service is writing about World War I from the Allies point of view.

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July 18, 2005

Learning Naturally

Give the pupils something to do, not something to learn; and the doing is of such a nature as to demand thinking; learning naturally results.
—John Dewey

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday, July 16/17, 2005
See also: John Dewey - Wikipedia, the Free Encylopedia

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July 17, 2005

Why Do Human Beings Kill and Injure?

Imagine there's no heaven,
It's easy if you try,
No hell below us,
Above us only sky,
Imagine all the people
living for today...

Imagine there's no countries,
It isnt hard to do,
Nothing to kill or die for,
No religion too,
Imagine all the people
living life in peace...

Imagine no possesions,
I wonder if you can,
No need for greed or hunger,
A brotherhood of man,
Imagine all the people
Sharing all the world...

You may say Im a dreamer,
but Im not the only one,
I hope some day you'll join us,
And the world will live as one.
—John Lennon

Source: Merseyworld.com's Imagine : LyricsWritten by: John Lennon Bag productions inc

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July 16, 2005

Need to Go Further

Sometimes we need to go further than we thought we could. We need to go past our fear, past our uncertainty, past the bend we can't see beyond. If we stay on the course, and go round the bend, we may find what we're looking for.
—Melody Beattie

Source: July 16th entry Journey to the Heart: Daily Meditation on the Path to Freeing Your Soul by Melody BeattieHarperCollins 1996 ISBN 0-06-251121-1
See also: Melodie Beattie's Web site

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July 10, 2005

Get Meaning Into Your Life

The way you get meaning into your life is to devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to the community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.
—Morrie Schwartz

Source: Tuesdays with Morrie: an Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom 1st ed. 1997 by Doubleday ISBN: 0-385-48451-8

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July 1, 2005

Do All the Good

Do all the good you can,
by all the means you can,
in all the ways you can,
as long as ever you can.
—John Wesley

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Thursday, June 30, 2005
See also: John Wesley Biography and Bibliography

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June 30, 2005

Rid of All Suffering: How Soon?

It is important not to have the unrealistic expectation that we will find a magic key to help get rid of [all suffering]. It takes determination, patience, and more than one week.
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Tuesday, May 31th 2005 entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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June 29, 2005

Trust: The Dots in Your Life Connect

You have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future....

You have to trust in something - your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down and it has made all the difference in my life....

You have to find what you love. The only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work....

Your time is limited. Don't waste it living someone else's life. Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition....

Stay hungry, stay foolish.
—Steve Jobs
CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, Commencement address at Stanford University, delivered on June 12, 2005.

Source: The other side of the dream by Garry Barker, Sydney Morning Herald June 23, 2005
To read his entire speech, see also: Steve Jobs at Stanford, June 12, 2005

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June 28, 2005

Look Around You

Stop a moment, cease your work, and look around you.
—Thomas Carlye

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Saturday/Sunday, June 25/26, 2005

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June 25, 2005

Life's Learning: Aldous Huxley

Let us be kinder to one another.
—Aldous Huxley: reportedly on his deathbed, reflecting on his entire life's learning.

Source: Who Will Cry When You Die? Life Lessons From the Monk Who Sold His Ferrari by Robin S. Sharma 1999 HarpersCollins ISBN 0-00-638578-8
See also, Robin Sharma Online

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June 19, 2005

Traditions Kept Alive

The study of history helps keep traditions alive. When we study how our ancestors dealt with challenges, we can (hopefully) learn from their successes and failures, and fashion our responses to challenges in even more naturally human ways.
—Fred Rogers

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Wednesday, June 15, 2005
—From the book The World According to Mr. Rogers by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Father's Day 2005: This entry is honors all our fathers. Some of us had fathers who were loving and nurturing. Some had other experiences. We honor all, because they moved us to the journey, the path we are on now.
I specifically honor my Dad, Richard C., because he is my inspiration to continue on my journey. Thank you, Dad, I love you.

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June 16, 2005

Inspire to Teach

Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself.
—Chinese Proverb

One's mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions.
—Oliver Wendell Holmes

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.
—William Butler Yeats

Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body.
—Marcus Tullius Cicero

Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.
—Robert Frost

Draw a crazy picture, Write a nutty poem, Sing a mumble-gumble song; Whistle through your comb. Do a looney-gooney dance 'Cross the Kitchen Floor, Put something silly in the world that ain't been there before.
—Shel Silverstein

Source: Shared with me by one of my April 2005 Term students, Jennifer, on June 15, 2005.
Thank you, Jennifer.

June 10, 2005

Empathize with Your Enemy

My Turn
The war in Iraq, specifically America's role of leadership in this war, is a painful invitation to ask ourselves what, if anything, we've learned from previous wars. I, like you, am revolted by the brutal killing of hundreds of thousands of innocent people during any war. And, like you, I'm saddened by the apparent inability of human beings to find less violent solutions to conflict and terrorism. What can we learn from previous wars? Are there lessons from past experiences that can help reduce or minimize the likelihood of excessive and unnecessary destruction and devastation of lives and countries, and our future on Earth? I believe the answer is yes! We can learn, and there are lessons available.
—Dr. Wayne W. Dyer
Read the entire article

Source: My Turn Online Article by Dr. Wayne Dyer (visited Thursday, June 9, 2005)
See also an index of Dr. Dyer's Online Articles

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June 9, 2005

On Being Stuck

You are not stuck where you are unless you decide to be.
—Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

Source: Everyday Wisdom by Dr. Wayne W. Dyer published by Hay House 1993 ISBN 1-56170-076-2
See also Dr. Dyer's Official Web site

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June 8, 2005

Poetry: A Definition

If I read a book [and] it makes my whole body so cold no fire ever can warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.
—Emily Dickinson to Thomas Wentworth Higginson

Source: Writer's Almanac: Wednesday, June 8, 2005 by Garrison Keillor
It was on this day in 1862 that Emily Dickinson wrote to Thomas Wentworth Higginson asking him to be her friend and her advisor.

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June 6, 2005

President Roosevelt's D-Day Prayer (June 6, 1944)

On the morning of June 6, 1944, Americans awoke to the news that Allied forces were in the process of landing on the coast of France in Normandy. Later that morning, newspapers published a message from the President, which included a prayer for the success of the operation, and a request that the nation join him in prayer during his radio broadcast that evening.

My fellow Americans:

Last night, when I spoke with you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that troops of the United States and our allies were crossing the Channel in another and greater operation. It has come to pass with success thus far.

And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join with me in prayer.


Almighty God:

Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true; give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again; and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest - until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men's souls will be shaken with the violences of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home - fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters, and brothers of brave men overseas - whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them - help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the Nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too - strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and the material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us Faith. Give us Faith in Thee; Faith in our sons; Faith in each other; Faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment - let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister Nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace - a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all of men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.

Thy will be done, Almighty God.

Amen
—President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Source: Strategypage.com's On War & Warfare: D-Day

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May 14, 2005

No More Rewarding a Career

U.S. Navy PHAN Jeremy L. Grisham

USS LABOON (DDG-58) Underway April 2004

Atlantic Ocean (April 24, 2004) The guided missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) steams south toward the Florida coast. Laboon was one of several ships invited to take part in "Fleet Week 2005" in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. (RELEASED)

I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction: 'I served in the United States Navy.'
—President John F. Kennedy, 1 August 1963, in Bancroft Hall at the U. S. Naval Academy.

Source: Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F. Kennedy, Containing the Public Messages, Speeches, and Statements of the President, January 1 to November 22, 1963 [Washington: Government Printing Office, 1964], 620

 

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May 12, 2005

The Owl and the Pussy Cat

The owl and the pussy-cat went to sea
    In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey and plenty of money,
    Wrapped up in a five pound note.
The owl look up to the stars above,
    And sang to a small guitar,
O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
  What a beautiful Pussy you are,
       You are,
       You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!
—Edward Lear from his poem The Owl and the Pussy-cat.
   To read the entire poem, see The Owl and the Pussycat online

Source: Edward Lear: The Complete Verse and Other Nonsense Edited by Vivien Noakes Penguin Books (U.S.A.) 2001 ISBN 0-14-20.0227-5

Thursday, May 12, 2005

It's the birthday of the man who wrote,
    "There was an old man who supposed That the street door was partially closed, But some very large rats ate his coats and his hats While that futile old gentleman dozed."

That was Edward Lear, born in London (1812). He was the 20th of 21 childrenalmost half of whom had died in infancy. He was raised by his sister who taught him to paint birds and flowers.

There was a market for illustrated books about birds, so Edward Lear got into that business and became a successful bird illustrator. He always painted from life. He painted the specimens that Charles Darwin brought back from his trip on the H.M.S. Beagle,/cite>.

He suffered from depression, epilepsy, and terrible eyesight. He felt like an outcast in British society.

In 1832 came a turning point in his life. The Earl of Darby invited Edward Lear to come and paint all the animals in his private zoo, and Lear did and arrived at the estate and wound up spending most of his free time with the Earl's grandchildren. Edward Lear had never spent any time with children before. He found that he loved them. He became a clown. He sang songs for them, he drew cartoons, and he made up humorous poems.

And he wrote down those poems and they became his Book of Nonsense, which came out in 1846, the poem about the owl and the pussycat who went to sea in a beautiful pea green boat and the poem about the jumblies and others.

Source: Garrison Keilor's The Writer's Almanac for May 12, 2005

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May 11, 2005

Triumph of Enthusiasm

Every memorable act in the history of the world is a triumph of enthusiasm. Nothing great was ever achieved without it because it gives any challenge or any occupation, no matter how frightening or difficult, a new meaning. Without enthusiasm you are doomed to a life of mediocrity but with it you can accomplish miracles.
—Og Mandino

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar Tuesday, May 10, 2005 entry
See also: The World of Og Mandino, Salesman

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May 8, 2005

Tribute to Mother's Day

Today, Sunday, May 8, 2005, is Mother's Day in the USA.
I honor my Mom, Minna. She has been an inspiration to me all my life. She always has a sense of optimism and adventure mixed in with a tad of wanderlust. She loved my Dad, myself and my sister with her whole heart. Mom is always finding new learning experiences and is outgoing with everyone. I love you, Mom. Thank you for being such a wonderful Mom

The most important thing a father can do for his children is to love their mother.
—Author Unknown

Making the decision to have a child-it's momentous. It is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.
—Elizabeth Stone

Source: Mother's Day Quotes on 123holiday.net
See also: Blackdog's Mother's Day History

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May 6, 2005

Earth Feels Needed

Jogging is very beneficial. It's good for your legs and your feet. It's also very good for the ground. It makes it feel needed.
—Charles M. Schulz

Source: Email of 04 May 2005 from a former student
See also the Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center

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April 28, 2005

Music is Most Universal

Among the many forces in which the human spirit has tried to express its innermost yearnings and perceptions, music is perhaps the most universal. It symbolizes humanity's search for harmony, with oneself and others, with nature, and with the spiritual and sacred within and around us.
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Thursday, April 28th 2005 entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

April 21, 2005

Most Beautiful in the World

The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt within the heart.
—Helen Keller

Source: Helen Keller Quotes - The Quotation Page

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April 18, 2005

See Things, Say Why

You see things; and you say, "Why?"
but I dream things that never were; and say, "Why not?"
—George Bernard Shaw

Source: Daily Inspirational Calendar, Friday, April 15, 2005

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April 17, 2005

Sentence as Primary Element

The sentence is my primary element, my tool, goal, bliss. Each new sentence is a heart-in-the mouth experiment.
—Cynthia Ozick

Source: Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Sunday, April 17, 2005
Cynthia Ozick was born on April 17, 1928. See also Cynthia Ozick's online biography

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April 12, 2005

Solar System: Sun-Centric or Earth-Centric?

NASA photo: The crew of Apollo 8 were the first humans to witness the Earth rising over the Moon's horizon

Apollo 8: NASA photo

Apollo 8: December 24, 1968

The crew of Apollo 8 were the first humans to witness the Earth rising over the Moon's horizon.

By my remarkable observations, the sky...was opened a hundred or a thousand times wider than anything seen by the learned of all the past centuries. Now, that sky is diminished for me to a space no greater than that which is occupied by my own body.
—Galileo

Source Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, April 12, 2005
Also consider that Galileo wrote this in a letter to a friend after having been blinded by an eye infection. He was unable to get medical care because he was under house arrest following a conviction of heresy by the Roman Catholic Church. It was on this day in 1633 that Galileo was put on trial for publishing evidence that the sun and not the earth is the center of the solar system. He was a devout Catholic but didn't believe his ideas should threaten the church. He wrote, the "Holy Sprit intended to teach us in the Bible how to go to Heaven, not how the heavens go."
See also Rice University's The Galileo Project


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April 4, 2005

Purpose in Life

. . . . I wish you a great life filled with wisdom, happiness and fullfilment. May your days be spent in work that is engaging, on pursuits that are inspiring and with people who are loving. I'd like to leave you with the following words of George Bernard Shaw, which capture the essence of the final lesson far better than I ever could:

This is the true joy in life, being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one, being a true force of Nature instead of a feverish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the whole community, and, as long as I live, it is my privilege to do for it whatever I can.

I want to be thoroughly used up when I die. For the harder I work, the more I live. I rejoice in life for its sake. Life is no brief candle for me. It's a sort of splendid torch which I've got to hold up for the moment and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.

Source: Who Will Cry When You Die? Life Lessons From the Monk Who Sold His Ferrari by Robin S. Sharma 1999 HarpersCollins ISBN 0-00-638578-8

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April 2, 2005

Pope John II Passes Over the Veil

photo: NY Times

Bronze Door Closes on a Life

A Swiss Guard closes the bronze door under the portico in Saint Peter's Square, where several thousand people gathered to be close to Pope John Paul II, at the Vatican April 2, 2005. This door is closed every night and over the centuries it is also closed when a pope dies and is kept closed until a new pontiff is elected.

Humanity should question itself, once more, about the absurd and always unfair phenomenon of war, on whose stage of death and pain only remain standing the negotiating table that could and should have prevented it.
—Pope John Paul II

Source: Pope John Paul II Quotes on BrainyQuote.com

Pope John Paul II died on Saturday, the Vatican announced. The 84-year-old Pontiff, who had headed the Roman Catholic Church for 26 years, died at 9.37 p.m (1937 GMT), a statement said.
REUTERS/Max Rossi

One who exercises as much power as the pope will never be free of controversy, no matter how exemplary his life; the secular world is not in the habit of conferring sainthood on people. But John Paul II, after his death yesterday at 84, will be seen by most, we think, as a remarkable witness, to use a favorite term of his -- witness to a vision characterized by humaneness, honesty and integrity throughout his reign and his life.
—Washington Post, Sunday, April 3, 2005

Source: Washington Post, Sunday April 3, 2005 Editorial

 

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March 27, 2005

Closest Friends

The closest friends I have made through my life have been people who also grew up close to a loved and loving grandmother and grandfather.
—Margaret Mead

Source: Grandparents: A Book of Favorite Quotations, Words of Wisdom edited by Kristin Shea 2003 Barnes & Noble Books ISBN 0-7607-4066-6
See also: Margaret Mead's Life and Work

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March 26, 2005

Unbending Principles

I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times.
—Everett Dirksen

Source: Leadership Quotes on wisdomquotes.com
See also: Senator Everett Dirksen's Biography

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March 22, 2005

Forgiveness and Love

Forgiveness is the ability to give love away in the most difficult of circumstances.
—Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

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March 19, 2005

Achieve the Impossible

To achieve the impossible, it is precisely the unthinkable that must be thought.
—Tom Robbins

Source: Daily Inspirations Calendar, Friday, March 18, 2005
See also: Tom Robbins Quotes - ThinkExist Quotations
and Tom Robbins biographical entry on WikiPedia.

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March 17, 2005

Family and Links

In every conceivable way, the family is link to our past, bridge to our future.
—Alex Haley

Source: CA 100 students contribution on Saint Patrick's Day, March 17, 2005
See also: Alex Haley on WisdomQuotes.com

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March 7, 2005

Be Regular?

We must overcome the notion that we must be regular... it robs you of the chance to be extraordinary and leads you to the mediocre.
—Uta Hagen

Source: Daily Inspirations Calendar, Friday, February 25, 2005
See also Uta Hagen's biography

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March 6, 2005

Nurturing Element in Us All

There's a nurturing element to all human beings, whenever they themselves have been nurtured, and it's going to be expressed one way or another.
—Fred Rogers

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Friday, March 4, 2005
—From the book The World According to Mr. Rogers by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

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March 3, 2005

A Few Blisters

If you want a place in the sun, you have to put up with a few blisters.
—Abigail Van Buren

Source: Inspirational Daily Calendar 19/20 February 2005, Saturday/Sunday entry

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March 2, 2005

Learn and Hold

Learn as though you would never be able to master it; hold it as though you would be in fear of losing it.
—Confucius

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar Tuesday, March 1, 2005 entry

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February 27, 2005

What Man Descends From

We need not worry so much about what man descends from — it's what he descends to that shames the human race.
—Mark Twain

Source: The Little Book of Humrous Quotations edited by Alison Bullivant 2004 Barnes & Noble Books

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February 23, 2005

Whole Idea of Living

The whole idea of living is to believe the best is yet to come.
—Peter Ustinov

Source: Expect a Miracle series window card by Compendium, Inc.

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February 19, 2005

To Change Our World

Think of an idea to change our world
——and put it into ACTION!
—Mr. Eugene Simonet (Middle School Social Studies Teacher) played by Kevin Spacey in the movie Pay It Forward (2000)

Source: Pay It Forward DVD ISBN: 0-7907-5680-3
Mr. Simonet's Social Studies assignment to his seventh graders that inspired the character Trevor McKinney's Pay It Forward idea. Trevor was played by the young actor Haley Joel Osment.

February 17, 2005

Shrimp is the Fruit of the Sea

Anyway, like I was sayin', shrimp is the fruit of the sea. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, sautee it. Dey's uh, shrimp-kabobs, shrimp creole, shrimp gumbo. Pan fried, deep fried, stir-fried. There's pineapple shrimp, lemon shrimp, coconut shrimp, pepper shrimp, shrimp soup, shrimp stew, shrimp salad, shrimp and potatoes, shrimp burger, shrimp sandwich. That- that's about it.
—Bubba [played by Mykelti Williamson] in the movie Forrest Gump (1994)

Source: Memorable Quotes from Forrest Gump (1994)

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February 16, 2005

All I Really Need to Learn

Most of what I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sandpile at Sunday school.
These are the things I learned:
  • Share everything.
  • Play fair.
  • Don't hit people.
  • Put things back where you found them.
  • Clean up your own mess.
  • Don't take things that aren't yours.
  • Say you're sorry when you hurt someone.
  • Wash your hands before you eat.
  • Flush.
  • Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.
  • When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
  • Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the styrofoam cup: The roots go dwon and the plant goes up and nobody really kows how or why, but we are all like that.
  • Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and even the little seed in the styrofoam cup—they all die. So do we.
  • And then remember that Dick-and-Jane books and the first word you learned—the biggest word of all—LOOK.

Source: All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things by Robert Fulghum 1989 Villard Books
See also All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten : Fifteenth Anniversary Edition Reconsidered, Revised, & Expanded With Twenty-Five New Essays ISBN: 0345466179

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February 15, 2005

Ants in the Lunchroom

Appearing this morning at quarter past nine
they entered our lunchroom and mustered a line.
They seemed to be dancing, or whistling a tune,
then ran out the door with a fork and a spoon.

They quickly came back for a knife and a plate,
not bothered at all by the size or the weight.
They grabbed all the glasses and cups they could find.
They bagged every bowl, leaving nothing behind.

They worked through the morning, 'til mid-afternoon,
and carried off every last saucer and spoon.
They searched every shelf and they emptied each drawer,
then pilfered the platters and dashed out the door.

They put on a truly impressive display
until they were finished and wandered away.
Although we were puzzled, we had to conclude
those ants were no dummies; they left all the food.

Source: Kiddie Thoughts: Thoughtful Poems Ants in the Lunchroom

This entry is dedicated to my friend and fellow poetry lovers Tucker and Hannah.
Tucker's Mom, Krista, shared with me the other day about how Tucker memorized this poem, and recited the entire poem at his school's poetry workshop, parents and schoolmates all. His Mom told me how splendidly he did, and that he got tremendous laughs and applause.
Hannah's Mom told me about Hannah's original poem and that she confidently and proudly recited her poem at the poetry program.
I am inspired by these two wonderful children's deep love of poetry.
Aho, Tucker and Hannah

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February 14, 2005

Treasure This Day

Treasure this day, and treasure yourself.
Truly, neither will ever happen again.
—Ray Bradbury

Source: Expect a Miracle series window card by Compendium, Inc.

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February 10, 2005

Dreams We Can Make Come True

How great it is when we come to know that time of disappointment can be followed by times of fulfillment; that sorrow can be followed by joy; that guilt over falling short of our ideals can be replaced by pride in doing all we can; and that anger can be channeled into creative achievements...and into dreams that we can make come true.
—Fred Rogers

Source: The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

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February 8, 2005

How Important You Are

If you could only sense how important you are to the lives you meet; how important you can be to the people you may never dream of. There is something of yourself that you leave at every meeting with another person.
—Fred Rogers

Source: The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

I honor the memory of a colleague of mine of the last five years who passed on to the next adventure across the veil last Friday, February 4, 2005. Fair Winds and following seas to you shipmate, Michael.

Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
—Dylan Thomas -- Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night

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February 6, 2005

Affection & Compassion

At the beginning of our lives and again when we become old we appreciate others' help and affection. Unfortunately, between these two periods of our lives, when we are strong and able and can look after ourselves, we neglect the value of affection and compassion.
—attributed to HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Wednesday, December 8th 2004 (First Day of Hanukkah) entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

February 5, 2005

Wish for Children

My own wish for children is that they learn to find joy even amidst the world's and their own imperfections, that they grow to have a clear but forgiving interior voice to guide them, and that they come to have a reasonable sense of shame without unreasonable burdens of guilt.
—Fred Rogers

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar February 4, 2005 entry
from the book The World According to Mr. Rogers by Fred Rogers
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

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February 3, 2005

Saddest Four Words....

The saddest words of tongue or pen are these words ---it might have been.
---Oliver Wendell Holmes

Source: Whatever It Takes series window card by Compendium, Inc.
See also: ThinkExist.com's Oliver Wendell Holmes Quotations

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January 29, 2005

Who is Your Mentor and Teacher?

The mentor/teacher is the person who sees who you are, sees your beauty, falls in love with it, helps and inspires it, giving it a chance to bloom in the world.
---James Hillman

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, January 20, 2005 entry
See also: Insight & Outlook's Interview with James Hillman

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January 20, 2005

We Live For?

What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for others?
---George Eliot

Source: Practice Kindness series window card by Compendium, Inc.

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January 18, 2005

To Be Noble

To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler
--and less trouble.
---Mark Twain - Doctor Van Dyke speech, 1906

Source: MarkTwain Quotations Teaching.
See twainquotes.com for more Mark Twain quotations.

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January 17, 2005

I Have a Dream

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit together at the table of brotherhood . . . that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today
---Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, January 15/16, 2005 entry
See also: American Rhetoric's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: I Have a Dream

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January 11, 2005

Becoming Great

Great people are those who make others feel they, too, can become great.
--Mark Twain

Source: Inspirations Daily Calendar January 10, 2005 entry

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January 7, 2005

Anyway: The Paradoxical Commandments

People are illogical, and self-centered.
Love them anyway.

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives.
Do good anyway.

If you are successful, you will win false friends and true enemies.
Succeed anyway.

The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow.
Do good anyway.

Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable.
Be honest and frank anyway.

The biggest men and women with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men and women with the smallest minds.
Think big anyway.

People favor underdogs, but follow only top dogs.
Fight for a few underdogs anyway.

What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight.
Build anyway.

People really need help but may attack you if you do help them.
Help people anyway.

Give the world the best you have and you'll get kicked in the teeth.
Give the world the best you have anyway.

Dr. Kent M. Keith in Anyway: The Paradoxical Commandments, Finding Personal Meaning in a Crazy World, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 2001, ISBN 0-399-14945-7.

Source: Used by permission of Dr. Kent M. Keith. See Anyway, The Paradoxical Commandments - Do It Anyway

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January 1, 2005

Truth and Error

An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody will see it.
---Mahatma Gandhi

Source: The Official Mahatma Gandhi Archives: Quotes

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December 31, 2004

Voice Within You

The more faithfully you listen to the voice within you, the better you hear what is sounding outside. And only he who listens can speak..
---Dag Hammarskjold,
Secretary-General of the United Nations from 10 April 1953 until 18 September 1961

Source: Educational Quotes for the 21st Century
See also Dag Hammarskjold's bio

Also, from Dag Hammarskjold

Your position never gives you the right to command. It only imposes on you the duty of so living your life that others can receive your orders without being humiliated.
---Dag Hammarskjold

Source: Brainy Quotes by Dag Hammarskjold

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December 27, 2004

How in the World It All Came About!

USN photo by PHAN Morton. The US Navy's guided missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) prepares to pull alongside (port-side to) the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) to conduct a replenishment at sea (RAS). SHOUP, LINCOLN, and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) were deployed to the Western Pacific Ocean as of 01 Dec 2004.

U.S. Navy photo by
Photographer's Mate Airman Nicholas B. Morton

Haze Gray and Underway: Romeo Close-Up

The US Navy's guided missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) prepares to pull alongside (port-side to) the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) to conduct a replenishment at sea (RAS). SHOUP, LINCOLN, and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) were deployed to the Western Pacific Ocean as of 01 Dec 2004.

Just occasionally you find yourself in an odd situation.
You get into it by degrees and in the most natural way, but, when you are right in the midst of it, you are suddenly astonished and ask yourself how in the world it all came about.
---Thor Heyerdahl, Kon-Tiki, 1951

Source: The Exploding Whale: and Other Remarkable Stories from the Evening News by Paul Linnman
One of the almost dozen books my sweet Bride, Carol, presented to me on this glorious Christmas Day.

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December 25, 2004

Peace on Earth: Christmas 2004

There can be no peace as long as there is grinding poverty, social injustice, inequality, oppression, environmental degradation, and as long as the weak and small continue to be trodden by the mighty and powerful.

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Saturday, December 25th 2004 (Christmas Day) entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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December 24, 2004

A Visit From Saint Nicholas

Source: NORAD's Santa Tracking 2004

Santa seen Christmas 1959

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse,
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there.
The children were nestled all snug in their bed,
While visions of sugarplums danced in their heads,
And mamma in her 'kerchief, and I in my cap,

Had just settled our brains for a long winter's nap...
When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash.
The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow
Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below,
When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny reindeer,

With a little old driver, so lively and quick,
I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick.
More rapid than eagles his coursers they came,
And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name:
"Now, Dasher! now, Dancer! now Prancer and Vixen!
On, Comet! on Cupid! on, Donder and Blitzen!
To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall!
Now dash away! dash away! dash away all!"

As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly,
When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky,
So up to the house-top the coursers they flew,
With the sleigh full of toys, and St. Nicholas too.
And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof
The prancing and pawing of each little hoof.
As I drew in my head, and was turning around,
Down the chimney St. Nicholas came with a bound.
He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot,
And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot.
A bundle of toys he had flung on his back,
And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack.

His eyes -- how they twinkled -- his dimples how merry!
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry!
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow.
The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,
And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath.
He had a broad face and a little round belly
That shook, when he laughed, like a bowl full of jelly.

He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf,
And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself.
A wink of his eye and a twist of his head
Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread.
He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,
And filled all the stockings; then turned with a jerk,
And laying his finger aside of his nose,
And giving a nod, up the chimney he rose.
He sprang to his sleigh, to his teams gave a whistle,
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.
But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight,
"Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good-night!"

---Clement C. Moore A Visit From Saint Nicholas

Source: A Visit From St. Nick on the New York Institue for Special Education Web site.
Clement Clarke Moore (1779-1863) was the only son of Benjamin Moore, president of Columbia College and bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in New York. He was a graduate of Columbia College and got a Masters Degree from there in 1801.
Moore married Catherine Elizabeth Taylor in 1813, and they settled at Chelsea, in what was then a country estate outside New York City. "A Visit From Saint Nicholas" (1822) was written as a Christmas gift for his children.
From 1840 to 1850, he was a member of the board of managers of The New York Institution for the Blind. The school was then know as The New York Institution for the Blind. The school was located on 34th Street and 9th Avenue during that era. The school moved to Pelham Parkway in the Bronx in 1922 and it is known as The New York Institute for Special Education.

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December 23, 2004

I Think of You

That this longing for you follows wherever I go
In the roaring traffic's boom
In the silence of my lonely room
I think of you
Day and night, night and day

Under the hide of me
There's an oh such a hungry yearning burning inside of me
And this torment won't be through
Until you let me spend my life making love to you
Day and night, night and day

---Cole Porter Night and Day lyrics

Source: Written by Cole Porter 1932 for the show The Gay Divorcee

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December 17, 2004

Wright Brothers Take Flight

First Flight, December 17, 1903

Source: Wright Brothers History

First Flight, December 17, 1903.

It was on this day in 1903 that Orville and Wilbur Wright successfully completed the first sustained, power-driven flight, in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers had chosen Kitty Hawk because of its consistently high winds, and had practiced there with gliders in 1900 and 1902. By 1903 they had built an engine that would allow them to fly, and discovered a new method for steering during flight. Each brother flew twice, but it was the final flight, made by Wilbur, that was actually controlled and lasted the longest, fifty-nine seconds. The first flight, made by Orville, lasted twelve seconds and was recorded in a now-famous photograph. The flights were witnessed by four adults and a boy. They were reported only by local newspapers, and much of the reporting was not accurate.

Source: Wright Brothers History: The Tale of the Airplane, A Brief Account of the Invention of the Airplane researched, written, and designed by Gary Bradshaw

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December 16, 2004

Technology and Magic

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

and ...

When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
---Arthur C. Clarke

Source: The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, December 16, 2004 by Garrison Keillor

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December 14, 2004

Unresolvable Disputes?

It is my belief that there are no such things as unresolvable disputes in the world.
---HH The Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Tuesday, December 14th 2004 (Human Rights Day) entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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December 13, 2004

Humanity's Survival

Humanity's survival depends on the health of the community in the same way that ants and bees coexist. Such small insects create communities without any religion, any constitution, or any law.
People can do the same if they develop compassion so they feel responsible for others.
---HH The Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Friday, December 10th 2004 (Human Rights Day) entry
See Also: The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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December 10, 2004

One Phone Call to Make

If you were going to die soon and had only one phone call you could make, who would you call and what would you say? ....
And why are you waiting?
---Stephen Levine

Source: QuoteWorld.com's Deathbed Search Results
See also Wisdom Channel's Thinking Allowed Interview with Stephen Levine.

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December 9, 2004

The Incredible to Be Known

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.
---Blaise Pascal

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar for Tuesday, December 7, 2004
See also Blaise Pascal on Wikipedia

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December 7, 2004

Pearl Harbor Attacked, Dec. 7, 1941

World War 2 Era Poster (1942) Commemorating the Attack on Pearl Harbor

Source: Eyewitness to History

World War 2 Era Poster (1942) Commemorating the Attack on Pearl Harbor

Yesterday, December 7, 1941 -- a date which will live in infamy -- the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

The United States was at peace with that nation and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with its Government and its Emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific. Indeed, one hour after Japanese air squadrons had commenced bombing in Oahu, the Japanese Ambassador to the United States and his colleague delivered to the Secretary of State a formal reply to a recent American message. While this reply stated that it seemed useless to continue the existing diplomatic negotiations, it contained no threat or hint of war or armed attack.

It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time the Japanese Government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

The attack yesterday on the Hawaiian Islands has caused severe damage to American naval and military forces. Very many American lives have been lost. In addition American ships have been reported torpedoed on the high seas between San Francisco and Honolulu.

Yesterday the Japanese Government also launched an attack against Malaya. Last night Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong. Last night Japanese forces attacked Guam. Last night Japanese forces attacked the Philippine Islands. Last night the Japanese attacked Wake Island. This morning the Japanese attacked Midway Island.

Japan has, therefore, undertaken a surprise offensive extending throughout the Pacific area. The facts of yesterday speak for themselves. The people of the United States have already formed their opinions and well understand the implicationsto the very life and safety of our nation.

As Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy, I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense.

Always will we remember the character of the onslaught against us. No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people in their righteous might will win through to absolute victory.

I believe I interpret the will of the Congress and of the people when I assert that we will not only defend ourselves to the uttermost but will make very certain that this form of treachery shall never endanger us again.

Hostilities exist. There is no blinking at the fact that our people, our territory and our interests are in grave danger. With confidence in our armed forces -- with the unbounded determination of our people -- we will gain the inevitable triumph -- so help us God.

I ask that the Congress declare that since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, December seventh, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese Empire.
----President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, December 8, 1941 Address to Joint Session of the U.S. Congress

Source: Social Justice Speeches Project A Date Which Will Live in Infamy by Franklin Delano Roosevelt

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December 6, 2004

Choices You Get

You don't get to choose how you're going to die, or when.
You can decide how you're going to live now.
-- Joan Baez (b. 1941), American folk singer, political activist

Source: QuoteWorld.com search results for deathbed quotations

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December 5, 2004

Love Looks Not

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
---William Shakespeare

Source: Helena observes in Midsummer's Night Dream (I, i, 234)

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December 4, 2004

An Instrument of Your Peace

Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.

O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love; For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; it is in dying that we are born again to eternal life.
---St Francis of Assisi

Source: CatholicWomen.com's Kitchen Catechism St. Francis' Prayer

Posted by niganit at 8:28 PM | Comments (0)
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December 1, 2004

Enlightened Leader is Heedful

No leader should put troops into the field merely to gratify his own spleen; no leader should fight simply out of pique. But a kingdom that has once been destroyed can never come again into being; nor can the dead ever be brought back to life. Hence the enlightened leader is heedful, and the good leader full of caution.
---Sun Tzu (c. 6th-5th century B.C.)

Source: Military Encounters: Quotations on War & Peace edited by Robert Edwards 2004 Barnes & Noble Books ISBN 0-7607-6324-0

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November 29, 2004

Out of the Ruts of Ordinary Perception

To be shaken out of the ruts of ordinary perception, to be shown for a few timeless hours the outer and inner world, not as they appear to an animal obsessed with survival or to a human being obsessed with words and notions, but as they are apprehended, directly and unconditionally, by Mind at Large -- this is an experience of inestimable value to everyone and especially to the intellectual.
--Aldous Huxley The Doors of Perception

Source: some-guy.com Words of Wisdom

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November 28, 2004

Holy Curiosity

The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality.
It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.
---Albert Einstein (attributed)

Source: Albert Einstein - Wikiquote

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November 27, 2004

Man is a Religious Animal

Man is a Religious Animal. He is the only Religious Animal. He is the only animal that has the True Religion -- several of them. He is the only animal that loves his neighbor as himself and cuts his throat if his theology isn't straight. He has made a graveyard of the globe in trying his honest best to smooth his brother's path to happiness and heaven....The higher animals have no religion. And we are told that they are going to be left out in the Hereafter.
I wonder why? It seems questionable taste.
---Mark Twain in The Lowest Animal essay, 1897

Source: some-guy.com's Mark Twain Quotes

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November 25, 2004

Thankfulness

Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow.
--Melody Beattie

Source: QuoteLady.com's Thankfulness Quotes Page
I dedicate this day, Thanksgiving Day, 2004, to all my family, near and far, and how deeply thankful I am that I am in their lives. I am also very, very grateful for the friends of my life, those now in my life and those who have faded away from closeness. All have been my blessings.

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November 24, 2004

Risks to Take

There is the risk you cannot afford to take,
and there is the risk you cannot afford not to take.
---Peter Drucker

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November 22, 2004

Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You

And so, my fellow americans: ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country.
My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.
---John F. Kennedy, Inaugural address, January 20, 1961

Source: The Quotations Page of President John F. Kennedy Quotes

America's leadership must be guided by the lights of learning and reason or else those who confuse rhetoric with reality and the plausible with the possible will gain the popular ascendancy with their seemingly swift and simple solutions to every world problem.
---President John F. Kennedy,
Remarks Prepared for Delivery at the Trade Mart in Dallas, November 22, 1963
(Never Delivered)

Source: John Fitzgerald Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum Remarks Prepared for Delivery at the Trade Mart in Dallas

This entry is dedicated to the memory of President John F. Kennedy
On Friday, November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was shot as he rode in a motorcade through the streets of Dallas, Texas. At his death, the 35th president was 46 years old and had served less than three years in office. During that short time, Kennedy and his young wife, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, became immensely popular both at home and abroad.
Read more about this Day in History, November 22 on the Library of Congress Web site.

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November 20, 2004

Efficiency ... in Reverse

There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.
---Peter Drucker

Source: Peter Drucker Quotes on CreativeQuotations.com

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November 19, 2004

The Gettysburg Address

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it as a final resting place for those who died here that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead who struggled here have hallowed it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us--that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.
---Abraham Lincoln November 19, 1863

Source: University of Oklahoma Law Center's U.S. Historical Documents Collection

Explanatory notes on the National Archives' ourdocuments.gov

Perhaps the most famous battle of the Civil War took place at Gettysburg, PA, July 1 to July 3, 1863. At the end of the battle, the Union's Army of the Potomac had successfully repelled the second invasion of the North by the Confederacy's Army of Northern Virginia. Several months later, President Lincoln went to Gettysburg to speak at the dedication of the cemetery for the Union war dead. Speaking of a "new birth of freedom," he delivered one of the most memorable speeches in U.S. history.

At the end of the Battle of Gettysburg, more than 51,000 Confederate and Union soldiers were wounded, missing, or dead. Many of those who died were laid in makeshift graves along the battlefield. Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin commissioned David Wills, an attorney, to purchase land for a proper burial site for the deceased Union soldiers. Wills acquired 17 acres for the cemetery, which was planned and designed by landscape architect William Saunders.

The cemetery was dedicated on November 19, 1863. The main speaker for the event was Edward Everett, one of the nations foremost orators. President Lincoln was also invited to speak as Chief Executive of the nation, formally [to] set apart these grounds to their sacred use by a few appropriate remarks. At the ceremony, Everett spoke for more than 2 hours; Lincoln spoke for 2 minutes.

President Lincoln had given his brief speech a lot of thought. He saw meaning in the fact that the Union victory at Gettysburg coincided with the nations birthday; but rather than focus on the specific battle in his remarks, he wanted to present a broad statement about the larger significance of the war. He invoked the Declaration of Independence, and its principles of liberty and equality, and he spoke of a new birth of freedom for the nation. In his brief address, he continued to reshape the aims of the war for the American peopletransforming it from a war for Union to a war for Union and freedom. Although Lincoln expressed disappointment in the speech initially, it has come to be regarded as one of the most elegant and eloquent speeches in U.S. history.

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November 18, 2004

To Help Others

We are all here on earth to help others. What on earth the others are here for I don't know.
---W. H. Auden

Source: Practice Kindnes series window card by Compendium, Inc., Lynnwood, WA
See also: PoetryConnection.net's W. H. Auden biography and Selcted Poems

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November 16, 2004

War's Shocking Fact

The most shocking fact about war is that its victims and its instruments are individual human beings, and that these human beings are condemned by the monstrous conventions of politics to murder and be murdered in quarrels not their own.
---Alduos Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Military Encounters: Quotations on War & Peace edited by Robert Edwards, Barnes & Noble Books 2004 ISBN 0-7607-6324-0

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November 15, 2004

To Be Criticized

Long experience has shown me that to be criticized is not always to be wrong.
---Anthony Eden

Source: The Little Book of Humorous Quotations, Chapter 4, Social Comment edited by Alison Bullivant 2004 Barnes & Noble Books ISBN 0-7607-3776-2
See also BRITANNIA.COM's page about Prime Minister Anthony Eden

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November 14, 2004

Your Reputation

Until you've lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was or what freedom really is.
---Margaret Mitchell

Source: CreativeQuotations for November 8 for Margaret Mitchell

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November 13, 2004

I Hate War

I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as one who has seen its brutality, its futility, its studpidity
---Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890 - 1969)

Source: Military Encounters: Quotations on War & Peace edited by Robert Edwards, Barnes & Noble Books 2004 ISBN 0-7607-6324-0

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November 11, 2004

In Flanders Fields

DDG83 in heavy sea way 29 Aug 04
USS HOWARD (DDG-83) in heavy sea way
29 Aug 04, South China Sea, RAS approach
US Navy photo

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields
---by LTC John McCrae, M.D. May 1915

Source: Sheryl's Holiday Site: Veterans Day
For an explanation of the poem and the significance of the poppies

This entry, made on November 11th, 2004 is to honor of all my brothers and sisters who are serving and have served honorably in defense of these United States.
In particular, I honor:
My Dad, Richard C., who served in the US Army in the Pacific Campaigns of World War 2;
My Father-in-Law, Earl, who served with the US Air Force's Eighth Air Force in the European Theater of World War 2;
My Brother-in-Law, Bill, who served in the US Navy aboard aircraft carriers during the Viet Nam era;
All my Brothers of our Men's movement and Buffalo Gap;
My late Father-in-Law, Thomas (Doc), who served in the US Navy in Alaskan waters during World War 2;
My late Mother-in-Law, Doris, who served in the US Navy Nurse Corps during World War 2. Her specialty included caring for Navy and Marine Corps amputees in the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia.
All my former shipmates with whom I served through my service in the US Navy from 1970 through 1994
And I honor my own service in the US Navy and the Naval Reserve

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November 9, 2004

If I Knew That Today ...

If I knew that today would be the last time Id see you,
I would hug you tight and pray the Lord be the keeper of your soul.
If I knew that this would be the last time you pass through this door,
Id embrace you, kiss you, and call you back for one more.
If I knew that this would be the last time I would hear your voice,
Id take hold of each word to be able to hear it over and over again.
If I knew this is the last time I see you,
Id tell you I love you, and would not just assume foolishly you know it already.
---Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Source: Elise's Quotes: Gabriel Garcia Marquez
See also Gabriel Garcia Marquez: Macondo - This Modern World Gabo Author Page

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November 3, 2004

Future by Yogi

The future ain't what it used to be
---Yogi Berra

Source: I found this somewhere and seems to be attributed to famous baseball player and manager Yogi Berra
My thoughts the day after Democratic Presidential candidate, Senator John F. Kerry, conceded the 2004 race to the incumbent President George W. Bush

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October 30, 2004

Change the World with Love

The quickest way to change the world is to be of service to others.
Show that your love can make a difference in the lives of people and thereby someone else's love can make a difference in your life. By each of us doing that and working together we change the world one inner person at a time.
---Dannion Brinkley

Source: Dannion Brinkley's Web site about Compassion in Action

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October 29, 2004

Aim of Education

To save man from the morass of propaganda, in my opinion, is one of the chief aims of education.
Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern true from false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction.
----Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, entry for Sat/Sun February 7/8 2004

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October 26, 2004

Living Your Life

There are only two ways to live your life.
One is as though nothing is a miracle.
The other is as though everything is a miracle.
---Albert Einstein

Source: Expect a Miracle Window Card series by Compendium, Inc., Lynnwood, WA

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October 25, 2004

Unheralded Lives, But...

The majority of us lead quiet, unheralded lives as we pass through this world. There will most likely be no ticker-tape parades for us, no monuments created in our honor.
    But that does not lessen our possible impact, for there are scores of people waiting for someone just like us to come along; people who will appreciate our compassion, our unique talents. Someone who will live a happier life merely because we took the time to share what we had to give.
     Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have a potential to turn a life around. It's overwhelming to consider the continuous opportunities there are to make our love felt.
---Leo Buscaglia

Source: The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation
See also the World of Leo Buscaglia

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October 21, 2004

Sea Fever

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking,
And a grey mist on the sea's face and a grey dawn breaking.

I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,
To the gull's way and the whale's way, where the wind's like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,
And quite sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over.
----John Masefield (1878-1967) (English Poet Laureate, 1930-1967)

Source: Elise's Wonderful, Inspirational Collection of Quotes, and Poetry, and Sayings

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October 17, 2004

The Journey; Not the Destination

Accomplishments will prove to be a journey, not a destination.
---Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969)

Source: Creative Quotations for Dwight D. Eiesenhower, born October 16

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October 15, 2004

Contact with Life

Making Contact
I believe
The greatest gift
I can conceive of having
from anyone
is to be seen by them,
heard by them,
to be understood
and
touched by them.
The greatest gift
I can give
is
to see, hear, understand
and to touch
another person.
When this is done
I feel
contact has been made.
---Virginia Satir

Source: Teaching With Fire: Poetry That Sustains the Courage to Teach Sam M. Intrator & Megan Scribner, editors
ISBN: 0-7879-6970-2
David Gurteen's Knowledge Web Site Virginia Satir Page

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October 13, 2004

Navy Birthday

Happy 229nd Birthday, US Navy

When asked what I am most proud of, I stick out my chest, hold my head high and state proudly, 'I served in the United States Navy!'
---President John F. Kennedy, 35th President (1917--1963)

Source: thinkExist.com's Quotations with Navy

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October 12, 2004

Human Hand

I think the human hand is meant for embracing and not for hitting.
---HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar: Tuesday, October 12, 2004

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October 10, 2004

Why We Call It the Present

many people will walk in and out of your life, but only true friends will leave footprints in your heart. to handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart. anger is only one letter short of danger. if someone betrays you once, it is his fault; if he betrays you twice, it is your fault. great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people. he who loses a friend, lose much more; he who loses faith, loses all. beautiful young people are accidents of nature, but beautiful old people are works of art. learn from the mistakes of others. you can't live long enough tp make them all yourself. friends you and me....you brought another friend....and then there were three...we started our group....our circle of friends....and like that circle....there is no beginnning or end....yesterday is history. tomorrow is mystery. today is a gift, that's why they call it the present.
----Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962)

Source: quotablecards #115 at quotablecards.com

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October 5, 2004

Our Own Wisdom

It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err.
---Mahatma Gandhi

Source: Creative Quotations from Mahatma Gandhi

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October 2, 2004

No Man Is An Island

No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friends or thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
---John Donne (1572-1631)
from Devotions upon Emergent Occasions
MEDITATION XVII

Source: Wisdom of the Ages: A Modern Master Brings Eternal Truths into Everyday Life by Wayne W. Dyer
ISBN = 0-06-019231-3

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September 30, 2004

Soft and Rigid

Water is fluid, soft, and yielding. But water will wear away rock, which is rigid and cannot yield. As a rule, whatever is fluid, soft, and yielding will overcome whatever is rigid and hard. this is another paradox: what is soft is strong.
---Lao-tzu

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar: for Sat/Sun July/Aug 31/1

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September 29, 2004

The Source of the Problem

This is the same planet, same human beings, same potential, same rights, but some are dying, some have surpluses. This is unequal, and not only morally wrong, but practically also the source of the problem.
---HH the Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar: Wednesday, April 7, 2004

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September 25, 2004

In Autumn, One Leaf Falls

In Autumn, one leaf falls, then another, then all the beautiful flowers die until we are surrounded by bare naked plants. We do not feel so joyful. Why is this?
Because deep down, we desire constructive, fruitful growth and dislike things collapsing, dying, or beingdestroyed.
---Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Friday, September 24th entry
The Tibetan Government in Exile: About His Holiness The Dalai Lama

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September 21, 2004

Happiness For All

Everybody wants a happy life.
Me too.
---Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Monday, September 20th entry

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September 11, 2004

Happy Birthday, Mom

Clancy of the Overflow

I had written him a letter which I had, for want of better
Knowledge, sent to where I met him down the Lachlan, years ago,
He was shearing when I knew him, so I sent the letter to him,
Just on spec, addressed as follows, "Clancy, of The Overflow"

And an answer came directed in a writing unexpected,
(And I think the same was written with a thumb-nail dipped in tar)
Twas his shearing mate who wrote it, and verbatim I will quote it:
"Clancy's gone to Queensland droving, and we don't know where he are."

* * * * * * * * *

In my wild erratic fancy visions come to me of Clancy
Gone a-droving "down the Cooper" where the Western drovers go;
As the stock are slowly stringing, Clancy rides behind them singing,
For the drover's life has pleasures that the townsfolk never know.

And the bush hath friends to meet him, and their kindly voices greet him
In the murmur of the breezes and the river on its bars,
And he sees the vision splendid of the sunlit plains extended,
And at night the wond'rous glory of the everlasting stars.

* * * * * * * * *

I am sitting in my dingy little office, where a stingy
Ray of sunlight struggles feebly down between the houses tall,
And the foetid air and gritty of the dusty, dirty city
Through the open window floating, spreads its foulness over all

And in place of lowing cattle, I can hear the fiendish rattle
Of the tramways and the buses making hurry down the street,
And the language uninviting of the gutter children fighting,
Comes fitfully and faintly through the ceaseless tramp of feet.

And the hurrying people daunt me, and their pallid faces haunt me
As they shoulder one another in their rush and nervous haste,
With their eager eyes and greedy, and their stunted forms and weedy,
For townsfolk have no time to grow, they have no time to waste.

And I somehow rather fancy that I'd like to change with Clancy,
Like to take a turn at droving where the seasons come and go,
While he faced the round eternal of the cash-book and the journal
--But I doubt he'd suit the office, Clancy, of The Overflow.
---A. B. (Andrew Barton) "Banjo" Paterson

Source: University of Queensland, Australia "Banjo" Paterson's Cancy of the Overflow First published in the The Bulletin in 1889.

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Courage: What is It?

Love makes courage necessary. And it's love that makes courage possible for all of us to possess. You get courage by loving something more than your own well-being. When you love virtue, when you love freedom, when you love other people, you find the strength to demand courage of yourself and of those who aspire to lead you. Only then will you find the courage, as Eleanor Roosevelt put it, "to do the thing you think you cannot do."
--Sen. John McCain

Source: FastCompany magazine article In Search of Courage by Senator John McCain, FastCompany Issue 86 September 2004

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September 10, 2004

How Many Deaths?

Yes'n how many deaths will it take till he knows
That too many people have died?
The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind...
---Bob Dylan

Source: An email signature that I received today, September 10, 2004
See also: Blowin' in the Wind, Lyrics

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September 1, 2004

We Can Be Undefeatable

Life is either a daring adventure or nothing. To keep our faces toward change and behave like free spirits in the presence of fate is strength undefeatable.
---Helen Keller:
Graduated from Radcliffe College in 1904. She was the first blind-and-deaf student ever to graduate from any college anywhere.

Source: The Writer's Alamanac: Garrison Keillor, For Wednesday, September 1st, 2004

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August 30, 2004

Man, You Are in Error

It is one thing to show a man that he is in an error, and another to put him in possession of truth.
---John Locke (1732-1704)

Source: John Locke's CreativeQuotations page. He was born August 29, 1632.

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August 23, 2004

Imagination is Boundless

The world of reality has its limits;
the world of imagination is boundless.
---Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Source: Teachers daily calendar entry for Sat/Sun, August 21/22, 2004

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August 11, 2004

Universal Human Rights

I write this on the 86th birthday [July 19, 2004] of Nelson Mandela, who is also a chair-man. He is the chairman of the social conscience of the human race. He never gave up he never gave in. He is the living proof that the long goal, the great dream, is paid for by those who do what they can with what they have where they are, day by day by day by day. Until someday, when humankind realizes how far we have come by virtue of the steadfastness of those who have clear maps in their minds for the invisible road that leads to universal human rights. Every day he persevered moved us all further down the road.
---Robert Fulghum

Source: Robert Fulghum's Current Stories, July 19, 2004 entry.

On this day, we celebrate the ninety-second birthday of my dear Father-in-Law, Earl. He is truly an inspiration and a friend. I cherish his brotherhood, and his faith and love in me and my sweet bride and wife, his daughter. I can only hope to be half as vibrant and full of life when I am 92 as he is today. Bless you, Dad.

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August 6, 2004

Hiroshima Atomic Bombing + 59 years

Fifty-Nine years ago on August 6, 1945, the United States of America opened up the Atomic Age by dropping an Atomic Bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower said
"...in [July] 1945... Secretary of War Stimson, visiting my headquarters in Germany, informed me that our government was preparing to drop an atomic bomb on Japan. I was one of those who felt that there were a number of cogent reasons to question the wisdom of such an act. ...the Secretary, upon giving me the news of the successful bomb test in New Mexico, and of the plan for using it, asked for my reaction, apparently expecting a vigorous assent.

"During his recitation of the relevant facts, I had been conscious of a feeling of depression and so I voiced to him my grave misgivings, first on the basis of my belief that Japan was already defeated and that dropping the bomb was completely unnecessary, and secondly because I thought that our country should avoid shocking world opinion by the use of a weapon whose employment was, I thought, no longer mandatory as a measure to save American lives. It was my belief that Japan was, at that very moment, seeking some way to surrender with a minimum loss of 'face'. The Secretary was deeply perturbed by my attitude..."
---Dwight Eisenhower, Mandate For Change, pg. 380

Source: Doug Long's Hiroshima Web Site, quotes

Source: Mandate for Change, 1953-1956: The White House Years. by Dwight D. Eisenhower, Doubleday, Garden City, NY., 1963

Sixteen hours ago an American airplane dropped one bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, and destroyed its usefulness to the enemy. That bomb had more power than 20,000 tons of T.N.T. It had more than two thousand times the blast power of the British Grand Slam, which is the largest bomb ever yet used in the history of warfare.
---Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, August 6, 1945, first public announcement of the event

Source: Yale Law School's Avalon Project on the Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Introduction

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August 4, 2004

War = Murder?

War is no different than a murder in the street.
---Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Wednesday, August 4th entry

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August 3, 2004

Not the Critic (or, Man in the Arena)

It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly,
so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.
---Theodore Roosevelt in his "Citizenship in a Republic," Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, April 23, 1910

Source: Theodore Roosevelt Association's Theodore Roosevelt Quotes

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July 29, 2004

Passion and Action of Our Time

As life is action and passion, it is required of a man that he should share the passion and action of his time,
at the peril of being judged not to have lived.
---Oliver Wendell Holmes

Source: Brainyquote.com

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July 20, 2004

Apollo 11 35th Anniversary

Buzz Aldrin on ladder to lunar surface

Source: NASA

July 20, 1969, U.S Astronaut Buzz Aldrin steps off the Lunar Module onto Earth's moon to be the second man on the moon.

Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.
---U.S. Astronaut Neil Armstong, July 20, 1969 as the Lunar Module lands on Earth's moon.

That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.
---U.S. Astronaut Neil Armstong, July 20, 1969 as he steps off the Lunar Module to be the first man to step foot upon Earth's moon.

It's the summer of 2004 and NASA is plotting a new course into the cosmos. The Vision for Space Exploration calls for a return to the moon, followed by journeys of discovery to Mars and beyond. There are many uncertainties on the road ahead, but there should be no doubt that NASA can set lofty goals and meet them.
---NASA's Web site July 20, 2004

Source: NASA - Apollo 11 at 35

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July 13, 2004

I Forgive You

And throughout all Eternity
I forgive you, you forgive me.
---William Blake from his poem Broken Love

Source: poemhunter.com's Broken Love by William Blake

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July 12, 2004

Lincoln on Slavery

It is the eternal struggle between these two principles---right and wrong---throughout the world.
They are the two principles that have stood face to face from the beginning of time; and will ever continue to struggle. The one is the common right of humanity and the other the divine right of kings.
It is the same principle in whatever shape it develops itself. It is the same spirit that says. "You toil and work and earn bread, and I'll eat it."
No matter in what shape it comes, whether from the mouth of a king who seeks to bestride the people of his own nation and live by the fruit of their labor, or from one race of men as an apology for enslaving another race, it is the same tyrannical principle.
---Abraham Lincoln

Source: The Wit & Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln: A Treasury of Quotations, Anecdotes, and Observations by James C. Humes 1999 ISBN 0-517-20719-2

Posted by niganit at 8:06 PM
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July 11, 2004

Jefferson on Burr

A great man in little things, he is really small in great ones.
---Thomas Jefferson speaking about Aaron Burr after Burr killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel, July 11, 1804

Source: National Park Service's Lewis & Clark 1804 Headlines

Posted by niganit at 8:25 PM | Comments (0)
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July 10, 2004

Benefits of Travel

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness.
---Mark Twain

Source: The Ultimate Pocket Positives: a Second Antholgy of Inspirational Thoughts Editor: Maggie Pinkney 2002 ISBN 1-86503-579-3

Posted by niganit at 8:33 PM | Comments (0)
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July 7, 2004

Our Job in Life

As human beings, our job in life is to help people realize how rare and valuable each one of us really is,
that each of us has something that no one else has--
or ever will have--something inside that is unique to all time.
It's our job to encourage each other to discover that uniqueness and to provide ways of developing its expression.
---Fred Rogers (Mister Rogers)

Source: The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember by Fred Rogers 2003 ISBN 1-4013-0106-1
See also: Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Posted by niganit at 7:37 PM | Comments (0)
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June 25, 2004

Approach Immortality

If something comes to life in others because of you, then you have made an approach to immortality.
---Norman Cousins

Source: Teachers Calendar Thursday, June 24, 2004 entry

Posted by niganit at 12:00 PM | Comments (0)
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June 17, 2004

Love What You Do

To love what you do and feel that it matters -- how could anything be more fun?
---Katharine Graham (1917-2001)

Source: Creative Quotations from Katharine Graham by the Creative Quotations Web Site

Posted by niganit at 8:49 AM | Comments (0)
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June 13, 2004

Six Mistakes of Man

1.  The illusion that personal gain is made up of crushing others

2.  The tendency to worry about things that cannot be changed or corrected.

3.  Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it.

4.  Refusing to set aside trivial preferences.

5.  Neglecting development and refinement of the mind, and not acquiring the habit of reading and study.

6.  Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.
---Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 B.C. - 43 B.C.

Source: Wisdom of the Ages: A Modern Master Brings Eternal Truths into Everyday Life by Wayne W. Dyer ISBN 0-06-019231-3

Posted by niganit at 7:30 PM | Comments (0)
More like this: Ancient Thoughts | Famous People | Profound

June 11, 2004

Your Fears

Never let your fears hold you back from pursuing your hopes.
---John F. Kennedy

Source: Expect a Miracle series window card, Compendium, Inc., Lynnwood, WA

Posted by niganit at 12:28 PM | Comments (0)
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June 10, 2004

Chance for Peace

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.

This world in arms is not spending money alone.

It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.
---President Dwight D. Esienhower

Source: Dwight D. Eisenmhower, The Chance for Peace speech, April 16, 1953 Washington, D.C. Social Justice Speeches Project of the Edchange.com Multicultural Education Pavilion

Posted by niganit at 8:03 PM | Comments (0)
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June 4, 2004

D-Day :: Gen Eisenhower to the Allied Expeditionary Force

Gen'l Eisenhower with paratroopers from the 502nd Parachute Infantry of the 101st Airborne Division June 5, 1944, at Greenham Common Airfield in Newbury, England

Eisenhower Library

Ike meets with paratroopers from the 502nd Parachute Infantry of the 101st Airborne Division June 5, 1944, at Greenham Common Airfield in Newbury, England.

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for overselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle-hardened. He will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory!

I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory! Good luck! And let us all beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.
General Eisenhower's order of the day, 5 June 1944

Source: D-Day Quotations on wacotrib.com a product of the Waco (Texas) Tribune-Herald

Posted by niganit at 8:13 PM | Comments (0)
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May 30, 2004

Two Ways to Live

There are only two ways to live your life.
One is as though nothing is a miracle.
The other is as though everything is a miracle.
---Albert Einstein

Source: Quote Card received by Mr. W. on Saturday, May 29, 2004. Scribe: mary anne m.b.l. radmacher

Posted by niganit at 8:41 AM | Comments (0)
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May 17, 2004

Kind Words

Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.
---Mother Teresa

Source: Practice Kindness window card series, Compendium, Inc., Lynnwood, WA

Posted by niganit at 10:20 PM | Comments (0)
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May 4, 2004

Life for Our Children

Let us put our minds together and see what kind of life we can make for our children.
---Sitting Bull

Source: Teachers daily calendar, Thursday April 29th, 2004 entry

Posted by niganit at 9:38 AM
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May 3, 2004

The Human Condition

Each human has to take responsibility for the human condition or else who will do it?
---Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Saturday, May 1st entry

Happy Birthday to my sister Sue on this beautiful May day!

Posted by niganit at 8:30 AM
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April 28, 2004

Do A Thing Right

It takes less time to do a thing right than to explain why you did it wrong.
---Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Source: Public Speaking: Quotations article by Advanced Public Speaking Institute.

Posted by niganit at 9:01 AM | Comments (0)
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April 26, 2004

Doing Our Best

Nobody knows what is the best he can do.
---Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957)

Source: Whatever It Takes Window Card Series, Compendium Inc., Edmonds, WA

Posted by niganit at 9:22 AM | Comments (0)
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April 23, 2004

Problems Solved

Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them.
--Albert Einstein

Source: Mr. Wersinger's Palm m515

Posted by niganit at 11:05 AM
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April 19, 2004

Violent Clashes

Once the causes and conditions that lead to violent clashes have fully ripened and erupted, it is very difficult to control them and restore peace.
---Dalai Lama

Source: Words of Wisdom Daily Calendar, Sunday, April 18th, 2004

Posted by niganit at 12:09 PM
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March 30, 2004

Deja Vu

This is like deja vu all over again.
---Yogi Berra

Source: Yogi Berra Quotes - The Quotation Page

Posted by niganit at 9:30 PM | Comments (0)
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March 25, 2004

Given to Me

"So much has been given to me I have no time to ponder over that which has been denied."
---Helen Keller

Source: Little Miracles series; Compendium, Inc. Edmonds, WA

Posted by niganit at 7:43 AM | Comments (0)
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March 24, 2004

What Can Be

"Most people see what is, and never see what can be."
---Albert Einstein

Source: Expect a Miracle series; Compendium, Inc. Edmonds, WA

Posted by niganit at 7:44 AM | Comments (0)
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March 23, 2004

Think You Cannot

"You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, 'I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.' You must do the thing you think you cannot do."
---Eleanor Roosevelt

The Quotations Page on Eleanor Roosevelt

Andrew's quote struck me as so similar to Eleanor Roosevelt's they had to be included on the same day!

Posted by niganit at 10:22 AM | Comments (0)
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March 17, 2004

Are You a Dreamer?

We need men who can dream of things that never were."
---John F. Kennedy

Source: From his speech in Dublin, Ireland, June 28, 1963 found on QuotationsPage.com

Posted by niganit at 8:45 AM | Comments (0)
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March 11, 2004

Make a Life

from what we get, we can make a living:
what we give, however, makes a life.
---Arthur Ashe

scribe: mary anne m.b.l. radmacher online at word garden

Posted by niganit at 8:25 AM | Comments (0)
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March 10, 2004

Lives Sublime

Lives of Great men all remind us
We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time.

Footprints, that perhaps another,
Sailing o'er life's solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,
Seeing, shall take heart again.
----Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Posted on MrWteaches.net on Sept. 12, 2001 in honor of the heroes of that horrific day


Posted by niganit at 10:00 AM | Comments (0)
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March 9, 2004

Fear to Attempt

Our doubts are traitors, and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt.
--from "Measure for Measure" by William Shakespeare

Source: Teachers Daily Calendar, Thursday, Mar 6/7.

Posted by niganit at 10:20 AM | Comments (0)
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March 4, 2004

Too Late?

It is never too late to be what you might have been.
--George Eliot (Marian Evans)

Source: Brilliance series, Compendium, Inc.

Posted by niganit at 8:27 PM | Comments (0)
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Prejudices

Most men, when they are thinking, are merely rearranging their prejudices.
--Knute Rockne

Source: creativequotations.com

Posted by niganit at 1:03 PM | Comments (0)
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February 26, 2004

The Future ...

Eleanor Roosevelt said:

The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.

Source: May Your Dreams Come True series, Compendium, Inc, Lynwood, WA

Posted by niganit at 5:21 PM
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